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Shooting an Elephant by Geroge Orwell

- In his early twenties, George Orwell (1946) began a line of work he would later term “an unsuitable profession”: officer of the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, which began his transformation into a writer of primarily political topics. His essay “Shooting an Elephant” describes his feelings of frustration in attempting to perform his duty – shooting a mad elephant discovered to have broken its chain, destroyed property, and killed a man – while avoiding the ridicule of the local population. (Orwell, 1936) The elephant can be seen to represent a number of individuals and groups in the story, held by various chains in their different circumstances....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant Essays]

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True Power in "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell

- The quest for power is one which has been etched into the minds of men throughout history. However, it can be said that true power is not a result of one’s actions but comes from the following one’s own beliefs without being influenced by others. This principle sets up the story for Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell. The protagonist, Orwell himself, is a sub divisional police officer in Burma, a British colony. Orwell must try to find and use his inner power when he is faced with the decision of whether or not to kill an elephant which has ravaged the Burman’s homes....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant]

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The Effect of Respect on Morality Depicted in The Guest and Shooting an Elephant

- The prevailing theme in The Guest and Shooting an Elephant is the effect of respect on morality. In the former, the main character Daru exhibits a great deal of respect and hospitality to the Arab, especially considering the circumstances. In the latter, the Burmans exhibit no respect to the police officer in the event of the elephant display, or in his day to day life. These opposite scenarios have a distinct effect on the morality of the main characters. Respect has a distinct effect on morality which differs depending on if respect is being strived for or shown....   [tags: The Guest and Shooting an Elephant]

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Pride and Power in George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" and "A Hanging"

- Every writer has that one special quirk that keeps readers coming back for more. Whether it is the humor or the characters, most authors carry their quirks from story to story. In “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell describes his experience of shooting an elephant. In “A Hanging,” he describes the emotions that run through him as he watches the hanging of a prisoner. Both essays have similar key ideas that identify Orwell as a writer. The results of pride and power contribute to the themes that connect his essays and identify Orwell as a descriptive writer....   [tags: shooting an elephant, a hanging]

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Shooting an Elephant and The Man Who Would Be King

- Moral Authority and the Ultimate Fate of Imperialism The 1800’s staged the universal dissemination and climax of British imperialism, thereby destructing and reconstructing the world into a new order. It is ordinary to depict the British as overindulgent consumerists, and the natives as magnanimous servers of the Empire, though history suggests that imperialism was not a mere black and white affair. It is certain that imperialism unjustly exhausted global resources and is therefore deserving of its condemnation....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant Essays]

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Comparing George Orwell 's ' Stranger ' And ' Shooting An Elephant '

- ... He started his essay by claiming a perspective on British Imperialism. He said that it is evil and against oppressors. He feels hatred and guilt toward both himself and “The evil-spirited little beasts” as he refers to the Burmese people. (195) His essay was base around his experiences with the people and the shooting of an elephant. As he face the elephant and the Burmese to show his courage as an officer. In the Swiss village Baldwin feels like he is discriminated. His feels lonely toward the Swiss villager....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" In 'Shooting an Elephant,' George Orwell finds himself in a difficult situation involving an elephant. The fate of the elephant lies in his hands. Only he can make the final decision. In the end, due to Orwell's decision, the elephant lay dying in a pool of blood. Orwell wins the sympathy of readers by expressing the pressure he feels as an Anglo-Indian in Burma, struggling with his morals, and showing a sense of compassion for the dying animal. Readers sympathize with Orwell because they can relate to his emotions in the moments before the shooting....   [tags: George Orwell Shooting Elephant]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- ... At times, even though Orwell is quite civil, hatred tones for the imperialism and the British tend to make an appearance. For example, “As for the job I was doing, I hated it more bitterly than I can perhaps make clear. In a job like that you can see the dirty work of empire at close quarters.” (Orwell 910). This causes Orwell to also feel conflicted, another tone, as he “Theoretically and secretly, of course-” (910). sympathizes the Burmese even though they can be “...perplexing and upsetting.” (910)....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, Irony]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Every day, each individual will look back on decisions he or she have made and mature from those experiences. Though it takes time to realize these choices, the morals and knowledge obtained from them are priceless. In George Orwell’s nonfictional essay, “Shooting an Elephant”, a young Orwell was stationed in Burma for the British imperial forces, tasked to deal with an elephant who destroyed various parts of the village Moulmein while its owner was away. Backed by second thoughts and a crowd of thousands, he finds himself shooting the elephant and reflecting that it was not justified; however, it was a choice pushed by his duty and the people....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant, Musth]

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Society's Influence on People Depicted in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant and Lucy Grealy's Mirrors

- Throughout the ages, people have at times been influenced by society to do things they would not normally do. There are people who have been influenced to do things they did not desire to do at the behest of others, simply to be accepted by their peers. The choices that are made in life affect you either way even if they were made by you or someone else. Each choice made has a consequence which will affect the individual and in return the decision will produce a particular outcome. Influence is a hard thing to calculate into someone’s life and seeing how it changes lives for better or for worst is very difficult....   [tags: shooting an elephant, mirrors]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell Few supervisors experience lack of respect and denunciation from workers because of their positions in a company. Supervisors take actions to preserve the image of authority before subordinates and from being ridiculed by their workers, even if the supervisors object these types of actions. The essay "Shooting an Elephant" relates to this situation. The author of this essay is George Orwell. The author talks about his work and personal experience that emphasizes the impact of imperialism at the sociological and psychological stage....   [tags: Orwell Elephant Shooting Analysis]

