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Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman is possibly one of the best examples of an artist who drew no distinctions between art and culture. To Whitman art is culture, and culture is history. His role as an artist must then be intrinsically manifesting himself as a representative of the America masses, or express himself as America personified. He saw democracy as an inseparable attribute of Americaness. However, the America he lived in was desperately fractured amongst differing factions with different opinions on the definition of “democracy”....   [tags: Walt Whitman on Democracy ]

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Walt Whitman And His Work

- Walt Whitman, born in May of 1819, grew up with an affinity for America. Originally from Long Island, New York, Whitman moved to Brooklyn as a child in hopes that his father would find work in the city. However, when that did not happen, his father took Walt out of school in order for him to work and bring in an extra income. Whitman began his working career at age eleven by working in one of Brooklyn’s attorney offices. Shortly afterwards, he began getting involved in the printing business and fell in love with it....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Ralph Emerson And Walt Whitman

- Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman are two of the most iconic American poets of the 19th century. Emerson and Whitman were both revolutionaries in American poetry, in their own time and their own right. When Emerson released his piece “The Poet,” a writing that challenged all of the American poets to become, as he put it, the next “Great American Poet,” which would address all of “the facts of the animal economy, sex, nutriment, gestation, birth.” Of all the poets that read Emerson’s piece, Whitman was the one who decided to “put the living, breathing, sexual body at the center of much of his poetry, challenging conventions of the day” (“Walt Whitman”, The Norton Anthology of American Lit...   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Walt Whitman And The New York

- May 31, 1819, Walt Whitman was born to Walter Whitman and Louisa Van Velsor. Walt was the second son of nine children who lived in New York in the 1820’s and 1830’s. Between 1825 and 1830 Walt attended public school in Brooklyn while his family moved often within the city. At twelve Walt began to learn the trade of printing to then begin loving the written word. Whitman worked as a printer until the age of seventeen when a fire destroyed where he worked. In 1836 he began working as a school teacher in Long Island until 1841 when he became a full-time journalist....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, United States]

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Song Of Myself By Walt Whitman

- “Song of Myself” by Walt Whitman is a great American poem that reflects the nation’s ideals such as freedom, equality, and unity. These ideas were much needed at the time of its first publication in 1855, ten years before the American Civil War. The poem was published again 1n 1891 just before the poet’s death. “Song of Myself” should serve as an American epic because of its representation of American tradition, culture, and ideals. It also strives to include all of the country’s extremely diverse population, which is a difficult task....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, American Civil War]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman And Emily Dickinson

- The poems by Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson are known to be the cornerstones of American poetry in the way that they view the aspect of life and death. The writers themselves could not have been more different in their poems about these subjects. Walt Whitman has been called by several to be the grandfather of modern day poetry. In his poems he expresses the journey that is to live and to die. Whitman also shows through his work the importance of staying outside of social norms while also expressing yourself in any way that one might see fit....   [tags: Death, Poetry, Walt Whitman, Life]

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Summary Of ' Leaves Of Grass ' By Walt Whitman

- America during the late 1700’s and early 1800’s appeared to seemingly be a very controversial time. The experiences that American’s went through during this era heavily impacted the way they thought, wrote, and handled day-to-day life. For the poet, Walt Whitman, he was influenced to publish, “a volume containing twelve untitled poems along with an exuberant preface declaring his ambition to be the American bard” (Levine 1312). In his book, “Leaves of Grass,” Whitman’s preface gives truthful insight into the American life and culture, and recognizes that America symbolizes freedom for all and that we are equal....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States, Ralph Waldo Emerson]

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Analysis Of ' Leaves Of Grass ' By Walt Whitman

- American poet, Walt Whitman explores the connection between the concept of the nation and the poet as a means of further establishing the national identity of the United States of America. The preface to his collection of poetry, entitled Leaves of Grass, first published in 1855 merely 79 years after the United States was founded acts as a reinforcement of nationalist sensibilities that work to define what the American is on a internal and international scale. Within this text Whitman creates an inventory of the attributes that are defining of the poet as an individual, emphasizing the positive qualities as being linked to their vocation....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Song Of Myself '

- “Song of Myself” Analysis Contrary to most poets during the nineteenth century, Whitman’s writings do not conform to the conventions of society. His works are written for all walks of life to read in a very accessible manner. In the excerpts from “Song of Myself”, Walt Whitman suggests that he is equivalent in magnitude to the entire American population through shifting points of view to empathize with others and universalizing the grass through an extended metaphor. Whitman creates a sense of democracy where everyone is equal to each other by relating to diverse perspectives and demographics....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States, Poetry]

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Walt Whitman 's I Hear America Singing

- In "I, Too," Langston Hughes is obviously in conversation with the earlier poem, Walt Whitman 's "I Hear America Singing." Both poems explore the idea of American identity -- who and what is an American. What characterizes the people of this nation. The two poets, however, reach somewhat different conclusions in response to these questions. In "I Hear America Singing," Whitman refers to "the varied carols" of different workers "mechanics", "the carpenter", " the mason", "the boatman" and "the deck man", "the shoemaker" and "the hatter”....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States, Poetry]

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Crossing Brooklyn Ferry by Walt Whitman

