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The Elephant Man

- The Elephant Man John Merrick, a man so pathetic and helpless because of the curse of his extremely disfigured body he carries around with him. Lots of people are born with some deformity or another, but none such as the case of John Merrick, in other words, ‘The Elephant Man’ who was given this name because he was so deformed he resembled an extremely ugly elephant. The movie shows how John Merrick is marginalized not only by the general public, but also the poorest of people to such an extent that his life was a misery....   [tags: Elephant Man Essays]

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Bernard Pomerance and the Elephant Man

- Bernard Pomerance and the Elephant Man Bernard Pomerance was born in 1940 in Brooklyn, New York. He attended college at the University of Chicago, where he received a degree in English. In the 1970's Pomerance moved to London, England to become a novelist. He was unsuccessful and then decided to try his hand as a dramatist. He quickly got involved with several left-wing fringe groups, which where at the time thriving in England. Then, along with director Ronald Rees, he founded the Foco Nove Theater group....   [tags: Elephant Man Essays]

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Shooting an Elephant and The Man Who Would Be King

- Moral Authority and the Ultimate Fate of Imperialism The 1800’s staged the universal dissemination and climax of British imperialism, thereby destructing and reconstructing the world into a new order. It is ordinary to depict the British as overindulgent consumerists, and the natives as magnanimous servers of the Empire, though history suggests that imperialism was not a mere black and white affair. It is certain that imperialism unjustly exhausted global resources and is therefore deserving of its condemnation....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant Essays]

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The Elephant Man

- For everyone life is already hard enough. All anyone wants is to be accepted and to feel cared about but when you are unfortunately born with deformities life is a hundred times harder. According to his play The Elephant man Bernard Pomerance believes that society will shun those with deformities until they take the time to actually get to know them. John was a man shunned by society because he simply didn’t look like everyone else. He was born with a serious case of Elephantitis and was said to look like a monster....   [tags: Literature Analysis]

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Social Rejection in the Film The Elephant Man

- The Elephant Man is a moving film, based on the true story of Joseph Merrick, a man born with a prevalent deformity and dying from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this film, John Merrick is initially portrayed as an imbecile and is consequently placed in a circus freak show, where he is ridiculed as a result of his deformity and is abused by his manager. However, his life takes a turn for the better when he becomes acquainted with Dr. Treves and is introduced to a new lifestyle, dissimilar to what he had endured throughout his life....   [tags: prevalent, deformity, death, church, bag]

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Elephant Man

- Ashley Montagu tells John Merrick’s unusual story in the book that studies human dignity, The Elephant Man. The Elephant Man, an intriguing book that captures the heart of the spirit, is the story of a simple, yet unfortunate, man. It causes one to think about life’s precious gifts and how often they are taken for granted. As the sad and unique story of John Merrick, “the elephant man,'; unfolds, all are taught a lesson about strength and courage. When Sir Frederick Treeves first discovered John Merrick in 1884, he could only be described as, “a huddled mass of loneliness';(14)....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Elephant Man

- Elephant Man The Elephant Man, written by Bernard Pomerance, is a play about identity. It is a play about a man who is deformed, but constantly trying to live life as an ordinary person. The play begins with John Merrick, also known as the Elephant Man, performing in a carnival freak show in order to make a minute amount of money for living expenses. In Scene VI, Even on the Niger and Ceylon, Not This, Treves brings in Miss Sandwich to become Merricks nurse. He explains to her that he has been let down so far by the other nurses he has introduced to Merrick....   [tags: essays papers]

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George Orwell 's An Elephant Killed A Man

- George Orwell was a police officer who was hated by many people just for being European. One day he called to investigate an elephant that was tearing through the bazaar. By the time he tracked it down the elephant had killed a man, among other things. Followed by a large crowd he found the elephant peacefully eating grass outside of the village. Suddenly George Orwell faced a tough decision. He knew he shouldn’t kill the elephant but was afraid if he didn’t he would be laughed at and hated more than he already was....   [tags: High school, Secondary school, Jennifer Aniston]

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A Comparison of Dorian Gray and The Elephant Man

- Dorian Gray compared to The Elephant Man At the beginning of The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde, Basil paints a portrait of Dorian Gray. Throughout the novel, Dorian is viewed and is treated by the world as art. As art, Dorian is constantly changed by the influences of his different artists. The most influential and main artist of Dorian is Lord Henry. Lord Henry corrupts Dorian into a vain, selfish, arrogant, hedonistic, and cruel man. A similar artist to art relation exists between Mr....   [tags: essays papers]

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Comparing Evil in The Elephant Man, Romeo and Juliet, and Let the Circle Be Unbroken

- Comparing the Evil Exposed in Christine Sparks' The Elephant Man, William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, and Mildred Taylor's Let the Circle Be Unbroken       "Evil is the underlying element in the life of a living creature." This quotation, by Ray V. Sjorvek, expresses the idea that all living creatures contain a certain degree of evil inside themselves. In literature, protagonists usually express their sinister sides through words or actions when trying to prove the point that one's hidden emotions cannot be concealed....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Central Characters as Outsiders in Society in E.T. The Extra Terrestrial and the Elephant Man

