Your search returned over 400 essays for "Shooting an Elephant"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

Shooting an Elephant by Geroge Orwell

- In his early twenties, George Orwell (1946) began a line of work he would later term “an unsuitable profession”: officer of the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, which began his transformation into a writer of primarily political topics. His essay “Shooting an Elephant” describes his feelings of frustration in attempting to perform his duty – shooting a mad elephant discovered to have broken its chain, destroyed property, and killed a man – while avoiding the ridicule of the local population. (Orwell, 1936) The elephant can be seen to represent a number of individuals and groups in the story, held by various chains in their different circumstances....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant Essays]

Strong Essays
947 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

Shooting An Elephant By George Orwell

- “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell “Shooting an Elephant” By George Orwell reveals the story of events during Orwell’s service as a sub-divisional police officer with the India Imperial Police, in Moulmein, Burma. “Shooting an Elephant” By George Orwell reflects Orwell’s emotions of hatred, bitterness, and guilt felt due to oppression of Imperialism. The story begins with Orwell explaining his deep hatred for the role he took place in during his service as a police officer in Burma. He was not happy within his daily routine and began to feel intense hatred towards the empire, he served, the Burma people (yellow faces) and with his deep smoldering emotions within himself....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
872 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

True Power in "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell

- The quest for power is one which has been etched into the minds of men throughout history. However, it can be said that true power is not a result of one’s actions but comes from the following one’s own beliefs without being influenced by others. This principle sets up the story for Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell. The protagonist, Orwell himself, is a sub divisional police officer in Burma, a British colony. Orwell must try to find and use his inner power when he is faced with the decision of whether or not to kill an elephant which has ravaged the Burman’s homes....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant]

Powerful Essays
1473 words | (4.2 pages) | Preview

Shooting An Elephant By George Orwell

- Shooting an Elephant In George Orwell’s story, “Shooting an Elephant,” he goes through numerous emotions. It is a very thought provoking work that takes the reader inside his mind. He goes through many emotions throughout the text, he experienced humiliation, evil, and confliction. In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell experiences humiliation. “When a nimble Burman tripped me up on the football field and the referee looked the other way, the crowd yelled with hideous laughter” (p.323) His profession of being a police officer made him an enemy and a target to most people in town....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant, Musth]

Better Essays
854 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Symbolism and Imperialism in “Shooting an Elephant” George Orwell dramatically writes about his time in Burma as an Imperial Officer in his essay “Shooting an Elephant”. He communicates in detail how he disagrees with the concept of imperialism but likewise dislikes the taunting Burmese community. Orwell goes on to recount the time an elephant rampages the village and how enlightening of an experience it was. Symbolism is a heavy orchestrator in this essay, with Orwell relating the concept of imperialism to several events such as the elephant’s rampage, the dead coolie, and the actual shooting of the elephant....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
800 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

George Orwell 's Shooting An Elephant

- “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell “Shooting an Elephant” By George Orwell reflects Orwell’s emotions of hatred, bitterness, and guilt felt due to oppression of Imperialism in Moulmein, Burma; During Orwell’s service as a sub-divisional police officer with the India Imperial Police. The story begins with Orwell explaining his deep hatred for the role he took place in during his service as a police officer in Burma. He was not happy within his daily routine and began to feel intense hatred towards the empire he served, the Burma people (yellow faces) and with his deep smoldering emotions within himself....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
784 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

The Effect of Respect on Morality Depicted in The Guest and Shooting an Elephant

- The prevailing theme in The Guest and Shooting an Elephant is the effect of respect on morality. In the former, the main character Daru exhibits a great deal of respect and hospitality to the Arab, especially considering the circumstances. In the latter, the Burmans exhibit no respect to the police officer in the event of the elephant display, or in his day to day life. These opposite scenarios have a distinct effect on the morality of the main characters. Respect has a distinct effect on morality which differs depending on if respect is being strived for or shown....   [tags: The Guest and Shooting an Elephant]

Good Essays
508 words | (1.5 pages) | Preview

Pride and Power in George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" and "A Hanging"