- Through the use of simple diction, Whitman is able to traverse both time and distance and connect with his readers as so few other poets can. His mastery of verbiage draws readers into the poem, as few other poets can. In “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry,” Whitman creates a vignette into the Brooklyn of the past, and he connects it to the present, though in surprising ways. The omnipresence of Whitman allows the reader to envision themselves into the settings he created- and to interpret them into modern language....   [tags: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, Walt Whitman ]

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Walt Whitman as a Voice for the People

- Walt Whitman as a Voice for the People "The proof of a poet is that his country absorbs him as much as he absorbs his country." This brilliant quote from Walt Whitman thus ends his preface to Leaves of Grass, and thereafter begins the poem "Song of Myself." To many, upon their first reading, this was a crude, shocking and distasteful piece of work. but to me...this was a celebration of life. And not just a celebration of his own life, but of every life, of the American life. Walt Whitman is the "voice of the people" and this I believe because, while he did write of things that were not seen as aesthetically beautiful by many...including homosexuality, loneliness, and death....   [tags: Walt Whitman Essays]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Poem ' Song Of Myself

- Walt Whitman’s Religious Vision Embedded at the Heart of Leaves of Grass as seen through the poem, Song of Myself The poetry in Whitman’s Leaves of Grass is specifically forceful. It was written at a time when Walt Whitman’s personal religious perspective was that he himself was a prophet as stated in his first poem “Song of Myself.” This poem appears in Whitman’s first book Leaves of Grass. Whitman says: “Divine am I and out, and I make holy water whatever I touch or am touched from; / The scent of these armpits is aroma finer than prayer; /This head is more than churches or bibles or creeds” (39).The poet’s deistic belief taught him with an appreciation and affection for this perspective...   [tags: Religion, Faith, Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Movement Of Poetry

- In the mid to late eighteenth century, poetry started to change. Everything about it was beginning to change. At this time, poetry was not focused on the as many of the things that it is today. The ideas of sex and more risque feelings were not described or even mention in these poems. At this time poetry was still traditional, but there was one man who set out to chance that. Walt Whitman spearheaded the movement of poetry from a traditional viewpoint to a viewpoint where the reader would be able to get a deeper personal connection with the author, rather than just reading about love....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, Free verse, Abolitionism]

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Walt Whitman 's Views On Women And Industry

- Walt Whitman had many ideas of how America was not living up to what the founding fathers had hoped to have achieved in their democracy a century before in succeeding from England.  Whitman thought that the government was beginning to resemble what the founding fathers had fought and multitudes of soldiers died to escape from. In contrast to what the government had been returning to, Americans as a whole were finding their identity as a very young nation and were proud to call themselves Americans....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, 19th century]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Song Of Myself

- One of the most popular American poets is Walt Whitman. Whitman’s poetry has become a rallying cry for Americans, asking for individuality, self-approval, and even equality. While this poetry seems to be truly groundbreaking, which it objectively was, Whitman was influenced by the writings of others. While Whitman may not have believed in this connection to previous authors, critics have linked him to Emerson, Poe, and even Carlyle. However, many critics have ignored the connection between Walt Whitman and the English writer William Wordsworth....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, Romanticism, Romantic poetry]

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Analysis Of Poem Drum Taps By Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman was an unconventional poet. He developed free-verse poetry and wrote about sex and other ‘obscene’ topics. Perhaps his most interesting poems are those he wrote about war. During the Civil War Whitman was a nurse. One would expect war to be an important theme in Whitman’s poetry and indeed it is. He wrote a series of poems titled Drum Taps. Through these poems we can see Whitman’s progression as an enthusiastic citizen, an enlightened observer, and an anguished war nurse. In the beginning, at least, Whitman believed in the good that this war would bring....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, New Universe, New Jersey]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Song Of Myself

- Walt Whitman is considered the foremost poet of American democracy of his time. Not only did he fully embrace it, but he believed that American democracy was more than a political system, but a way of life (Casale 48). Many of his personal experiences influenced his deep democratic point of view (48). As a volunteer at an army hospital during the American Civil War, he saw many die and became increasingly grateful for the opportunities provided by the American government (Mirsky). Later, as he was residing in New York City, Whitman witnessed America face urbanization....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass, Song of Myself]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Song Of Myself

- Darian Williams American Literature II Ms. Dalton July 3, 2016 Analysis Walt Whitman was a very influential poet in his time era. He was very in tune with the world, his surroundings and people which makes him a humanist of his time. The poem Song of Myself has very mystical and profound ideas in this poem in my opinion. It is the type of poem when you read once and read over and over again you will always find something new about it for years to come because it 's so intriguing. Whitman was somebody who was very struck by his experience in the civil war and his thoughts about the world which transferred into his writing....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Leaves Of Grass And Song Of Myself

- Before Walt Whitman was ever a writer, he was a teacher. He was a teacher who was highly admired by his students. He tended to use methods that were nontraditional, and therefore were typically frowned upon by parents and other adults. However, this did not stop Whitman from expressing himself, and allowing Others to do the same, through his teaching. Whitman’s pedagogy as demonstrated in Leaves of Grass and Song of Myself, though seen as radical in his own time, is one that can be learned from and admired in today 's society....   [tags: Education, Teacher, Teaching, Walt Whitman]

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Walt Whitman's Relation to the Romantic Period