- Central Characters as Outsiders in Society in E.T. The Extra Terrestrial and the Elephant Man Both films there are many similarities and differences between the directive strategies of Directors David Lynch and Steven Spielberg although it should be remembered that there is a theory that all stories derive from six basic plots. The directors have chosen characters that compare with the general feeling of the period for the two similar plots....   [tags: Papers]

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Shooting an Elephant by Geroge Orwell

- In his early twenties, George Orwell (1946) began a line of work he would later term “an unsuitable profession”: officer of the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, which began his transformation into a writer of primarily political topics. His essay “Shooting an Elephant” describes his feelings of frustration in attempting to perform his duty – shooting a mad elephant discovered to have broken its chain, destroyed property, and killed a man – while avoiding the ridicule of the local population. (Orwell, 1936) The elephant can be seen to represent a number of individuals and groups in the story, held by various chains in their different circumstances....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant Essays]

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True Power in "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell

- The quest for power is one which has been etched into the minds of men throughout history. However, it can be said that true power is not a result of one’s actions but comes from the following one’s own beliefs without being influenced by others. This principle sets up the story for Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell. The protagonist, Orwell himself, is a sub divisional police officer in Burma, a British colony. Orwell must try to find and use his inner power when he is faced with the decision of whether or not to kill an elephant which has ravaged the Burman’s homes....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant]

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Pride and Power in George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" and "A Hanging"

- Every writer has that one special quirk that keeps readers coming back for more. Whether it is the humor or the characters, most authors carry their quirks from story to story. In “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell describes his experience of shooting an elephant. In “A Hanging,” he describes the emotions that run through him as he watches the hanging of a prisoner. Both essays have similar key ideas that identify Orwell as a writer. The results of pride and power contribute to the themes that connect his essays and identify Orwell as a descriptive writer....   [tags: shooting an elephant, a hanging]

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Comparing George Orwell 's ' Stranger ' And ' Shooting An Elephant '

- James Baldwin and George Orwell Comparison The essay “Stranger in the village” by James Baldwin, and “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, share a similarity in their experience in a new environments. Orwell a British officer he was not warmly welcome, the Burmese people hated. As for Baldwin it is more of racism than hated. Both essays happen in unfamiliar places where there were racism and discrimination. They do not fit in with the natives and is judged because of their nationalities. However, the themes of these writing differ....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- George Orwell is a novel writer, born in India and have only spent five days there. Ida Mabel Limouzin, his mother, brought him and his sister too England while his father stayed in India. The novel Shooting an Elephant, that George wrote, took place in the bottom of Burma in the middle of Moulmein. The story is about George Orwell hesitating to kill an Elephant that has killed a man. All George planned to do was to test the elephant to see if it really meant any harm. George feels pressured by the crowd following him because they expect him to kill the elephant....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- The essay “Shooting an Elephant,” was written by George Orwell. Orwell was a British author best known for his essays and novels. In “Shooting an Elephant,” the title essay of his 1950 collection, Orwell is a British Police Officer in Lower Burma. After an elephant comes rampaging through the village in must, killing an Indian man, Orwell is looked upon to take care of the problem. The intense scene causes Orwell to make a crucial decision, reflecting on the vicious imperialism with the military in Burma during this time....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Being responsible is being accountable for your actions. If you are guilty of a certain situation, you are still responsible for your misdeed you caused. Confessing to your actions is a strong thing to do, but in the end you still did the crime and should still face the same consequences even if you didn’t confess. Orwell didn’t want to shoot the elephant, but he was scared how the townspeople would treat him if he didn 't shoot it. After he shot the elephant, he felt extremely guilty and took responsibility to confess his misdeed....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, Musth]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell Few supervisors experience lack of respect and denunciation from workers because of their positions in a company. Supervisors take actions to preserve the image of authority before subordinates and from being ridiculed by their workers, even if the supervisors object these types of actions. The essay "Shooting an Elephant" relates to this situation. The author of this essay is George Orwell. The author talks about his work and personal experience that emphasizes the impact of imperialism at the sociological and psychological stage....   [tags: Orwell Elephant Shooting Analysis]

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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" In 'Shooting an Elephant,' George Orwell finds himself in a difficult situation involving an elephant. The fate of the elephant lies in his hands. Only he can make the final decision. In the end, due to Orwell's decision, the elephant lay dying in a pool of blood. Orwell wins the sympathy of readers by expressing the pressure he feels as an Anglo-Indian in Burma, struggling with his morals, and showing a sense of compassion for the dying animal. Readers sympathize with Orwell because they can relate to his emotions in the moments before the shooting....   [tags: George Orwell Shooting Elephant]

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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism

- George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism   The glorious days of the imperial giants have passed, marking the death of the infamous and grandiose era of imperialism. George Orwell's essay, Shooting an Elephant, deals with the evils of imperialism. The unjust shooting of an elephant in Orwell's story is the central focus from which Orwell builds his argument through the two dominant characters, the elephant and its executioner. The British officer, the executioner, acts as a symbol of the imperial country, while the elephant symbolizes the victim of imperialism....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays Orwell ]

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Shooting An Elephant By George Orwell

- “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell “Shooting an Elephant” By George Orwell reveals the story of events during Orwell’s service as a sub-divisional police officer with the India Imperial Police, in Moulmein, Burma. “Shooting an Elephant” By George Orwell reflects Orwell’s emotions of hatred, bitterness, and guilt felt due to oppression of Imperialism. The story begins with Orwell explaining his deep hatred for the role he took place in during his service as a police officer in Burma. He was not happy within his daily routine and began to feel intense hatred towards the empire, he served, the Burma people (yellow faces) and with his deep smoldering emotions within himself....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant]

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George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Symbolism and Imperialism in “Shooting an Elephant” George Orwell dramatically writes about his time in Burma as an Imperial Officer in his essay “Shooting an Elephant”. He communicates in detail how he disagrees with the concept of imperialism but likewise dislikes the taunting Burmese community. Orwell goes on to recount the time an elephant rampages the village and how enlightening of an experience it was. Symbolism is a heavy orchestrator in this essay, with Orwell relating the concept of imperialism to several events such as the elephant’s rampage, the dead coolie, and the actual shooting of the elephant....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

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George Orwell 's Shooting An Elephant

- “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell “Shooting an Elephant” By George Orwell reflects Orwell’s emotions of hatred, bitterness, and guilt felt due to oppression of Imperialism in Moulmein, Burma; During Orwell’s service as a sub-divisional police officer with the India Imperial Police. The story begins with Orwell explaining his deep hatred for the role he took place in during his service as a police officer in Burma. He was not happy within his daily routine and began to feel intense hatred towards the empire he served, the Burma people (yellow faces) and with his deep smoldering emotions within himself....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant]

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The Elephant as a Symbol for Imperialism in "Shooting an Elephant”

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell retold an occasion where he was struggling to come to a final decision of whether to shoot the elephant or not. With his final decision, the elephant finally lay dying in front of thousands of people. He said that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he also explained that he had to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” in front of the crowd (14). At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case....   [tags: Symbolism, British, Orwell]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Symbolism in "Shooting an Elephant" George Orwell dramatically writes about his time in Burma as an Imperial Officer in his essay "Shooting an Elephant". He communicates in detail how he disagrees with the concept of imperialism but likewise dislikes the taunting Burmese community. Orwell goes on to recount the time an elephant rampages the village and how enlightening of an experience it was. Symbolism is a heavy orchestrator in this essay, with Orwell relating the concept of imperialism to several events such as the elephant 's rampage, the dead coolie, and the actual shooting of the elephant....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In the essay, "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell, the narrative includes almost no dialogue. Orwell 's voice as narrator is the only one readers hear. Orwell appears to have needed to empathize the inner conflict experienced by the narrator, who does not really want to shoot the elephant but feels compelled to do so to "avoid looking a fool." Ultimately, the requests and rationale of the government constrain individuals to act against their own ethical compasses. The absence of a dialogue is to emphasize the internal conflict experienced by the narrator....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell gives his opinion on imperialism when he says, “I was hated by large numbers of people—the only time in my life that I was I have been important enough for this to happen to me. I was sub-divisional police officer of the town, and in an aimless, petty kind of way anti-European feeling was very bitter” (1). The main sentences in his first paragraph indicate the terrible way of imperialism and its bit-by-bit destructive consequences for both sides of the condition....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, KILL, Shooting an Elephant]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- “Shooting an Elephant,” by George Orwell, is an interesting story at most. It incorporates politics, culture, reality and more while Orwell reflects on an experience in his past. This experience, a true experience, takes place in British Burma, while he was a part of the Imperial Police. Orwell, as the narrator, tells how he personally experienced the imperialism in Burma, and to coming upon an elephant ravaging a bazaar. Upon reading “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell uses three literary devices: tone, irony, and imagery....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, Irony]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Every day, each individual will look back on decisions he or she have made and mature from those experiences. Though it takes time to realize these choices, the morals and knowledge obtained from them are priceless. In George Orwell’s nonfictional essay, “Shooting an Elephant”, a young Orwell was stationed in Burma for the British imperial forces, tasked to deal with an elephant who destroyed various parts of the village Moulmein while its owner was away. Backed by second thoughts and a crowd of thousands, he finds himself shooting the elephant and reflecting that it was not justified; however, it was a choice pushed by his duty and the people....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant, Musth]