- Every writer has that one special quirk that keeps readers coming back for more. Whether it is the humor or the characters, most authors carry their quirks from story to story. In “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell describes his experience of shooting an elephant. In “A Hanging,” he describes the emotions that run through him as he watches the hanging of a prisoner. Both essays have similar key ideas that identify Orwell as a writer. The results of pride and power contribute to the themes that connect his essays and identify Orwell as a descriptive writer....   [tags: shooting an elephant, a hanging]

Strong Essays
986 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant and The Man Who Would Be King

- Moral Authority and the Ultimate Fate of Imperialism The 1800’s staged the universal dissemination and climax of British imperialism, thereby destructing and reconstructing the world into a new order. It is ordinary to depict the British as overindulgent consumerists, and the natives as magnanimous servers of the Empire, though history suggests that imperialism was not a mere black and white affair. It is certain that imperialism unjustly exhausted global resources and is therefore deserving of its condemnation....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant Essays]

Research Papers
2534 words | (7.2 pages) | Preview

George Orwell 's Shooting An Elephant

- George Orwell was born in India and was educated in England. Later he joined the Imperial Police in Burma were he traveled to countries. All throw out his life he wrote about difficult situations that had ordinary incites. In 1984 he died but his lifelong commitment was as relevant as ever. In the story “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell there are 3 messages that in some way or another has to deal with peer pressure. Orwell was a cop in another land where the people there didn’t really like him much because he was there to keep order because his country just took it over....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant, Want]

Better Essays
708 words | (2 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Symbolism in "Shooting an Elephant" George Orwell dramatically writes about his time in Burma as an Imperial Officer in his essay "Shooting an Elephant". He communicates in detail how he disagrees with the concept of imperialism but likewise dislikes the taunting Burmese community. Orwell goes on to recount the time an elephant rampages the village and how enlightening of an experience it was. Symbolism is a heavy orchestrator in this essay, with Orwell relating the concept of imperialism to several events such as the elephant 's rampage, the dead coolie, and the actual shooting of the elephant....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
749 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

Comparing George Orwell 's ' Stranger ' And ' Shooting An Elephant '

- James Baldwin and George Orwell Comparison The essay “Stranger in the village” by James Baldwin, and “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, share a similarity in their experience in a new environments. Orwell a British officer he was not warmly welcome, the Burmese people hated. As for Baldwin it is more of racism than hated. Both essays happen in unfamiliar places where there were racism and discrimination. They do not fit in with the natives and is judged because of their nationalities. However, the themes of these writing differ....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
1121 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In the essay, "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell, the narrative includes almost no dialogue. Orwell 's voice as narrator is the only one readers hear. Orwell appears to have needed to empathize the inner conflict experienced by the narrator, who does not really want to shoot the elephant but feels compelled to do so to "avoid looking a fool." Ultimately, the requests and rationale of the government constrain individuals to act against their own ethical compasses. The absence of a dialogue is to emphasize the internal conflict experienced by the narrator....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
760 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- The essay “Shooting an Elephant,” was written by George Orwell. Orwell was a British author best known for his essays and novels. In “Shooting an Elephant,” the title essay of his 1950 collection, Orwell is a British Police Officer in Lower Burma. After an elephant comes rampaging through the village in must, killing an Indian man, Orwell is looked upon to take care of the problem. The intense scene causes Orwell to make a crucial decision, reflecting on the vicious imperialism with the military in Burma during this time....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
801 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- George Orwell, other wise known as Eric Arthur Blair, is a well known British author. He spent a total of five years as an officer to the India Imperial police. This experience led him to resign and later become an author. In Orwell 's Shooting an Elephant, he describes this experience with the use of multiple symbolic characters. He uses items such as the gun used to shoot the elephant, the town’s people that watch him, and even the elephant itself to hold a specific symbolic meaning. One of the many symbolic elements in this piece is the gun....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
840 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- George Orwell is a novel writer, born in India and have only spent five days there. Ida Mabel Limouzin, his mother, brought him and his sister too England while his father stayed in India. The novel Shooting an Elephant, that George wrote, took place in the bottom of Burma in the middle of Moulmein. The story is about George Orwell hesitating to kill an Elephant that has killed a man. All George planned to do was to test the elephant to see if it really meant any harm. George feels pressured by the crowd following him because they expect him to kill the elephant....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
763 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" In 'Shooting an Elephant,' George Orwell finds himself in a difficult situation involving an elephant. The fate of the elephant lies in his hands. Only he can make the final decision. In the end, due to Orwell's decision, the elephant lay dying in a pool of blood. Orwell wins the sympathy of readers by expressing the pressure he feels as an Anglo-Indian in Burma, struggling with his morals, and showing a sense of compassion for the dying animal. Readers sympathize with Orwell because they can relate to his emotions in the moments before the shooting....   [tags: George Orwell Shooting Elephant]