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Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell George Orwell's essay 'Shooting an Elephant' gives remarkable insight into the human psyche. The essay presents a powerful theme of inner conflict. Orwell feels strong inner conflict between what he believes as a human being, and what he believes and should do as an imperial police officer. The author is amazingly effective in illustrating this conflict by providing specific examples of contradictory feelings, by providing an anecdote that exemplified his feelings about his situation, and by using vivid imagery to describe his circumstances....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant George Orwell Essays]

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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism

- George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism   The glorious days of the imperial giants have passed, marking the death of the infamous and grandiose era of imperialism. George Orwell's essay, Shooting an Elephant, deals with the evils of imperialism. The unjust shooting of an elephant in Orwell's story is the central focus from which Orwell builds his argument through the two dominant characters, the elephant and its executioner. The British officer, the executioner, acts as a symbol of the imperial country, while the elephant symbolizes the victim of imperialism....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays Orwell ]

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Moral Issues and Decisions in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- Moral Issues and Decisions in Shooting an Elephant    Throughout "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell, he addresses his  internal battle with the issues of morality and immorality. He writes of several situations that show his immoral doings. When George Orwell signed up for a five-year position as a British officer in Burma he was unaware of the moral struggle that he was going to face. Likewise, he has an internal clash between his moral conscious and his immoral actions. Therefore, Orwell becomes a puppet to the will of the Burmese by abandoning his thoughts of moral righteousness....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]

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George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - A Moral Dilemma

- A Moral Dilemma in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant Unanticipated choices one is forced to make can have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author recounts an event from his life when he was about twenty years old during which he had to choose the lesser of two evils. Many years later, the episode seems to still haunt him. The story takes place at some time during the five unhappy years Orwell spends as a British police officer in Burma. He detests his situation in life, and when he is faced with a moral dilemma, a valuable work animal has to die to save his pride....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]

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Power of the Oppressed in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- Power of the Oppressed Exposed in Shooting an Elephant     In Burma, the Indian Imperial Police consisted of British officers who, in theory, supported the extension of power and dominion of a nation, which is the basis of imperialism. George Orwell decided to follow family tradition when he went to Burma to work for the Indian Imperial Police, yet "when he realized how much against their will the Burmese were ruled by the British, he felt increasingly ashamed of his role as an alien police officer" (Britannica)....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]

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Media Manipulation Exposed in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- Media Manipulation Exposed in George Orwell's “Shooting an Elephant” The phrase “the power of the press” is used often, but what exactly is the power of the press. Since the beginning of news reporting, it’s been known that what actually gets into the news reports is monitored and carefully picked by higher authorities. What isn’t widely known, however, is that the media can use specific wording and phrases that, on the surface, look like normal news coverage, but are actually a technique of the media to control the images people see and the words they hear and read....   [tags: George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant]

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Critical Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Critical Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell "Shooting an Elephant" is perhaps one of the most anthologized essays in the English language. It is a splendid essay and a terrific model for a theme of narration. The point of the story happens very much in our normal life, in fact everyday. People do crazy and sometimes illegal moves to get a certain group or person to finally give them respect. George Orwell describes an internal conflict between his personal morals and his duty to his country to the white man's reputation....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant George Orwell Essays]

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The Use of Metaphors in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- The Use of Metaphors in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell In the essay ?Shooting an Elephant. by George Orwell, the author uses metaphors to represent his feelings on imperialism, the internal conflict between his personal morals, and his duty to his country. Orwell demonstrates his perspectives and feelings about imperialism.and its effects on his duty to the white man?s reputation. He seemingly blends his opinions and subjects into one, making the style of this essay generally very simple but also keeps it strong enough to merit numerous interpretations....   [tags: Shooting Elephant George Orwell Essays Papers]

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Shooting an Elephant

- In the essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer in Lower Burma, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. Since “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to the British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma, Orwell is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese (12). This allows him to hate his job and the British Empire. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Orwell]

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Shooting an Elephant

- In his essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. He hates his job as a police officer in Moulmein because an “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma. Therefore, Orwell, a white man is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese which allows him to hate his job and British Empire, the root of everything. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13)....   [tags: Analysis, George Orwell]

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Shooting an Elephant

- The art of telling a story relies on the language used. Whether a writer is good at using the language appropriately is vital for an interesting and impressive story. So how can the uses of appropriate language affect the whole narration of a story. George Orwell, one of the most famous English authors, was born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, India, in 1903. His father was a colonial official for the British and his mother’s family also had colonial ties. In 1922, Orwell worked as a British imperial policeman in Burma for five years but he finally returned to England again because he recognized the injustices of the British imperial rule in Burma and could not suffer the guilt of oppressing...   [tags: Literary Analysis, Orwell]