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Shooting an Elephant

- The art of telling a story relies on the language used. Whether a writer is good at using the language appropriately is vital for an interesting and impressive story. So how can the uses of appropriate language affect the whole narration of a story. George Orwell, one of the most famous English authors, was born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, India, in 1903. His father was a colonial official for the British and his mother’s family also had colonial ties. In 1922, Orwell worked as a British imperial policeman in Burma for five years but he finally returned to England again because he recognized the injustices of the British imperial rule in Burma and could not suffer the guilt of oppressing...   [tags: Literary Analysis, Orwell]

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Shooting An Elephant By George Orwell

- After analyzing the evidence shown in “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, it becomes evident that the victims in this essay are the Burmese. The British imperialised Burma and took control of the Burmese, which in result created a bitter Anti-European stigma within Burma. The Burmese were jailed, forced to cram in the ill kept cages of their lock-ups, and beat with bamboos. They were thought to be worthless, as the British claimed that “an elephant was worth more than any damn Coringhee coolie” (5)....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire, Imperialism]

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The Blind Men And The Elephant

- Perspective is a crucial aspect of anthropology, the study of humankind and the different aspects that affect human nature. There are four main subfields of anthropology that allow anthropologists to analyze different areas of human behavior. These subfields are as follows: biological or physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural or social anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. Each area of study is equally important and is able to be integrated into one idea that looks at the whole picture rather than the individual parts (“What is Anthropology?”)....   [tags: Anthropology, Sociology, Culture]

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Shooting An Elephant

- Shooting an Elephant In life we as humans often make decisions that we would not have made on our own if we would not have been influenced by someone else. As humans others' opinions mean a great deal to us, and in "Shooting an Elephant", Orwell shows how true this idea is by the tone of the story. "Shooting an Elephant" is the story of a British policeman in Moulmein, a city in Burma, that is torn between shooting or not shooting an elephant that has gone ramped. The native people did not like him much, but when the elephant went on its rampage they were quick to call on him....   [tags: George Orwell Literature Analysis Shooting Elephan]

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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - A Moral Dilemma

- A Moral Dilemma in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant Unanticipated choices one is forced to make can have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author recounts an event from his life when he was about twenty years old during which he had to choose the lesser of two evils. Many years later, the episode seems to still haunt him. The story takes place at some time during the five unhappy years Orwell spends as a British police officer in Burma. He detests his situation in life, and when he is faced with a moral dilemma, a valuable work animal has to die to save his pride....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]

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Power of the Oppressed in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- Power of the Oppressed Exposed in Shooting an Elephant     In Burma, the Indian Imperial Police consisted of British officers who, in theory, supported the extension of power and dominion of a nation, which is the basis of imperialism. George Orwell decided to follow family tradition when he went to Burma to work for the Indian Imperial Police, yet "when he realized how much against their will the Burmese were ruled by the British, he felt increasingly ashamed of his role as an alien police officer" (Britannica)....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]

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Media Manipulation Exposed in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- Media Manipulation Exposed in George Orwell's “Shooting an Elephant” The phrase “the power of the press” is used often, but what exactly is the power of the press. Since the beginning of news reporting, it’s been known that what actually gets into the news reports is monitored and carefully picked by higher authorities. What isn’t widely known, however, is that the media can use specific wording and phrases that, on the surface, look like normal news coverage, but are actually a technique of the media to control the images people see and the words they hear and read....   [tags: George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant]

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The Blind Men And The Elephant

- n India, there is an old story that tells the tale of six blind men and the elephant. The first blind man grabs the trunk and says the elephant looks like a snake, the second blind man grabs the elephant 's leg and disagrees, saying it actually looks like a tree. Neither of the men are technically wrong subjectively, but neither are absolutely right either. In management, what is most important aspect of business. Is it ensuring the highest product quality. Is it making sure everyone get 's a chance to voice their opinions....   [tags: Management, Management styles, Hierarchy]

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Speech On The White Elephant

- Addressing The White Elephant in the Room “If any man claims the Negro should be content…let him say he would willingly change the color of his skin and go to live in the Negro section of a large city. Then and only then has he a right to such a claim.” –Robert Kennedy * * * There weren’t sidewalks—there were only wooden planks that separated the overgrown ground from your feet. There any weren’t suburbs—only dilapidated housing that lined either side of a makeshift street. There weren’t any gardens of colored flowers—there was only green kudzu that grew unconstrained and strangled the surrounding vegetation....   [tags: Racism, Race, Race, Black people]

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Critical Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Critical Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell "Shooting an Elephant" is perhaps one of the most anthologized essays in the English language. It is a splendid essay and a terrific model for a theme of narration. The point of the story happens very much in our normal life, in fact everyday. People do crazy and sometimes illegal moves to get a certain group or person to finally give them respect. George Orwell describes an internal conflict between his personal morals and his duty to his country to the white man's reputation....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant George Orwell Essays]

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The Finale of Evil in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell faces a dilemma: whether or not to kill the elephant. With his final decision, the elephant finally lays dead in front of thousands of people. He explains that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he has to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” (14) in front of the crowd. At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case. He effectively uses this incident to demonstrate the “real nature of imperialism” (3), where the elephant represents the British Empire....   [tags: Imperialism, Analytical Essay]