Better Essays
792 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” from The Seagull Reader: Essays, George Orwell explains about his time as a police officer in Moulmein, Lower Burma when an elephant turned loose in the village. He knew that from the start he “had no intention of shooting the elephant” (246), but as he starts his search for the elephant, the Burmans tell him that the elephant trampled a person to death. As Orwell continues his quest to find the elephant, a crowd joins his side. Soon, he finds the elephant doing no harm but knows he must shoot the elephant because the Burmans would think of him as a fool if he didn’t....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, Musth]

Better Essays
750 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Being responsible is being accountable for your actions. If you are guilty of a certain situation, you are still responsible for your misdeed you caused. Confessing to your actions is a strong thing to do, but in the end you still did the crime and should still face the same consequences even if you didn’t confess. Orwell didn’t want to shoot the elephant, but he was scared how the townspeople would treat him if he didn 't shoot it. After he shot the elephant, he felt extremely guilty and took responsibility to confess his misdeed....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, Musth]

Better Essays
991 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- “Shooting an Elephant,” by George Orwell, is an interesting story at most. It incorporates politics, culture, reality and more while Orwell reflects on an experience in his past. This experience, a true experience, takes place in British Burma, while he was a part of the Imperial Police. Orwell, as the narrator, tells how he personally experienced the imperialism in Burma, and to coming upon an elephant ravaging a bazaar. Upon reading “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell uses three literary devices: tone, irony, and imagery....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, Irony]

Better Essays
1093 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Every day, each individual will look back on decisions he or she have made and mature from those experiences. Though it takes time to realize these choices, the morals and knowledge obtained from them are priceless. In George Orwell’s nonfictional essay, “Shooting an Elephant”, a young Orwell was stationed in Burma for the British imperial forces, tasked to deal with an elephant who destroyed various parts of the village Moulmein while its owner was away. Backed by second thoughts and a crowd of thousands, he finds himself shooting the elephant and reflecting that it was not justified; however, it was a choice pushed by his duty and the people....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Shooting an Elephant, Musth]

Better Essays
781 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell gives his opinion on imperialism when he says, “I was hated by large numbers of people—the only time in my life that I was I have been important enough for this to happen to me. I was sub-divisional police officer of the town, and in an aimless, petty kind of way anti-European feeling was very bitter” (1). The main sentences in his first paragraph indicate the terrible way of imperialism and its bit-by-bit destructive consequences for both sides of the condition....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, KILL, Shooting an Elephant]

Better Essays
721 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

Society's Influence on People Depicted in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant and Lucy Grealy's Mirrors

- Throughout the ages, people have at times been influenced by society to do things they would not normally do. There are people who have been influenced to do things they did not desire to do at the behest of others, simply to be accepted by their peers. The choices that are made in life affect you either way even if they were made by you or someone else. Each choice made has a consequence which will affect the individual and in return the decision will produce a particular outcome. Influence is a hard thing to calculate into someone’s life and seeing how it changes lives for better or for worst is very difficult....   [tags: shooting an elephant, mirrors]