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Shooting An Elephant

- Shooting an Elephant In life we as humans often make decisions that we would not have made on our own if we would not have been influenced by someone else. As humans others' opinions mean a great deal to us, and in "Shooting an Elephant", Orwell shows how true this idea is by the tone of the story. "Shooting an Elephant" is the story of a British policeman in Moulmein, a city in Burma, that is torn between shooting or not shooting an elephant that has gone ramped. The native people did not like him much, but when the elephant went on its rampage they were quick to call on him....   [tags: George Orwell Literature Analysis Shooting Elephan]

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Shooting An Elephant By George Orwell

- After analyzing the evidence shown in “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, it becomes evident that the victims in this essay are the Burmese. The British imperialised Burma and took control of the Burmese, which in result created a bitter Anti-European stigma within Burma. The Burmese were jailed, forced to cram in the ill kept cages of their lock-ups, and beat with bamboos. They were thought to be worthless, as the British claimed that “an elephant was worth more than any damn Coringhee coolie” (5)....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire, Imperialism]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ‘Shooting an Elephant’ is a short story written by George Orwell in 1936. The story is about a young British man who serves as a police officer in Burma, which is part of British India in the 1920s. This policeman is torn between his hate for the British occupation and the abuse he gets from the natives on a daily basis. Politically, he is on the Burmese side because he despises the oppressive British rule in Burma. Even though he is against the occupation, he has to act superior over the natives in order to maintain British power over the land....   [tags: short story, British oppression in Burma]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Since the very first time I could see, my fascination with animals has followed me throughout my life. My childhood goal was to become a Veterinarian and although plans have changed, my passion for animals remains. Pets that I have taken under my wing become my responsibility and my family no matter how small or big they are. This is now the concept that most modern day families have adopted. Some people even consider them their children. Life, however, is not eternal for these little creatures, and like all living beings, their time is numbered....   [tags: animals, pet]

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The Elephant as a Symbol for Imperialism in "Shooting an Elephant”

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell retold an occasion where he was struggling to come to a final decision of whether to shoot the elephant or not. With his final decision, the elephant finally lay dying in front of thousands of people. He said that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he also explained that he had to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” in front of the crowd (14). At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case....   [tags: Symbolism, British, Orwell]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The Lottery '

- A successful descriptive narrative gives the necessary information for a reader to know the material of a text. For instance, narrating the text of a story allows the audience to connect with the feelings of the narrator. A description incorporates visuals so that the audience can recognize the image being portrayed. “Shooting an Elephant” and “The Lottery” are both descriptive narratives. Descriptive narratives give the reader a clearer understanding of the passage. “Shooting an Elephant” is the stronger descriptive narrative because of vivid sensory detail, manipulating the perception of the reader, and Orwell’s use of conflict....   [tags: Narrative, Narrative mode, Narrator, Burma]

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George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”, Orwell priorities the abuse of the Burmese people by the British Empire. Orwell uses the shooting of the elephant to the plight of the Burmese people and their unbroken will in some civil disobedience. The elephant represents a defiance of the British Empire. Also since he was seen as the figured head of the state he had to take action or ruin not only his own standings with the crowd but also with the face of the British Empire. When Orwell starts the essay he tells us how he was hated by the people....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire]

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The Finale of Evil in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell faces a dilemma: whether or not to kill the elephant. With his final decision, the elephant finally lays dead in front of thousands of people. He explains that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he has to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” (14) in front of the crowd. At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case. He effectively uses this incident to demonstrate the “real nature of imperialism” (3), where the elephant represents the British Empire....   [tags: Imperialism, Analytical Essay]

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George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- ... George Orwell illustrates the cold irony and double edged sword of irony. Orwell compares the narrator to the “conventionalized figure of a sahib” and shows that he himself doubts the meaning of his place and the necesity of imperialism. The comparison to the sahib, a term used to name aristocratic Indian rulers or lords, describes how the narrrator sees himself standing infront of these people as mere puppet and hollow conotation of what he is supposed to be. In the end, Orwell caves in to the unrelenting pressure of the natives and the imposing responsibility of upholding the white man’s honor, and he decides to shoot the elephant....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Imperialism]

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Descriptive Narrative Of ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The Lottery '

- A successful descriptive narrative displays the necessary information for a reader to explain or develop speculations within the material. Narrating the text of a story, told through one or more narrators, allows the audience to connect with the feelings of the narrator. A description includes imagery for the audience’s recognition. Furthermore, descriptive narratives have a purpose and are there for a reason. “Shooting an Elephant” and “The Lottery” are both descriptive narratives. Descriptive narratives show a clearer understanding of the passage; therefore, the stronger text is “Shooting an Elephant” because of its detail and the plot’s conflict....   [tags: Narrative, Narrative mode, Narrator, Narratology]

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George Orwell 's Shooting An Elephant