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George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- British author George Orwell was born in India and, after receiving his education in England, spent five years as an officer of the India Imperial Police from 1922 to 1927. In his essay titled “Shooting an Elephant”, Orwell reflects on a specific incident during his term as an Imperial officer which he claims gave him a deeper understanding of the evil nature of imperialism. Orwell explains the negative relationship between Europeans and the Burmese, and provides vivid imagery along with his point of view to identify the evil motive behind imperialism: pride....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, British Empire]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The Lottery '

- A successful descriptive narrative gives the necessary information for a reader to know the material of a text. For instance, narrating the text of a story allows the audience to connect with the feelings of the narrator. A description incorporates visuals so that the audience can recognize the image being portrayed. “Shooting an Elephant” and “The Lottery” are both descriptive narratives. Descriptive narratives give the reader a clearer understanding of the passage. “Shooting an Elephant” is the stronger descriptive narrative because of vivid sensory detail, manipulating the perception of the reader, and Orwell’s use of conflict....   [tags: Narrative, Narrative mode, Narrator, Burma]

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The Use of Metaphors in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- The Use of Metaphors in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell In the essay ?Shooting an Elephant. by George Orwell, the author uses metaphors to represent his feelings on imperialism, the internal conflict between his personal morals, and his duty to his country. Orwell demonstrates his perspectives and feelings about imperialism.and its effects on his duty to the white man?s reputation. He seemingly blends his opinions and subjects into one, making the style of this essay generally very simple but also keeps it strong enough to merit numerous interpretations....   [tags: Shooting Elephant George Orwell Essays Papers]

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A Story Of Three Blind Men And An Elephant

- There is a story of three blind men and an elephant. Each man touches a different part of the elephant to learn what an elephant is. One man touches the trunk and defiantly says that the “animal is similar to a snake; it is long and round, and very strong.” Another touches the leg; it “resembles two big trees without any branches” he says. The third man touches the tail of the elephant. This man proclaims that an elephant is “like a straw fan swinging back and forth to give us a breeze.” Finally, the men come together to compare their experiences....   [tags: Religion, Christianity, Philosophy of religion]

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George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- George Orwell 's "Shooting an Elephant is a multifaceted essay that sheds light on the negative connotations that lie within Imperialism specifically in Burma, India. In Orwell 's writing he always finds a way to tackle prominent issues and mask them within stories that leave the reader thinking but without knowing, some examples of his works being his critically acclaimed novels Animal Farm and 1984. In “Shooting an Elephant”, he illustrates through a first person narration the actions of a British officer in Burma India and alludes that the title holds more than just “shooting an elephant.” Orwell shows the narrator and his inner turmoil in the face of the killing of an elephant in Burma a...   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Imperialism]

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Analysis of The Elephant Vanishes by Harucki Murakami

- ... In the 20th century, Japan experienced an American enculturation. In the story, the main character works as a salesman of kitchen equipment presumably for an American corporation; that is why, he must use the word “kitchen” instead of the Japanese word. (Goossen 409). This implies the process of Americanization and at the same time the break with the Japanese traditional culture. This is very difficult to understand because it is a traumatic process in which the Japanese society had to renounce the deeply rooted traditions and substitute them for others....   [tags: japanese, literature, tradition, society]

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George Orwell 's Shooting An Elephant

- Sit. Stay. Shake. Speak. These are all commands that someone would voice to a dog, and expect it to follow accordingly. Dogs are known for their obedience and unbroken loyalty. They would do anything to please their masters; even put their selves in dangerous positions just to satisfy their authoritative masters. The question at hand is, would a human act just as obedient, no matter the circumstances. Some may deny that humans would be as accommodating as man’s best friend, but just a glimpse at past history could reveal otherwise....   [tags: McCarthyism, Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow]

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Shooting An Elephant

- The story that my evaluation will be based on is Shooting an Elephant written in 1936. The author George Orwell was born in 1903 in India to a British officer raised in England. He attended Eton College, which introduced him to England’s middle and upper classes. He was denied a scholarship, which led him to become a police officer for the Indian Imperial in 1922. He served in Burma until resigning in 1927 due to the lack of respect for the justice of British Imperialism in Burma and India. He was now determined to become a writer, so at the brink of poverty he began to pay close attention to social outcasts and laborers....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Shooting an Elephant

- “Shooting an Elephant” I was not comfortable with many aspects of this story. The prejudice throughout the book was unimaginable, I find I am uncomfortable with any kind of bigotry. Reading of the Burmese people and their disrespect toward someone who was there to “protect and serve”, was difficult. I suppose I am naïve, I try to hold on to the belief that people of God are inherently good. I know there are bad apples in all walks of life, bad people are everywhere so holding on to this optimism is harder each day....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Shooting an Elephant