- The time of Romanticism brought upon many trends extending from the idea of individualism as a rebellious separation from the classics, an idealistic outlook and finally to a strong religious base. Most of the writers of the Romantic period followed Pantheism "God is everything and everything is God ... the world is either identical with God or in some way a self-expression of his nature" (Owen 1971: 74). The idea of Pantheism was that everything in the world worked in unity. In some of the works of the Romantic period the expression of nature and humans are not separate entities, but one in the same....   [tags: Romanticism and Walt Whitman]

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Walt Whitman's Influence on Germany

- Walt Whitman's Influence on Germany Walt Whitman (1819-1892) is considered to be one of the greatest American poets of the nineteenth century. While Edgar Allan Poe may have been more widely read, Whitman had more international writers actively respond to him and his poetry than any other American poet. A century after his death, writers around the world are still in dialogue with him, pondering the questions he posed, arguing with him and elaborating on his insights. People have been attracted to Whitman for numerous reasons....   [tags: Walt Whitman Germany Poetry Poets Essays]

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American Influences of Walt Whitman

- American Influences of Walt Whitman In his poems and life, Walt Whitman celebrated the human spirit and the human body. He sang the praises of democracy and marveled at the technological advances of his era. His direct poetic style shocked many of his contemporaries. This style, for which Whitman is famous, is in direct relation to several major American cultural developments. The development of American dictionaries, the growth of baseball, the evolution of Native American policy, and the development of photography all played a part and became essential components of Whitman’s poetry....   [tags: Walt Whitman Writers Poems Poetry Essays]

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Analysis Of The Article ' Walt Whitman 's Different Lights `` By Robert Martin

- “Song of Myself,” Whitman’s great lyric poem, exemplifies his democratic ideals without diminishing the intense feeling of a real world. Walt Whitman had some radical ideas about America, democracy, spirituality, sexuality, nature and identity. He used “Song of Myself” to explore those ideas while preaching self-knowledge, liberty and acceptance for all. Above all, “Song of Myself” is a poem of incessant motion. Whitman is opposed to self-righteous judgments and feelings of guilt and shame about the body....   [tags: Democracy, United States, Walt Whitman, Life]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Of Grass And Don Delillo 's White Noise '

- Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and Don DeLillo’s White Noise were written over a century apart. In that time there was a significant change in the mentality between what it was to be an American and how much of a person’s identity was a part of their nationality. Over time, the American people have created a more negative outlook on society. While Whitman remains more positive and proud of being an American, DeLillo has adapted a more cynical perspective. There are several poems from Walt Whitman’s collection of Leaves of Grass that portray his particular belief in the American identity....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, Don DeLillo]

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Walt Whitman’s Children of Adam

- Walt Whitman’s "Children of Adam" Walt Whitman will forever live in the minds of individuals as one of America’s greatest poets. People in America and all over the world continue to read and treasure his poetry. He was an original thinker, contributing new modern styles to poetry. He was unafraid of controversy and uninhibited by what others may think of him. He created his own path in poetry, as he describes himself in an anonymous review of his poetry: "But there exists no book or fragment of a book which can have given the hint to them" (Whitman)....   [tags: Walt Whitman Children Adam Essays]

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Walt Whitman's Drum-Taps

- Walt Whitman's Drum-Taps - The Personal Record of Whitman’s Wartime Experiences Walt Whitman is one of America’s most popular and most influential poets. The first edition of Whitman’s well-known Leaves of Grass first appeared in July of the poet’s thirty-sixth year. A subsequent edition of Leaves of Grass (of which there were many) incorporated a collection of Whitman’s poems that had been offered readers in 1865. The sequence added for the 1867 edition was Drum-Taps, which poetically recounts the author’s experiences of the American Civil War....   [tags: Walt Whitman Drum-Taps Essays]

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Disparate Objects in Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass

- Reconciling Disparate Objects in Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass Walt Whitman begins this excerpt from Leaves of Grass by describing an elusive 'this': "This is the meal pleasantly set . . . . this is the meat and drink for natural hunger." These two clauses that are set next to each other describe 'this' as very different things. "A meal pleasantly set," evokes a quiet table in a genteel household. In contrast, "the meat and drink for natural hunger," recalls a more rugged table at which the food will be consumed after strenuous activity....   [tags: Walt Whitman Leaves of Grass]

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Walt Whitman 's Poem From Song Of Myself And When I Heard The Learn 'd Astronomer

- Walt Whitman’s Understanding of Himself and his Philosophy About Life in “from Song of Myself” and “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” The poems “from Song of Myself” and “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” written by Walt Whitman demonstrate the poet’s understanding of himself and his philosophy regarding life. Through these poems, Whitman is able to express his beliefs and values. When he was a young man, Whitman became involved with the Democratic Party. In both of these poems, we are able to distinguish his strong association to this....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, Leaves of Grass]

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Carl Sandburg and How He was Influenced by Walt Whitman

- Carl Sandburg and How He was Influenced by Walt Whitman Carl Sandburg and Walt Whitman had very similar lives. They both came from working class families and neither one of them went to high school or graduated college. They learned from watching people and by reading books on their own. They both had a certain sense for the world that made them able to see what was going on around them and grasp its significance. Although Whitman was born sixty years before Sandburg there were still a lot of the same things happening in America and they both picked up on one important factor of the time, that of the average working class man....   [tags: Carl Sandburg Walt Whitman Essays]

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Walt Whitman and the Civil War