- ... The elephant does not die right away, and even after Orwell has fired multiple rounds into it, the animal continues to suffer in pain. Orwell cannot bare the sight of it, and walks away feeling as though he has just murdered such a gentle creature. At the end of the story, it is revealed that Orwell acted the way he did because he wanted to save face with the Burman people and with the Imperialists. He was acting in accordance to what he believed others would want him to do, and not thinking with his own conscious....   [tags: McCarthyism, Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow]

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Shooting an Elephant

- “Shooting an Elephant” I was not comfortable with many aspects of this story. The prejudice throughout the book was unimaginable, I find I am uncomfortable with any kind of bigotry. Reading of the Burmese people and their disrespect toward someone who was there to “protect and serve”, was difficult. I suppose I am naïve, I try to hold on to the belief that people of God are inherently good. I know there are bad apples in all walks of life, bad people are everywhere so holding on to this optimism is harder each day....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Shooting An Elephant

- The story that my evaluation will be based on is Shooting an Elephant written in 1936. The author George Orwell was born in 1903 in India to a British officer raised in England. He attended Eton College, which introduced him to England’s middle and upper classes. He was denied a scholarship, which led him to become a police officer for the Indian Imperial in 1922. He served in Burma until resigning in 1927 due to the lack of respect for the justice of British Imperialism in Burma and India. He was now determined to become a writer, so at the brink of poverty he began to pay close attention to social outcasts and laborers....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Shooting an Elephant

- A police officer in the British Raj, the supposedly 'unbreakable'; ruling force, was afraid. With his gun aimed at a elephant's head, he was faced with the decision to pull the trigger. That officer was George Orwell, and he writes about his experience in his short story, 'Shooting an Elephant';. To save face, he shrugged it off as his desire to 'avoid looking the fool'; (George Orwell, 283). In truth, the atmosphere of fear and pressure overwhelmed him. His inner struggle over the guilt of being involved in the subjugation of a people added to this strain, and he made a decision he would later regret enough to write this story....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Free Will in Shooting an Elephant and Antigone

- Free Will in Shooting an Elephant and Antigone Free will can be defined as: “The right, given to humans by God, to make their own decisions.” A mans free will cannot be destroyed by any power other than God. Humans can always exercise their free will when making decisions. However, when their decisions come in conflict with the laws set by a higher power, they might face consequences based on how they choose to use their free will. The more restrictions imposed upon someone’s free will the more restricted their ability to make decisions become....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell In his essay Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell explains how the controlling authorities in a hostile country are not controlling the country's population but are in fact a mere tool of the populous. Orwell's experience with the elephant provided the insight for his essay, and gives a clear example of the control the natives have over the authorities. The authorities in Lower Burma were there to police the state that their government controlled, but were only accomplished in being controlled by the people of the state....   [tags: Papers]

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George Orwells Shooting an Elephant

- George Orwells Shooting an Elephant In George Orwell's essay "Shooting An Elephant," he writes about racial prejudice. Orwell is a British officer in Burma. The author is, "for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British"(842). Orwell feels caught in the middle of this cultural struggle. He sympathizes with the oppressed people of India, but is treated poorly, since he is viewed as one of the oppressors. He comes to terms with the role he plays in this vicious cycle of oppression , as an imperial servant, and the influence it has on him to shoot an elephant....   [tags: essays papers]

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Analytical Summary Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ... On his way, he hears that the elephant that was causing trouble was actually a tamed elephant that went mad due to ‘must.’ He also learns that it had already wreaked massive havoc among the Burmese villages. Upon his arrival, he is perplexed at the conflicting testimonies of the natives, making him think that this incident is just a hoax. At that very moment, he sees a corpse of man that the elephant had trampled upon. Realizing the severity of the situation, he sends an orderly to get an elephant rifle and heads towards a paddy field where the elephant rests, followed by a large crowd of people....   [tags: imperialism, wishes, essay, officer]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwells, Writing and Discussion

- Orwell argues in “Shooting an Elephant ” that countries lose power went they become imperialist and totalitarian countries. In “Shooting an Elephant ” he gives the main character beliefs and the will to do the right thing. Despite the main character's sympathy for the people he severs, the people still ridicule him. When the protagonist gets the chance to please the people he does it because he does not want to look weak. He is an instrument of the will of the people he severs, just like totalitarian governments....   [tags: totalitarians, vietnam war, rules]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- ... This is very significant when talking about the struggle of power within the text. Orwell explains how he felt as if he were “an absurd puppet”, which means that the citizens are controlling and manipulating him. He feels that he doesn’t have a lot of control even though he is supposed to be an authoritative figure to the citizens. Orwell uses language and literary devices to convey the power imbalance between the police officer and the locals. He uses language such as, “absurd puppet” to show that the doll has no worth and no power, a puppet is always controlled by the puppeteer, who are Burmese citizens in this text....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire]

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Literary Analysis of “Shooting an Elephant,” by George Orwell