- A police officer in the British Raj, the supposedly 'unbreakable'; ruling force, was afraid. With his gun aimed at a elephant's head, he was faced with the decision to pull the trigger. That officer was George Orwell, and he writes about his experience in his short story, 'Shooting an Elephant';. To save face, he shrugged it off as his desire to 'avoid looking the fool'; (George Orwell, 283). In truth, the atmosphere of fear and pressure overwhelmed him. His inner struggle over the guilt of being involved in the subjugation of a people added to this strain, and he made a decision he would later regret enough to write this story....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Hills like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway

- Symbolism in Hemingway’s Story ‘Hills like White Elephants’ ‘Hills Like White Elephants’ is a short story authored by Ernest Hemingway about an American and a girl named Jig. In the story, the two are sitting in a train station waiting for the train to Madrid. While they wait, they have an intense ongoing debate on whether or not to abort Jig. At the end of the story, the train is about to arrive and the man carries luggage on the tracks as they prepare to leave. The end of the story does not clearly define the outcome of its decision....   [tags: symbolism, white elephant]

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Analytical Summary Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ... On his way, he hears that the elephant that was causing trouble was actually a tamed elephant that went mad due to ‘must.’ He also learns that it had already wreaked massive havoc among the Burmese villages. Upon his arrival, he is perplexed at the conflicting testimonies of the natives, making him think that this incident is just a hoax. At that very moment, he sees a corpse of man that the elephant had trampled upon. Realizing the severity of the situation, he sends an orderly to get an elephant rifle and heads towards a paddy field where the elephant rests, followed by a large crowd of people....   [tags: imperialism, wishes, essay, officer]

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George Orwells Shooting an Elephant

- George Orwells Shooting an Elephant In George Orwell's essay "Shooting An Elephant," he writes about racial prejudice. Orwell is a British officer in Burma. The author is, "for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British"(842). Orwell feels caught in the middle of this cultural struggle. He sympathizes with the oppressed people of India, but is treated poorly, since he is viewed as one of the oppressors. He comes to terms with the role he plays in this vicious cycle of oppression , as an imperial servant, and the influence it has on him to shoot an elephant....   [tags: essays papers]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell In his essay Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell explains how the controlling authorities in a hostile country are not controlling the country's population but are in fact a mere tool of the populous. Orwell's experience with the elephant provided the insight for his essay, and gives a clear example of the control the natives have over the authorities. The authorities in Lower Burma were there to police the state that their government controlled, but were only accomplished in being controlled by the people of the state....   [tags: Papers]

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Literary Analysis of “Shooting an Elephant,” by George Orwell

- ... Part five is the last paragraph, he tells us about why that he had to kill the elephant. At the beginning, Orwell claims that he is fully against the Imperialism and he describes it as “devil”. O well’s point is to use the image of the elephant as a metaphor to demonstrate the destructive and unethical power of the Imperialism. We can see the destruction of imperialism when Orwell depicts “An elephant was ravaging the bazaar” ()and “It had already destroyed somebody’s bamboo huts, kill a cow and raided some fruit-stalls and devoured the stock;” ()....   [tags: metaphor, imperialism, imagery]

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Free Will in Shooting an Elephant and Antigone

- Free Will in Shooting an Elephant and Antigone Free will can be defined as: “The right, given to humans by God, to make their own decisions.” A mans free will cannot be destroyed by any power other than God. Humans can always exercise their free will when making decisions. However, when their decisions come in conflict with the laws set by a higher power, they might face consequences based on how they choose to use their free will. The more restrictions imposed upon someone’s free will the more restricted their ability to make decisions become....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- What to Follow: Ethics or Morals, Although ethics and morals are distinct knowledge from each other, people use the terms as if they are interchangeably because these words have shared a similar belief about what right and wrong. However, ethics define as a set of rules which come from an external sources like social system that tell people what right and wrong while morality refer to an individual’s internal principals that decide what good and bad. Conflicting in between ethics and morality hurt people in their career and every day decision making in every workplace....   [tags: Morality, Ethics, Virtue, Moral psychology]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- “All I can do is follow my instincts, because I 'll never please everyone.” -Emma Watson. Trying to please everyone will lead to a person being unhappy, because no matter how hard you try, can’t make everyone happy. When making a decision, the only person that can really tell me what is right for me is, me. No one knows how a decision will affect me in the future, economically, or even emotionally. At times decision can be made more difficult when everyone thinks that they know what is better and try and push me in the right direction “because I have been where you are before” which in my opinion can’t be true....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Cognition, Emotion]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”, the author describes how he is in a very special and difficult circumstance. The background information he provides in the introduction explains how he was born and raised in India, but attended school in England. Soon after, he became an officer for the English government but was stationed over in India during their imperialistic reign. This knowledge is essential to the reader in understanding Orwell’s thoughts and emotions while reading. Throughout the story, symbols such as the rifle, the elephant, and even Orwell himself represent the British’s power over the people, the evils of imperialism, and the slow decline of the British empire....   [tags: British Empire, Imperialism, Burma, Empire]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” deals with the nature of a human’s identity and ego. The story is set during the British colonization of Burma and discusses the ordeals of an English police officer stationed in the colony, who hates both his job and the people whom he polices. He faces many challenging decisions that put him in a place where he must either follow his own beliefs or fall to the will of the citizens of Burma. Throughout the story the officer is stuck with the decision of whether to do what he thinks is right, in order to preserve his ego or to do what the majority wants, in order to preserve his public identity....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Hatred]