- Walt Whitman is a famous poet in American history and the founder of free style of writing poem. He was well-known with his work of Leaves of Grass and Drum-Taps. Walt Whitman was inspired to write poems about Civil War and changed his style of writing after experiencing the horrible result of the war. Walt Whitman was born in West Hills, Long Island, on May 31, 1819. He is the second son of eight siblings in the family. In his early life, Whitman received a formal education until age of 11 because he needed to help his father to support the big family....   [tags: american history, poet, drum-taps]

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The Life and Works of Walt Whitman

- Poets write various styles of poetry. They use their own personal experiences, ideas, and creativity. Walt Whitman used all of these styles in his writings. He had experienced trials and tribulations throughout his whole life. Whitman did a lot of moving during his childhood, and that probably caused his personality to be neurotic. There are a lot of things that he has done to change the writings of future poets’. Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in Long Island, New York. He was the second son of Walter Whitman and Louisa Van Velsor....   [tags: Biography]

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Song of Mysel BY Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman was a man who has inspired and touched the lives of many people. Many have argued that Whitman is the most influential poet of America. He was born in New York into a working class family, on May 31, 1819. Walt Whitman was named after his liberal father who admired Thomas Paine. Whitman respected his father, but never quite felt as if they were close. His mother on the other hand, he saw her as a light and they shared many different emotions with each other. Whitman loved living near the East River where he could ride the ferries back and forth to New York City....   [tags: cosmology, death, hospitals]

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The American Soldier and Walt Whitman

- F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby sings the dirge of the illusions of the New World. The narrator Nick Carraway migrates from the American Midwest to New York to create a new life for himself; a life of prosperity, of happiness, and of independence. In other words, he moves to attain the American Dream. However, after observing the recklessness, the superficiality, the materialism, and the vice of those already living in New York, Nick realizes that the dream had been twisted into an ugly form....   [tags: Poetry, War, Poems]

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Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

- In his first anthology of poems entitled “Song of Myself”, Walt Whitman reveals some of his views on democracy through the use of symbolism and free verse poetry. His use of symbolism and free verse poetry creates indeterminacy, giving the reader hints rather than answers about the nature of the poem. In the sixth part of “Song of Myself”, a child asks the narrator of the poem, “What is the grass?” (Whitman). Instead of simply giving an answer, the narrator cannot make up his mind, and stumbles on how to explain the grass to the child....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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The Life of Walt Whitman

- The Life of Walt Whitman “Whitman seems to have had the theatrical flair of a con artist and the selfless dignity of a saint; the sensibility of an artist and the carefree spirit of a hobo; the blustery egotism of a braggart and the demure shyness of a shrinking violet.” (Holt Rine Hart and Winston 362). All these are statements make no sense at all but that was just how Whitman was. He wrote in ways you could never figure him out. He lived a life where he had to help his father support the family by getting a job instead of attending school....   [tags: American poet, journalist and essayist]

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Walt Whitman: Democracy At Play

- In 1855, Walt Whitman, an influential American poet published his first edition of his collection of poetry, Leaves of Grass, in which a controversial piece was included, “I Sing the Body Electric.” Whitman wrote the poem during the 19th century and pre civil war, within a free verse genre. Harold Bloom, an American critique and professor at Yale University, mentions in his book, Bloom’s How to Write about Walt Whitman, that equality is one of the central standards of the American society and that throughout most of Whitman’s life, “America struggled to fulfill the promise of equality for all” (Bloom 107)....   [tags: Poetry]

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Walt Whitman: An Omnisexual Poet

- The homosexual themes displayed in Walt Whitman’s works, especially in his most famous collection of poems Leaves of Grass, raise the question of his own sexuality. Many of his poems depicted affection and sexuality in a simple, personal manner, causing nineteenth century Americans to view them as pornographic and obscene. Based on this poetry, Whitman is usually assumed to be homosexual, or at least bisexual. However, this assumption does not account for major influences of his writing such as the shift from transcendentalism to realism and the American Civil War....   [tags: Leaves of Grass, homosexual, bisexual]

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Walt Whitman: The American Poet

- Walt Whitman was arguable one of the most influential poets during the Civil War era. Though never directly involved in war, Whitman was able to talk about the war in a more insightful way than many poets at the time could. Whitman was most active in writing during the times before and after the war, choosing to dedicate himself to helping wounded soldiers during the war instead. Walt Whitman’s poetry reflects the progression of his philosophy of America: his initial view of America was uplifting, represented in his Pre-Civil war poems and while the Civil War poetry presents the degradation of American society, Whitman’s final poetry returns to a realistic, optimistic view for America....   [tags: American Literature ]

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The Poetry of Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman is considered by many to be one of the greatest poets of the nineteenth century. Whitman grew up in New York and was a member of a large family, having eight siblings. Only four of these siblings lived to adulthood. His father was an alcoholic, which led to Whitman becoming more like a father-figure than a brother to his siblings. Whitman quit school at the age of eleven. He then worked as a journalist, as a carpenter, as a teacher, and as an editor before focusing on poetry. Whitman is most well-known for his book of poems, Leaves of Grass....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

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Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- In one of the sections from the poem, “Song of Myself” Walt Whitman starts out with a child asking a question, “What is the grass?” Grass is a symbol of life. God, who created both the heavens and the earth also gave birth to life. When Whitman refers to grass as a “handkerchief of the Lord” (7), as a gift. When people look at the grass, they do not think of it as a creation but rather just a plant. Whitman refers to the grass as “a child, the produced babe of vegetation” (11, 12). Here, the grass is a metaphor for the birth of a child....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Walt Whitman's Life and Accomplishments