- ... Part five is the last paragraph, he tells us about why that he had to kill the elephant. At the beginning, Orwell claims that he is fully against the Imperialism and he describes it as “devil”. O well’s point is to use the image of the elephant as a metaphor to demonstrate the destructive and unethical power of the Imperialism. We can see the destruction of imperialism when Orwell depicts “An elephant was ravaging the bazaar” ()and “It had already destroyed somebody’s bamboo huts, kill a cow and raided some fruit-stalls and devoured the stock;” ()....   [tags: metaphor, imperialism, imagery]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- …When The White Man Turns Tyrant It Is His Own Freedom That He Destroys: A Critical Analysis Of George Orwell’s “Shooting An Elephant” Killing an enemy chips away at your humanity. It is human nature to long for acceptance within one’s community. Often, one is forced to sacrifice bits of their morals to achieve this acceptance. In “Shooting an Elephant” Orwell illustrates this concept by recalling an incident that occurred during his time as a British police officer in Moulmein, Burma. The task he was set to accomplish while here was the dispatching of a renegade elephant....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire]

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An Exploration of British Injustice in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ... This phrase shows not only how the people oppressed by the Imperialism suffer, but the tyrant itself by giving up his freedom. Through the way Orwell arrange this paragraph the audience can now truly understand Orwell’s argument about how Imperialism has negative effects on those in the power, and how ironically it is for Orwell to gain power and dominance over others, just to lose freedom and dominance over yourself. Through the essay, with the use of particular emotional words and sentences, the audience can perceive Orwell’s feelings and emotions, by the memorable amount of pathos over his essay....   [tags: imperialism, control, pressure]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Inducting Imperialism Introduction Burma was imperialized during a time of political unrest over the wealth of the country through rich, natural resources. George Orwell, an experienced British officer and renowned novelist, uses his experience as an officer there to illustrate his claim that “imperialism is an evil thing” in his short story, “Shooting an Elephant.” (181) Imperialism is an extension of power that is common to industrialized nations because it allows powerful countries to go into troubled communities and help them advance, while at the same time gain access to their valuable resources....   [tags: British Empire, Imperialism, Burma, Colonialism]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, the narrator is the main character of the story trapped in his own environment between righteousness and authority. He is unsure of his path on whether to defend the people of Burma from the oppression of the British ruling in which he serves that can lead him to losing his job as sub-divisional town of Burma, India. Orwell personally relates to the narrator that is reflected in his writing allowing the reader to get a glimpse of his political views. In the short story Orwell like the narrator was an Anglo-Indian official, a term used to describe all British people of mixed Indian and British descent....   [tags: British Empire, United Kingdom, British Raj]

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British Imperialism Exposed in Shooting an Elephant, by George Orwell

- George Orwell was, without a doubt, one of the most influential authors of his time. His strong opposition to totalitarianism and imperialism made him one of the most recognizable names in literature during the 1900’s. Orwell spent 5 years as an imperial policeman in Burma, witnessing firsthand the effects of imperialism on the people of Burma (BBC). The insight he gained during those years made clear to him the injustices of colonization and fueled his opposition to totalitarianism....   [tags: British Imperialism Essays]

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George Orwell's Shooting and Elephant and William Carlos Williams's The Use of Force

- George Orwell’s short story “Shooting and elephant” and William Carlos Williams “The use of force” both share the same theme which is violence. While these stories are very much different they share many similarities. They both commit an act of violence and those acts have different effects on the main characters of the stories. “The use of force” by William Carlos Williams is about a doctor who makes a home visit and wants to diagnose this child because he thinks she has Diphtheria. The doctor must examine her throat but it is not an easy task because it becomes a conflict between the doctor and the child....   [tags: theme of violence analysis]

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Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell, Brief Description of Words and Symbols

- 1. From the beginning of this essay Orwell’s purpose was never to shoot the elephant. In paragraph 3, lines eight through nine he explains not wanting to shoot it and speaks about bringing the gun to give the elephant a good fright. Leaving the gun at home or bringing the gun would have made no difference to what happened at the end. The gun was of little use, the main gun was not even his own but the riffle. 2. Orwell shot the elephant not to save the people in the village but for his own benefits....   [tags: irony, epiphany, coolie]

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Brutal Honesty Hits The Unsuspecting Mark. Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- ... When Orwell arrives on the scene to enforce order and sees the elephant, the beast is docile and eating grass in a field with the “preoccupied grandmotherly air that elephants have,” (Orwell, 1946, para.8). All at once, Orwell decides not to shoot the elephant but to watch him to see if he has calmed down and is of no further threat; even though he has already sent for an elephant rifle. Suddenly it dawns on him that a huge crowd of Burmese peasants have gathered to watch him shoot the elephant....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, British Empire]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' Civil Disobedience ' By Harlan Ellison And ' Shooting An Elephant '

- The world roughly hold about seven billion people. People from different backgrounds, nationality, race, but there is a high percentage of people in this world that struggle to make moral decisions on their own because they are scared of becoming an outcast, an enemy. In addition, this cycle causes people to be controlled by the society and not make decisions that would possibly better them but rather turn them into the society’s robot. In essays such as, “‘Repent Harlequin’ Said the Ticktock Man” and “Shooting an Elephant,” written by Harlan Ellison and George Orwell, respectively, each character faces a conflict with themselves by not using their own moral sense and getting faced with chal...   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, Civil disobedience]

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Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The War Prayer '