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Critical Analysis of Hemmingway’s The White Elephant

- “Hills Like White Elephants” the short story written by Ernest Hemingway, presents the difference between man and woman’s attitude toward a relationship when it becomes responsible. The conflict arises where the girl wants to keep the baby when the man asks her to have an abortion. The man tells the girl that he loves her through whole story, but does not want anyone or anything to get involved in their relationship. The man is irresponsible, improvisational, and manipulative; overall he is immature and showing childish attitude but the girl tries to become responsible and mature....   [tags: Relationship, Abortion]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Power Struggle in Shooting an Elephant In the essay Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell, the ideas of power, imperialism and the struggle of the British Empire are the central themes in the text. The essay is based on Orwell’s personal experience with the imperial police and the British Empire in Burma. The text begins when Orwell is expressing how much he is hated by the locals in Burma, how he was always taunted, made fun of, and laughed at. One day, he got a call saying there was an elephant that had broken its chain and escaped....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, the narrator is the main character of the story trapped in his own environment between righteousness and authority. He is unsure of his path on whether to defend the people of Burma from the oppression of the British ruling in which he serves that can lead him to losing his job as sub-divisional town of Burma, India. Orwell personally relates to the narrator that is reflected in his writing allowing the reader to get a glimpse of his political views. In the short story Orwell like the narrator was an Anglo-Indian official, a term used to describe all British people of mixed Indian and British descent....   [tags: British Empire, United Kingdom, British Raj]

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An Exploration of British Injustice in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ... This phrase shows not only how the people oppressed by the Imperialism suffer, but the tyrant itself by giving up his freedom. Through the way Orwell arrange this paragraph the audience can now truly understand Orwell’s argument about how Imperialism has negative effects on those in the power, and how ironically it is for Orwell to gain power and dominance over others, just to lose freedom and dominance over yourself. Through the essay, with the use of particular emotional words and sentences, the audience can perceive Orwell’s feelings and emotions, by the memorable amount of pathos over his essay....   [tags: imperialism, control, pressure]

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Shooting an Elephant

- In the essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer in Lower Burma, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. Since “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to the British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma, Orwell is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese (12). This allows him to hate his job and the British Empire. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Orwell]

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Shooting an Elephant

- In his essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. He hates his job as a police officer in Moulmein because an “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma. Therefore, Orwell, a white man is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese which allows him to hate his job and British Empire, the root of everything. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13)....   [tags: Analysis, George Orwell]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ‘Shooting an Elephant’ is a short story written by George Orwell in 1936. The story is about a young British man who serves as a police officer in Burma, which is part of British India in the 1920s. This policeman is torn between his hate for the British occupation and the abuse he gets from the natives on a daily basis. Politically, he is on the Burmese side because he despises the oppressive British rule in Burma. Even though he is against the occupation, he has to act superior over the natives in order to maintain British power over the land....   [tags: short story, British oppression in Burma]

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Personal Statement : Blind Men And An Elephant By John Godfrey Saxe

- My choice to become a teacher was not made lightly. This decision was a culmination of a process of reflection about what I wanted to do with my life. I have chosen a career in education because I believe that it is one of the most important functions performed in our culture. I believe that teachers individually and collectively have the ability to not only change the world, but to improve it. Within the process of teaching, I hope to find both personal and professional renewal. I want to be a part of a noble profession with the hope of one day being counted among those in whom future teachers find inspiration....   [tags: Education, Teacher, Knowledge]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell, Brief Description of Words and Symbols

- 1. From the beginning of this essay Orwell’s purpose was never to shoot the elephant. In paragraph 3, lines eight through nine he explains not wanting to shoot it and speaks about bringing the gun to give the elephant a good fright. Leaving the gun at home or bringing the gun would have made no difference to what happened at the end. The gun was of little use, the main gun was not even his own but the riffle. 2. Orwell shot the elephant not to save the people in the village but for his own benefits....   [tags: irony, epiphany, coolie]

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Brutal Honesty Hits The Unsuspecting Mark. Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Brutal Honesty Hits the Unsuspecting Mark The memorial account George Orwell details, of his confrontation with an elephant gone mad, in his essay, Shooting An Elephant (1946) is engaging and thought provoking. Born in 1903, in Bengal, India to a British Colonial civil servant, Orwell states in his most powerful essay against imperialism, “I perceived in this moment that when the white man turns tyrant it is his own freedom that he destroys,” (Orwell, 1946, para.7). In a disarmingly musing, sort of style, Orwell makes his point....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, British Empire]