- Born in Long Island, New York on May 31, 1819, Walt Whitman was the second of nine children born into a Democratic family (Benka). By eleven, Whitman ended his formal education and sought employment to financially support his family (Benka). He was able to acquire a job as an apprentice on the Long Island Patriot, where he was exposed to the printing trade and was able to discover his own style of writing (Benka). At age fourteen, Whitman was able to expand his knowledge of writing by working under the Patriot’s foreman editor William Hartshorne (Hall)....   [tags: civil war, leaves of grass, democratic family]

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Biography of Walt Whitman

- Thesis I. Walt Whitman is an American poet, journalist, and essayist whose Versace collection Leaves of Grass is a landmark in the history of American literature. Introduction II. He was born to a family that settled in North America in the first half of the 17th century. Also his family had owned a large tract of land. Therefore his family didn’t have it all they were not poor either. They were an average family. Body Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in West Hills Long Island N.Y... In 1823 they moved to Brooklyn....   [tags: poet, journalist, work, literature]

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Walt Whitman: Poetic Realist

- Walt Whitman – Poetic Realist Walt Whitman, one of the great American poets of the 19th and 20th centuries, was inspired to further his passion and talent for writing by what some would refer to as a call to action, by the writer Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emerson, known in his time as an “American Transcendentalist” writer, called poets of the mid 1800s into action with his essay entitled: “The Poet.” The fact that Walt Whitman, considered a realist poet, was inspired in part by this transcendentalist perfectly illustrates the constant progression of literary styles of that time....   [tags: transcendentalism, poetic analysis]

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Walt Whitman and Hanshan

- Poems by Walt Whitman and Hanshan feature strong enlightenment ideals and prevalent references to nature as a way to achieve these ideals. Though the two men lived in very different times, their works carry similar messages. Following the path to enlightenment generally refers to the Buddhist Eightfold Path, though it has been adapted over time to refer to the state of understanding a person reaches, both of oneself and his or her surroundings, as well as of that beyond what can be sensed. Relying solely on one’s talents and denying society and worldly possessions are typically seen as characteristics of an enlightened person, as seen in the writings of both Whitman and Hanshan....   [tags: enlightment ideals poetry]

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‘America’ by Walt Whitman.

- Walt Whitman is arguably America’s most influential poet in history. Born Walter Whitman in May 31st, 1819 to Walter Whitman and Louisa van Velsor, he was immediately nicknamed ‘Walt’ to distinguish him from his father. He came to life in West Hills on the famous Long Island, the second of nine children that grew up in Brooklyn. He came to be fondly known as ‘the Bard of Democracy’, mainly because that was a main message in his work. He is also celebrated as ‘the father of the free verse’. He was a liberal thinker and was vehemently against slavery, although later on he was against the abolitionists because, according to him, they were anti-democracy....   [tags: Poet, Poetic Analysis, History of Poem]

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‘America’ by Walt Whitman.

- Thesis statement When you look back, no American author is more influencing then Walt Whitman. He is celebrated as the father of free verse. We are going to take a look at just one poem and I hope you are as influenced as I am about this poem. It is called America. Whitman is deemed to be a successor to Shakespeare and Virgil. He arose from the Long Island and grew up in Brooklyn where he a small amount of formal education. During his life, he worked as a printer, editor, schoolteacher, and reporter....   [tags: History of Poem, Poet, Poetic Analysis]

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Song of the Open Road by Walt Whitman

- Classic journalist and poet, Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in West Hills, New York. His family financial background was of a meek proportion in comparison to its large size. Whitman’s commitment to the family catapulted him into employment at a very young age depriving him of a formal education in his adolescent years. The absence of a formal education was not a hindrance for the young Whitman; his self-education through reading and exploration of the written word eventually led him to his first teaching post at the very young age of seventeen, an unacceptable happening in todays 21st century....   [tags: Melodic Notes, Poetic Analysis, Literature]

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Egalitarianism in The Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

- Within Walt Whitman’s works he expresses his egalitarianism or belief in the equality of all people, especially in political, social, or economic life in his epic book called the leaves of grass. His strong point of view in the poem I Sing the Body Electric is expressed through sexuality, body attributes, political views. In the poem of I sing the body electric Walt Whitman expresses many qualities upon the body. It is as if he almost prizes them upon the glory that each attribute of a human being takes....   [tags: body electric, poem, man, women]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman And Emily Dickinson

- The poets Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson changed the world of poetry in the mid-nineteenth century with their profoundly different styles. Poetry before Whitman and Dickinson had the diction and poetic form of the contemporary British models, but a movement towards a strictly American expression in writing started to appear in the 1800s. Both poets broke free from the traditional styles with their own very distinctive techniques. Walt Whitman created a name for himself through his long, winding poems that seemed to lack structure and rhyme....   [tags: Poetry, Rhyme, Emily Dickinson, Half rhyme]

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Walt Whitman's Life and Career Path

- Born on May 31, 1819 in West Hills, Long Island, New York; Walter Whitman is considered one of the most influential poets in America. He is the second child of Walter and Louisa Whitman’s eight children. Walter was given the nickname Walt to distinguish him from his father. Walter started his life well off but had to sell his farmland; leaving the family struggling to regain some of their previous wealth. Walt often describes his childhood as nomadic and unhappy since he was being moved around for work opportunities for his father....   [tags: poet, published, imagery]