- Imperialism, is it the big, bad master who enslaves the good, little child or is it the good, big master who protects the bad, little child. As history has shown in the past; sometimes, it is both. Through examination of three important pieces of literature “Shooting an Elephant by G. Orwell, White Man’s Burden by R. Kipling, and The War Prayer by M. Twain, it becomes obvious that there are serious consequences in supporting imperialistic ideals. Three very important ideas about Imperialism can be gleaned from these writings, which then provide a distinct concept about the subject....   [tags: British Empire, Colonialism, Imperialism, Empire]

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Colonialism and Imperialism Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness

- Destructive Colonization Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness       As a man is captured, his first instinct is to try and break free from his shackles and chains. Primal urges such as this often accompany humans when they are forced, as in capture, to rely on their most basic instincts to survive. In this manner, natives in Africa acted upon instinct when the Europeans arrived to take their land and freedom. The short story Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell and the novel Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad revolve around the time when colonialism had a foothold in many parts of the world....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Critical Response- George Orwells Shooting And Elephant

- Critical Response Essay I class, we read a short story by George Orwell called Shooting an Elephant. It was a story about courage, judgment, and the pressure of peers. I personally did not like this story. I found it boring, pointless, and just another "hasn’t -this -happened -to -you" story about nothing. However, it was very well written, and if I had to critically respond to this story, I would praise the author on a number of things. The story opens by describing the relationship between the town and himself, a sort of sub-division police officer of the town....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Effects of Groupthink

- Everyday a war is being waged, not in foreign countries- but in small neighborhoods and capital cities all over the world. A timeless battle to retain individual thought and action in an increasingly conformist society. The concept of a unanimous group-thinking society can be witnessed throughout history in the form of political controversies to pop culture and trends, to subtle influences in everyday life. The short narrative “Shooting an Elephant” written by George Orwell is a perfect example of group-thinking that implicates that to be accepted into these societal groups, one must do what is right by them, and not by the individual....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell]

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Analysis Of The Article ' Moral Instinct ' By Steven Pinker

- ... The first conflict arises, which is his social conflict between the Burmans and himself and the tension begins to grow. Orwell is not accepted by society since he is British, and this illustrates the background conflict to the audience. The foreground conflict is when “… an elephant was ravaging the bazaar. [Orwell is asked to]… please come and do something about it.” (87). It may seem like an odd job, but this is where Orwell’s actions prove him either as a hero or an abuser of power. The reason Orwell responds to the call is that he has that sense of the five spheres that Pinker discusses, and the one he is concerned about is “fairness” (78)....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

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Courga in Colin McDougall´s The Firing Squad and George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant

- A characters courage is not measured by how an action will be accepted by others, but by how their actions stay true to themselves even in the face of a pressured surrounding. Colin McDougall’s The Firing Squad a story about a young soldiers attempt at redemption and George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant an essay about Orwell’s days in a British colony where he was called to handle the situation with an aggressive elephant are two pieces of literature that demonstrate the effects of courage. Courage takes many forms and in these two great pieces of literature it can be measured by looking at the characters and how they use courage and lack of courage as a driving factor in different ways thro...   [tags: Soldiers, War, Fear]

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Is Peer Pressure Good Or Bad?

- ... In Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell, he critiques society on peer pressure, our own mental thoughts, and being in control. One of the obvious critiques of the story is that of peer pressure. He suggests that this has become a very common thing of human nature now. All the time people are being pressured into doing things, whether they know it or not. In the story the narrator says, “And if that happened it was quite probable that some of them would laugh. That would never do. There was only one alternative.” (Page 1325, Lines 2-4) It is clear that right here the only thing that got him to shoot the elephant was the pressure of the people around him....   [tags: George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, Burma, Musth]

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The Depictions of Imperialism in Shooting an Elephany by George Orwell

- ... When a man is killed by the outraged elephant and the Burmese people follow the police officer on his way to the elephant he realizes that the Burmese expect him to shoot the elephant. He knows it would not be right to kill the animal because of its worth and because it has started to calm down and would be the tame, harmless animal it is used to be. But under the pressure of the crowd the police man does not see leaving the elephant alive as an option because it would make him look weak and he might get laughed at if he gets attacked by the animal....   [tags: police, autobiography, experience]

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Elephant by Gus Van Sant

- In today’s society many different forms of art constantly surround us. The music blaring through your headphones, the advertisements we come across, and even the buildings peering high above the New York skyline can all be considered art. One of the most popular mediums of art in the present time is filmmaking. Film uses moving photographs to narrate a story, express emotions and convey ideas. The unique aspect of the art of film is that it allows the viewer to become its subject or characters and experience their situations as they are occurring....   [tags: film analysis]

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An Analysis of Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant"

- "Shooting an Elephant" is one of the most popular of George Orwell's essays. Like his essays "A hanging" and "How the Poor Die", it is chiefly autobiographical. It deals with his experience as a police-officer in Burma. After having completed his education, Orwell joined the Indian Imperial Police, and served in Burma, from 1922 to 1927, as an Assistant Superintendent of Police. His experiences as an officer in Burma were bitter. He was often a victim of the hostility and injustices at the hands of his colleagues and officers....   [tags: European Literature]

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Analysis of Elephant, by Gus Van Sant