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Summary Of ' An Elephant Versus A Mouse '

- Tyler Ennis Dr. Marion English 112/FJT12 8 October 2015 An Elephant Versus a Mouse English courses are taught many different ways, starting in kindergarten all the way through college. However the number of books students are required to read, the papers, format and grammar all seem to have a little variant from teacher to teacher. While English is a class to focus all of these things and more. English encompasses history as well; as much history can be learned in an English class as a History class, this is important....   [tags: Great Depression, Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck]

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Elephants And Its Effects On The World

- On Eating Elephants The largest land animal on Earth can stand up to 13 feet tall and weigh up to 15,400 pounds, yet it is still a vulnerable creature. Perhaps this is because it has one of the largest hearts in the world, weighing up to 46 pounds. This shows in the creature’s endangerment and its compassion. Elephant populations have decreased rapidly in recent decades, primarily to habitat loss and ivory poachers. Elephants also experience emotions such as anger, joy, and grief. Perhaps the most astounding, though logical, example of the elephant’s vulnerability is its avoidance of certain acacia trees because of the ants that live on them....   [tags: Elephant, Asian Elephant, Elephants, Fozzie Bear]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' Civil Disobedience ' By Harlan Ellison And ' Shooting An Elephant '

- The world roughly hold about seven billion people. People from different backgrounds, nationality, race, but there is a high percentage of people in this world that struggle to make moral decisions on their own because they are scared of becoming an outcast, an enemy. In addition, this cycle causes people to be controlled by the society and not make decisions that would possibly better them but rather turn them into the society’s robot. In essays such as, “‘Repent Harlequin’ Said the Ticktock Man” and “Shooting an Elephant,” written by Harlan Ellison and George Orwell, respectively, each character faces a conflict with themselves by not using their own moral sense and getting faced with chal...   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, Civil disobedience]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The War Prayer '

- Imperialism, is it the big, bad master who enslaves the good, little child or is it the good, big master who protects the bad, little child. As history has shown in the past; sometimes, it is both. Through examination of three important pieces of literature “Shooting an Elephant by G. Orwell, White Man’s Burden by R. Kipling, and The War Prayer by M. Twain, it becomes obvious that there are serious consequences in supporting imperialistic ideals. Three very important ideas about Imperialism can be gleaned from these writings, which then provide a distinct concept about the subject....   [tags: British Empire, Colonialism, Imperialism, Empire]

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George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”, Orwell priorities the abuse of the Burmese people by the British Empire. Orwell uses the shooting of the elephant to the plight of the Burmese people and their unbroken will in some civil disobedience. The elephant represents a defiance of the British Empire. Also since he was seen as the figured head of the state he had to take action or ruin not only his own standings with the crowd but also with the face of the British Empire. When Orwell starts the essay he tells us how he was hated by the people....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire]

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Colonialism and Imperialism Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness

- Destructive Colonization Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness       As a man is captured, his first instinct is to try and break free from his shackles and chains. Primal urges such as this often accompany humans when they are forced, as in capture, to rely on their most basic instincts to survive. In this manner, natives in Africa acted upon instinct when the Europeans arrived to take their land and freedom. The short story Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell and the novel Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad revolve around the time when colonialism had a foothold in many parts of the world....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Descriptive Narrative Of ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The Lottery '

- A successful descriptive narrative displays the necessary information for a reader to explain or develop speculations within the material. Narrating the text of a story, told through one or more narrators, allows the audience to connect with the feelings of the narrator. A description includes imagery for the audience’s recognition. Furthermore, descriptive narratives have a purpose and are there for a reason. “Shooting an Elephant” and “The Lottery” are both descriptive narratives. Descriptive narratives show a clearer understanding of the passage; therefore, the stronger text is “Shooting an Elephant” because of its detail and the plot’s conflict....   [tags: Narrative, Narrative mode, Narrator, Narratology]

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The Effects of Groupthink

- Everyday a war is being waged, not in foreign countries- but in small neighborhoods and capital cities all over the world. A timeless battle to retain individual thought and action in an increasingly conformist society. The concept of a unanimous group-thinking society can be witnessed throughout history in the form of political controversies to pop culture and trends, to subtle influences in everyday life. The short narrative “Shooting an Elephant” written by George Orwell is a perfect example of group-thinking that implicates that to be accepted into these societal groups, one must do what is right by them, and not by the individual....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell]

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The Elephant vanishes

- In “The Elephant Vanishes Stories” by Haruki Murakami, he uses a mixture of fantasy and reality to engage the reader into the main idea of object or people disappearing. Most of his stories may seen as if they came from life but he adds mystery to each one of them when something is missing or vanishes and the circumstances around it becomes unreal. In “The Wind-Up Bird and Tuesday’s Women” Murakami starts off by surrounding the plot around a man who quits his job for no apparent reason at all, who irons his shirts in a particular manner, and avoid the sexual urges of a woman....   [tags: essays research papers]

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