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Love By William Shakespeare, By Walt Whitman

- There had been many muses to the world of poetry, may it be a person or even a perception on life. Love is one that prevails all in the musings and perhaps there is a reason for that. While there are some that are cynical in the way of love and how it affects a person, love can have many positive effects on the mood and behavior of an enamored individual.With works from well known poets such as Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and even the bard himself, William Shakespeare, the subject of love jumps up from the pages as changing an individual....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, Sonnet, William Shakespeare]

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Walt Whitman: Homoeroticism in Leaves of Grass

- Leaves of Grass is Walt Whitman’s life legacy and at the same time the most praised and condemned book of poetry. Although fearful of social scorn, there are several poems in Leaves of Grass that are more explicit in showing the homoerotic imagery, whereas there are several subtle – should I say “implicit” – images woven into the fabric of the book. It is not strange, then, that he created many different identities in order to remain safe. What Whitman faced in writing his poetry was the difficulty in describing and resonating manly and homosexual love....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

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Comparing The Battle Whitman And Post War Whitman

- Comparison of pre-war Whitman and post-war Whitman Walt Whitman is considered one of the famous American writers who lived in the 19th century. The author is primarily known for his poetry, and also best known for his masterpiece, Leaves of Grass, which was published in 1855 as a collection of 12 poems. Whitman’s poems were different from those written during the era, and this is because they had a unique style, as well as a concentration of commonplace subjects. The use of commonplace subjects led to many people calling the author the “poet of democracy.” This paper compares Pre-war Whitman and Post-war Whitman....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass, Poetry]

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"Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" by Walt Whitman

- "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" by Walt Whitman Recurring Images and Motifs in "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" In the poem "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" by Walt Whitman, there are many recurring images and motifs that can be seen. Whitman develops these images throughout the course of the poem. The most dominant of these are the linear notion of time, playing roles, and nature. By examining these motifs and tracing their development, ones understanding of the poem becomes highly deepened. Whitman challenges the linear notion of time by connecting past with future....   [tags: Poem Poet Whitman Brooklyn Ferry Essays]

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Walter Whitman 's Leaves Of Grass

- Nationality in Walter Whitman’s Leaves of Grass The glamorization of American opportunity created a great sense of nationalism which encouraged many to embrace ideas like manifest destiny. Walt Whitman was a poet living in the nineteenth century who wrote many poems which figuratively painted a picture portraying enrichment and opportunity in America, and the greater opportunity which could be achieved through traveling west. One compilation of poems entitled Leaves of Grass, was quite influential to those living in America and abroad, catching the eye of many opportunists seeking a better future for themselves....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States, Nationalism]

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Ginsberg's Affinities with Whitman

- Although a century apart, Allen Ginsberg and Walt Whitman share similar cultural, political and moral values, which they express in their literary work. Whitman's writing is considered controversial for the 1800’s. He sets the stage for generations to come breaking way from the strict Victorian poetic tradition by writing in free verse. Ginsberg follows his footsteps, when composing “Howl" by writing in long prose like lines and subdividing the poem into several parts. Likewise, he uses numerous repetitions to achieve rhythmicity of his verse....   [tags: Allen Ginsberg, Walt Whitman, values]

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Walt Whitm An American Poet

- Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in the state of New York. He was the second child of Walter Whitman and Louisa Van Velsor. Walt grew up in a large family which consisted of 9 children. They lived in Brooklyn and Long Island for about twenty years. Self-taught and self-made, Whitman was an American poet who can be considered as one of the greatest poets to ever take ink to paper At only twelve years old, Whitman began to understand the basics of reading and writing and became passionate with the subjects....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

- Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman In the twentieth century, the name Walt Whitman has been synonymous with poetry. Whitman's most celebrated work, Leaves of Grass, was the only book he ever wrote, and he took a lifetime to write it. A large assortment of poems, it is one of the most widely criticized works in literature, and one of the most loved works as well. Whitman was unmarried and childless, and it has been noted that Leaves of Grass consumed him greatly; James E. Miller Jr. writes: "…he guided his poetic offspring through an uncertain, hesitant childhood, a lusty young manhood, and a serene old age…it is difficult to write the life of Whitman without writing instead of the...   [tags: Papers]

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The Utopian Vision of America, According to Walt Whitman

- Introduction What makes an individual an American is a question that has been asked time and again in many literatures. Some become Americans by birth, nationalization and other methods. However, there is still a question that has yet to be asked, would sharing the same vision and dream for America make one an American whether or not they live in America. In this research paper, the learner attends to this question by taking a keen look at the utopian vision of America through the eyes of Walt Whitman....   [tags: Social Studies]

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Walt Whitman: A Strong Minded and Anxious American Author

- ... Walt had an older brother, but he was in the army, so they couldn’t talk as much. He attended a public school in Brooklyn, with that being said, he didn’t have time to let anyone break his focus. Walt’s guardians often took him to see plays by William Shakespeare, because he always talked about being an editor or poet. William Shakespeare was a great influence on Walt, he learned that it took patience, respect, integrity, and being out and away from home very often. Whitman took in everything that he learned except the fact that he didn’t get away from the house a lot, he just stayed and wrote about his life, his parents, and the world he grew up in....   [tags: influential writers]