- In today’s society many different forms of art constantly surround us. The music blaring through your headphones, the advertisements we come across, and even the buildings peering high above the New York skyline can all be considered art. One of the most popular mediums of art in present time is filmmaking. Film uses moving photographs to narrate a story, express emotions and convey ideas. The unique aspect of the art of film is that it allows the viewer to become its subject or characters and experience their situations as they are occurring....   [tags: Film Analysis]

Term Papers
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The Effects Of Hunting Bison On The Wildlife Fund

- ... The tigers’ skin is typically used as fancy rugs. While the claws and teeth of the animal are used in traditional Asian medicine. Tiger parts are regarded highly in Asian medicine; however, there is no medical value to any part of a tiger. Rhinos are highly endangered due to poaching. A type of rhinos, called Javan rhinos, is known as the closest mammal to extinction with less than 100 of these beasts still roaming Africa. Rhinos are killed mainly for their horns while the rest of their bodies are left to rot in the wilds....   [tags: Tiger, Elephant, Endangered species, Hunting]

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An Elephant Crackup By Charles Siebert Drills On The Downfall Of Elephants

- ... Sound familiar. We too bury our passed loved ones and have events to say goodbye to them. We used voice, tone and gesture to communicate with each other, they “employ a range of vocalizations, from low-frequency rumbles to higher-pitched screams and trumpets, along with a variety of visual signals”(Siebert 355-356). So now,with all these resemblances, the connection between humanity and elephants is too apparent to just be a coincidence. This is the time where a question is raised: If we are so similar, could the things that are happening to the elephants also be happening right now or in a near future to humans....   [tags: Elephant, Asian Elephant, War elephant, Al-Fil]

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African Elephants and Human-Elephant Interactions: Implications for Conservations by P.C. Lee and M.D. Graham

- The Elephant is something to marvel at there is no animal quite like them. Between its shear size (the largest terrestrial mammal alive today), the familiar emotions they share with humans such as mourning for their dead, or their unique features like their large trunks, tusks, and ears, there is nothing that compares. These are some reasons why this large beautiful animal should not be taken for granted in today’s society. Unfortunately they have been between the illegal poaching for ivory, human elephant conflict regarding land usage, and environmental factors; they have become endangered....   [tags: the ivory trade, elephant population]

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Sandy Hook Shooting

- Nothing is more horrible then the atrocities that took place on December 14th 2012 in Sandy Hook Connecticut, when students at the Sandy Hook Elementary school were gunned down by twenty years old Adam Lanza. who suffered from an obsessive compulsive behavior, and had an odd fascination with mass shootings, when he entered the school carrying more than thirty pounds of ammunition and Lanza had three guns, one was a semi-automatic bushmaster rifle, and two pistols, Lanza then killed twenty first- grader students, and six adults, his mother being one of them, all in eleven minuets....   [tags: biased news, shooting, elementary]

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Nisour Square Shooting

- Nisour Square Shooting For years Blackwater have been operating above the law, but Nisour Square Shooting was the last straw. On Sept. 16, 2007 a Blackwater convoy opened fired on a crowd of unarmed citizens killing 14 and wounding 18. “In Baghdad, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki promised that Blackwater guards would be held accountable for what he called "a big crime" in the weekend violence. Iraqi officials have threatened to expel Blackwater from Iraq over the incident, in which at least nine Iraqis were killed.” (Fainaru, 2007) Operating directly for the State Department made Blackwater next to untouchable....   [tags: iraqui shooting, blackwater, leadership]

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The Elephant Man

- The Elephant Man John Merrick, a man so pathetic and helpless because of the curse of his extremely disfigured body he carries around with him. Lots of people are born with some deformity or another, but none such as the case of John Merrick, in other words, ‘The Elephant Man’ who was given this name because he was so deformed he resembled an extremely ugly elephant. The movie shows how John Merrick is marginalized not only by the general public, but also the poorest of people to such an extent that his life was a misery....   [tags: Elephant Man Essays]

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Dylan Klebold's Motives in the Columbine High School Shooting

- “People are so unaware...well, Ignorance is bliss I guess… that would explain my depression.” (Klebold, Dylan). With that sentence, I divulged myself into the most horrendous, sad journal I have ever read, hoping to gain some insight into a disturbed young man’s mind. On April 20th, 1999, Dylan Klebold accompanied his friend, Eric Harris, in one of the most publicized and shocking school shootings of the modern day--The Columbine Massacre. With their sawed-off shotguns and godlike dispositions, the boys exacted their revenge not only on their peers, but on themselves....   [tags: Mass Shooting, Gun Crime, School Shooting]

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Bernard Pomerance and the Elephant Man

- Bernard Pomerance and the Elephant Man Bernard Pomerance was born in 1940 in Brooklyn, New York. He attended college at the University of Chicago, where he received a degree in English. In the 1970's Pomerance moved to London, England to become a novelist. He was unsuccessful and then decided to try his hand as a dramatist. He quickly got involved with several left-wing fringe groups, which where at the time thriving in England. Then, along with director Ronald Rees, he founded the Foco Nove Theater group....   [tags: Elephant Man Essays]