Strong Essays
972 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell Few supervisors experience lack of respect and denunciation from workers because of their positions in a company. Supervisors take actions to preserve the image of authority before subordinates and from being ridiculed by their workers, even if the supervisors object these types of actions. The essay "Shooting an Elephant" relates to this situation. The author of this essay is George Orwell. The author talks about his work and personal experience that emphasizes the impact of imperialism at the sociological and psychological stage....   [tags: Orwell Elephant Shooting Analysis]

Powerful Essays
1529 words | (4.4 pages) | Preview

Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell George Orwell's essay 'Shooting an Elephant' gives remarkable insight into the human psyche. The essay presents a powerful theme of inner conflict. Orwell feels strong inner conflict between what he believes as a human being, and what he believes and should do as an imperial police officer. The author is amazingly effective in illustrating this conflict by providing specific examples of contradictory feelings, by providing an anecdote that exemplified his feelings about his situation, and by using vivid imagery to describe his circumstances....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant George Orwell Essays]

Better Essays
894 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism

- George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant as an Attack on Colonialism and Imperialism   The glorious days of the imperial giants have passed, marking the death of the infamous and grandiose era of imperialism. George Orwell's essay, Shooting an Elephant, deals with the evils of imperialism. The unjust shooting of an elephant in Orwell's story is the central focus from which Orwell builds his argument through the two dominant characters, the elephant and its executioner. The British officer, the executioner, acts as a symbol of the imperial country, while the elephant symbolizes the victim of imperialism....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays Orwell ]

Better Essays
837 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

Moral Issues and Decisions in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- Moral Issues and Decisions in Shooting an Elephant    Throughout "Shooting an Elephant" by George Orwell, he addresses his  internal battle with the issues of morality and immorality. He writes of several situations that show his immoral doings. When George Orwell signed up for a five-year position as a British officer in Burma he was unaware of the moral struggle that he was going to face. Likewise, he has an internal clash between his moral conscious and his immoral actions. Therefore, Orwell becomes a puppet to the will of the Burmese by abandoning his thoughts of moral righteousness....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]

Better Essays
611 words | (1.7 pages) | Preview

George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant - A Moral Dilemma

- A Moral Dilemma in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant Unanticipated choices one is forced to make can have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author recounts an event from his life when he was about twenty years old during which he had to choose the lesser of two evils. Many years later, the episode seems to still haunt him. The story takes place at some time during the five unhappy years Orwell spends as a British police officer in Burma. He detests his situation in life, and when he is faced with a moral dilemma, a valuable work animal has to die to save his pride....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]

Strong Essays
990 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

Power of the Oppressed in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- Power of the Oppressed Exposed in Shooting an Elephant     In Burma, the Indian Imperial Police consisted of British officers who, in theory, supported the extension of power and dominion of a nation, which is the basis of imperialism. George Orwell decided to follow family tradition when he went to Burma to work for the Indian Imperial Police, yet "when he realized how much against their will the Burmese were ruled by the British, he felt increasingly ashamed of his role as an alien police officer" (Britannica)....   [tags: Shooting Elephant Essays]

Powerful Essays
1977 words | (5.6 pages) | Preview

Media Manipulation Exposed in George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- Media Manipulation Exposed in George Orwell's “Shooting an Elephant” The phrase “the power of the press” is used often, but what exactly is the power of the press. Since the beginning of news reporting, it’s been known that what actually gets into the news reports is monitored and carefully picked by higher authorities. What isn’t widely known, however, is that the media can use specific wording and phrases that, on the surface, look like normal news coverage, but are actually a technique of the media to control the images people see and the words they hear and read....   [tags: George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant]

Powerful Essays
1588 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

Critical Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Critical Analysis of Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell "Shooting an Elephant" is perhaps one of the most anthologized essays in the English language. It is a splendid essay and a terrific model for a theme of narration. The point of the story happens very much in our normal life, in fact everyday. People do crazy and sometimes illegal moves to get a certain group or person to finally give them respect. George Orwell describes an internal conflict between his personal morals and his duty to his country to the white man's reputation....   [tags: Shooting an Elephant George Orwell Essays]