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A True Patriot: Walt Whitman

- A True Patriot: Walt Whitman When one talks of great American Poets, if the person has any since of intelligence, then they can in now way fail to mention Walt Whitman. Whitman is unmistakingly a great American poet, So great, that Ralph Waldo Emerson said that he was an “American Shakespeare” (Tucker 247). While the debate still goes on about that comment, there is no debate about the greatness of Whitman. Walt Whitman was born in West Hills, NY on May 31, 1819 on Long Island. He was the second of nine children....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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Religion in Walt Whitman's Literature

- Religion in Walt Whitman's Literature "Why should I pray. Why should I venerate and be ceremonious?……I find no sweeter fat than sticks to my own bones." (pg 40)Nature and all of her wondrous facets, especially the human body, was Whitman's religion. Walt Whitman was indeed an intensely spiritual man in his own unconventional way. His epic classic "Song of Myself" demonstrates these attitudes of his, and in his view how the proverbial "poet" of his America should believe. Humanity yearns for spiritual fulfillment and Whitman believed that everything around us and even ourselves were walking testaments to what true ethereal life is....   [tags: Papers]

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O Captain My Captain By Walt Whitman

- Emilio Mackie Mr. Webb English 11, Period 1 3-17-2015 O Captain My Captain Walt Whitman wrote the poem O Captain My Captain to honor the death of Abraham Lincoln in 1865. When the poem was published in the New York Saturday Press, the American public loved it. It became a national sensation overnight. Walt Whitman was asked to recite the poem so often, that he once said, “I’m almost sorry I ever wrote [it]” (Library of Congress) But this poem is not to be taken lightly. It speaks of a story about a captain, who returns with his crew after a hard voyage, only to lie in his deathbed in the end....   [tags: American Civil War, United States, Abraham Lincoln]

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The Spider and Soul in Walt Whitman's A Noiseless Patient Spider

- The Spider and Soul in Walt Whitman's A Noiseless Patient Spider Works Cited Not Included In “A Noiseless Patient Spider”, Walt Whitman compares the images of a spider creating a web to catch its prey to his own soul. In the first stanza, he describes the spider creating its web. In the second stanza, he begins to describe his own soul searching for something it needs. Throughout the poem, Whitman is relating the spider to the human soul by showing how both would pursue and capture what they need to continue to exist in this life....   [tags: Poetry Analysis Whitman Essays Papers]

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Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" Walt Whitman's 'Song of Myself' is, on the most basic descriptive level, a really long poem. Whitman is clearly a poet with a lot to say, or at least with a lot of different ways to say it. He meanders from the micro to the macro, from atoms to the whole earth. There are obviously myriad ways to explain what the poem is about, and myriad 'keys' to its true meaning. In what became Section 6 of the final edition (lines 90-121 of the 1855 edition ) Whitman himself addresses this sort of 'meta-question' of interpretation....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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`` Oh Captain My Captain `` By Walt Whitman

- Oh Captain In the poem “Oh Captain, my captain” was written by Walt Whitman. This poem was written in 1865 during the civil war and President Lincoln. Whitman admired Lincoln and would gave aid to the wounded soldiers. The writer is referring the war to a ship and is using nautical terms to describe the death of the president. Walt Whitman wrote four poems on the death of Abraham Lincoln. One of the four was “Oh captain, my captain” (Vendler 2). This poem is formally rhymed poem. In the first stanza Whitman is referring “O captain, my captain our fearful trip is done”, (Whitman 1) saying that the captain is Abraham Lincoln....   [tags: United States, Abraham Lincoln]

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Critique Of Whitman 's Pedagogy

- Critique of Whitman’s Pedagogy (A critique of Walt Whitman’s themes and ideas in Song of Myself 6, 46, 47) Pedagogy is a teaching style that is used to help students learn. Teachers often have a unique pedagogy that they prefer to follow. Some teachers prefer to lecture, others model, some simply assign the work, and to each their own. “…there is some evidence of teachers abandoning formal pedagogies in favor of informal ones…” (Cain). Walt Whitman was no different; he preferred a hands on approach when it came to teaching, and through his approach, he learned as much from the student as they did from him....   [tags: Teacher, Education, Walt Whitman, Song of Myself]

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Comparing the Works of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman

- In both Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman’s works, they emphasize some differences in their writing. In Dickinson’s works she shows that her works are short and simple poems, while Whitman’s poems and often long and complex. With Dickinson showing that her works are short and simple, while Whitman brings on a more sophisticated style, it truly shows that they use their own unique style of writing. In both Whitman and Dickinson works they have been known for being such unique artist and being original, while people try so hardly to impersonate their style, but they are unable to come close to accomplishing it....   [tags: poetry analysis, notorious American poets]

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Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Walt Whitman's Song of Myself This paper deals with Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" in relation to Julia Kristeva's theories of abjection--my paper does not point to abjection in the text, but rather the significance of the abscence of abjection. This abscence, looming and revolting, arises from Whitman's attemt to refigure a conception of sublimity which delimits the material which can trigger the sublime moment. Whitman's democracy of the sublime is inclusive of those figures on the American landscape, their lives and voices, which are functionalized into his world....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Walt Whitman’s Sensual Language in Leaves of Grass

- Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass covers many facets of human love, including love of the physical body. Whitman’s book contains many poems that try to embrace the beauty of the human body instead of covering it up. Whitman describes the human form in close detail throughout Leaves of Grass, but one of his poems in particular is especially vivid in detail. In “Children of Adam”, the fourth book of Leaves of Grass, Whitman gives readers a celebratory look at the human form. “I Sing the Body Electric” is one poem in particular that demonstrates how Whitman celebrates the human body through descriptive language of love and the human form and by elevating the human form to something more than a sim...   [tags: poems, human body]

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Emotions in O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman

- The poem, "O Captain. My Captain!" by Walt Whitman re-imagines the assassination of Abraham Lincoln by using emotions filled with shock and regret of losing a father figure. Walt Whitman has a patriotic attitude towards this poem as he describes Abraham Lincoln and all that he did for America by using imagery to develop a scene similar to the reality. The poet conveys his deep admiration for the achievements of Abraham Lincoln. Whitman shares his form by using a physical way of laying out and his attitude through the use of sound devices such as the iambic meter and the use of amphibrach....   [tags: abraham lincoln assassination, patriotic attitude]

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The Life of Walt Whitman: An Exploration in the Poet's Spirituality and Works.

- Many a student has decried various types of poetry for its form and structure while enjoying the free verse works of poets such as T. S. Elliot and Robert Frost. Students, however, frequently neglect the Civil War era poet Walt Whitman who is, to this day, considered the Father of free verse. While Whitman did not invent free verse, he secured its role in the American psyche. Even with his accomplishments, Whitman's life was not without trials; he concluded schooling and began working at age eleven....   [tags: Poetry]

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Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

- Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself While reading through the poem Song of Myself by Walt Whitman, what comes to your mind. His deep love for nature. The use of symbolism throughout the poem. Whitman’s questionable homoeroticism that seeps its way throughout the lines. What came to the forefront of mind when reading this poem by Whitman was his deliberately obvious theme of individuality while also maintaining a universal identity. I also think that Whitman throws in a common underlying theme of transcendentalism throughout his poem....   [tags: Individuality, Poem]

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Choosing Sides in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- “Song of Myself” is an attempt by Walt Whitman to become the “American poet” as described by Ralph Waldo Emerson; he attempts to be “[T]he sayer, the namer, and [representative] of beauty” (Emerson 1182). Whitman wants to speak to and for America. Whitman does not explicitly choose sides on the slavery debate that was raging at the time of his writing, but he does express the equality of all people, regardless of gender and race in “Song of Myself”. While Whitman’s writing can be read as neutral but “Song of Myself” is, in reality, very anti-slavery and pro-equality....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Analysis Of ' The Spider ' By Christina Rossetti And Walt Whitman

- P1: The purpose of this paper is to apply critical theory to literary texts in order to reflect on the interaction between the English major and the human condition. “Seekers- Coming Home,” explores the similarities of style and content between two poems, “Uphill” by Christina Rossetti and Walt Whitman’s “The Spider,” taking a formalist approach. Although both poems are very different in form, most notably the rhyme scheme, they both discuss metaphysical aspects such as the human soul and life beyond death, reflecting on the human condition....   [tags: Feminism, Sociology, Gender role, Patriarchy]

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The Sexual Nature of Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

- ‘To a stranger’ is a poem written by Walt Whitman, which was published as a part of the collection of his poems titled “Leaves of Grass”, in the year 1855. The sexual nature of the poems in this collection fuelled a great controversy at the time of its publication, and in 1865 he lost his government job as a result of the indecent behavior which his boss saw reflected in his works. In the “leaves of Grass” there is a separate cluster of poems called the “Calamus”, and “To A Stranger”, is a part of that cluster....   [tags: relationship, love, stranger]

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Walt Whitman's When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer

- Beauty is always in nature. It is express in many ways. In the poem “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” by Walt Whitman express the beauty in the stars. Just looking up in space gave him peace. Walt writes about the fascination of the stars. How the night sky can transform a situation. He writes experiencing this phenomenon first hand is better than having it told. In most cases, the real is better than the copy. The beauty of the experience is needed, and to see the real thing than what is told....   [tags: the expressive nature]

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758 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

I Sit and Look Out by Walt Whitman

- Every historical period has its own hero of the time. It can be an active businessman or a sensitive aristocrat that fits the time best. In the poem I Sit and Look Out, Walt Whitman describes the horrors of the oppressive age he was living in. However, he does not try to change the situation and only "sits and look out". The question is whether being a spectator is enough to make the life of the oppressed better. The author is the mirror of the cruel 19th century reality, and this is a huge step towards democratization of the overall situation in the society....   [tags: civil war, darwinist ideas, oppressive age]

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863 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

Walt Whitm The Perfect Poet For This Young Nation

- "But what merit is to repeat the old tricks, and hum the old tune. If man has the ability to make us feel the fitness, the necessity, the beauty of common things, he is a poet of the highest type.” (Walt Whitman Archive) This quote by George Santayana cited in the Whitman Archive perfectly defines the American poet Walt Whitman. One could say this 19th century craftsman, Walt Whitman, was the perfect poet for this young nation. He constructed a poetry with a less formal structure, utilized language of the common man, celebrated individualism, acknowledged cultural differences, was not bound by the past, was energized by the American move westward and its flourishing democracy, and was moved...   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, United States]

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1165 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

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