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Elephants And Its Effects On The World

- ... Ten months of cancer claiming his body made him so small, skin and bone. When elephants grieve, they stroke the bones and lay leaves over the body to cover it. The day that I found out my grandfather had hairy cell leukemia, a rare strand of the already rare strand of chronic lymphotic leukemia, my best friend sat 205 miles away and gave me the best advice possible over Skype. She asked: “How do you get rid of an elephant in a room?” I thought of the massive size of an elephant, imagining one squeezing like a balloon into my nine-foot-tall living room....   [tags: Elephant, Asian Elephant, Elephants, Fozzie Bear]

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The Extinction Of Asian Elephants

- ... First, it is important to emphasize having national parks and reserve areas for these elephants so they can feel protected and be safe from dying or being killed. They have to have a large amount of crops and vegetation in order for them to feel comfortable and be able to be healthy. Another important way to save its habitat is the importance of ecotourism. Tourism generates much revenue, which is efficient because it can continue to help the elephants. The national parks are a good source of tourism that indeed helps generate that revenue that will then help the wildlife....   [tags: Elephant, Asian Elephant, Elephas, Elephantidae]

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The Guy Behind the Gun: Elementary School Shooting Case

- On December 17, 2012, a man shot twenty-seven people—twenty of which were children—at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. Had there been a gun for the school’s defense, the amount of those killed could have been significantly lower. As Adam Lanza entered the building, armed and ready to kill, a good guy could have shot him, saving many lives. Guns control prohibits good people from having the ability to stop the bad guys. Gun control laws should be loosened because they violate the Constitution, decrease protection, and it is proven that gun control laws only result in higher crime rate....   [tags: gun control, mass shooting, adam lanza]

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Another Day, Another Mass Shooting in America

- As shootings begin to happen more frequently, Congress feels like throwing up more laws is going to fix it; when in reality that will not help. It is human nature for the majority of people in the world to want to break rules, or in this case laws, solely just because they are there to break. Therefore, Congress should not create more gun control for it is unconstitutional. In the event that Congress makes more laws, they should expect more crime than without them. Does taking guns away solve the problem; well not exactly....   [tags: mass shouting, shouter, control]

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Virginia Tech Shooting

- How safe do you feel when you attend school everyday. Many students and faculty don’t really think too much about school being a dangerous place; however, after a couple of school shootings had taken place their minds and thoughts may have changed completely. On April 16, 2007, in the town of Blacksburg Virginia, a college student who attended Virginia Tech, opened gunfire to his fellow classmates. This shooting has been considered to be the biggest massacre in all of American history. There are many things to be discussed in this major tragedy....   [tags: School Shooting Violence Gun]

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1641 words | (4.7 pages) | Preview

The Woman With No Name in Monte Hellman's The Shooting

- The Woman With No Name in Monte Hellman's The Shooting Works Cited Missing Generally forgotten by critics, and classified as alternately a cult classic and a B-movie (in reference to both its budget and its reception), Monte Hellman's The Shooting is a film worth revisiting. At a remote camp in the middle of the desert, a Woman With No Name arrives to hire two men to lead her to the town of Kingsley, days after one of the camp members was shot dead and another ran away. On their descent into the scorching desert, it becomes apparent that the Woman has misled her employees as a hired gun joins their party and they continue their journey, it would seem, to execute somebody....   [tags: Film Movie Shooting Hellman Essays]

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The Red Lake Massacre

- ... Days prior to the shooting, Jeffrey watched the film Elephant, which was about a school shooting (Langman 2005). Weise’s victims included Daryl Lussier, Michelle Signa, 5 students—Thurlene Stillday, 15; Chase Lussier, 15, Chanelle Rosebear, 15, Alicia Spike, 14, Dwayne Lewis, 15, school security guard—Derrick Brun and school teacher Neva Rogers, 62 (CNN 2005) . Each victim was targeted at random according to different news media coverage. Students that were killed were located in a study hall room that was targeted at a random decision (Maag 2005)....   [tags: school shootings]

Term Papers
1501 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

Hills like White Elephants by Ernest Hemingway

- Symbolism in Hemingway’s Story ‘Hills like White Elephants’ ‘Hills Like White Elephants’ is a short story authored by Ernest Hemingway about an American and a girl named Jig. In the story, the two are sitting in a train station waiting for the train to Madrid. While they wait, they have an intense ongoing debate on whether or not to abort Jig. At the end of the story, the train is about to arrive and the man carries luggage on the tracks as they prepare to leave. The end of the story does not clearly define the outcome of its decision....   [tags: symbolism, white elephant]

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1361 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

Elephant the movie

- Gus Van Sant’s Elephant was at once critically praised and denounced by both film reviewers and filmgoers alike. The cinematography takes you on a waltz throughout a seemingly typical day at an unnamed high school, stopping through the journey to focus on the stereotypes of school. The jock, the quirky artist, the cliqued girls, the skateboarder, they are all represented and representative of his film. Van Sant created a film, seemingly without a staunch opinion on the horrors of the Columbine shootings....   [tags: essays research papers]

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1524 words | (4.4 pages) | Preview

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