Better Essays
848 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

The Use of Metaphors in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- The Use of Metaphors in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell In the essay ?Shooting an Elephant. by George Orwell, the author uses metaphors to represent his feelings on imperialism, the internal conflict between his personal morals, and his duty to his country. Orwell demonstrates his perspectives and feelings about imperialism.and its effects on his duty to the white man?s reputation. He seemingly blends his opinions and subjects into one, making the style of this essay generally very simple but also keeps it strong enough to merit numerous interpretations....   [tags: Shooting Elephant George Orwell Essays Papers]

Better Essays
878 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant

- In the essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer in Lower Burma, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. Since “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to the British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma, Orwell is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese (12). This allows him to hate his job and the British Empire. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Orwell]

Good Essays
1354 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant

- In his essay, Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell illustrates his experiences as a British police officer, and reflects it to the nature of imperialism. He hates his job as a police officer in Moulmein because an “anti-European feeling was very bitter” due to British Empire’s dictatorship in Burma. Therefore, Orwell, a white man is being treated disrespectfully by the Burmese which allows him to hate his job and British Empire, the root of everything. However, the incident of shooting of an elephant gives him a “better glimpse … of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic government act” (13)....   [tags: Analysis, George Orwell]

Good Essays
1357 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant

- The art of telling a story relies on the language used. Whether a writer is good at using the language appropriately is vital for an interesting and impressive story. So how can the uses of appropriate language affect the whole narration of a story. George Orwell, one of the most famous English authors, was born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, India, in 1903. His father was a colonial official for the British and his mother’s family also had colonial ties. In 1922, Orwell worked as a British imperial policeman in Burma for five years but he finally returned to England again because he recognized the injustices of the British imperial rule in Burma and could not suffer the guilt of oppressing...   [tags: Literary Analysis, Orwell]

Better Essays
1589 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

Shooting An Elephant

- Shooting an Elephant In life we as humans often make decisions that we would not have made on our own if we would not have been influenced by someone else. As humans others' opinions mean a great deal to us, and in "Shooting an Elephant", Orwell shows how true this idea is by the tone of the story. "Shooting an Elephant" is the story of a British policeman in Moulmein, a city in Burma, that is torn between shooting or not shooting an elephant that has gone ramped. The native people did not like him much, but when the elephant went on its rampage they were quick to call on him....   [tags: George Orwell Literature Analysis Shooting Elephan]

Good Essays
942 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of The Article ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Throughout the many essays and articles I’ve read in class, “Shooting An Elephant” happened to be the most intriguing. The beginning of the essay may have lead me to believe that the story would simply be the author telling the story of how he shot an elephant in a foreign country. However, as I read more the issue became apparent. It’s basically as if the issue was shadowed by the author’s own story and to fully understand the issue you would have to actually pay attention to the author’s tone and emotions as well as the way in which he describes his actions....   [tags: Decision making, Cognition, Decision theory]

Better Essays
722 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

Shooting An Elephant By George Orwell

- After analyzing the evidence shown in “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, it becomes evident that the victims in this essay are the Burmese. The British imperialised Burma and took control of the Burmese, which in result created a bitter Anti-European stigma within Burma. The Burmese were jailed, forced to cram in the ill kept cages of their lock-ups, and beat with bamboos. They were thought to be worthless, as the British claimed that “an elephant was worth more than any damn Coringhee coolie” (5)....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire, Imperialism]

Strong Essays
1404 words | (4 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ‘Shooting an Elephant’ is a short story written by George Orwell in 1936. The story is about a young British man who serves as a police officer in Burma, which is part of British India in the 1920s. This policeman is torn between his hate for the British occupation and the abuse he gets from the natives on a daily basis. Politically, he is on the Burmese side because he despises the oppressive British rule in Burma. Even though he is against the occupation, he has to act superior over the natives in order to maintain British power over the land....   [tags: short story, British oppression in Burma]

Good Essays
593 words | (1.7 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Since the very first time I could see, my fascination with animals has followed me throughout my life. My childhood goal was to become a Veterinarian and although plans have changed, my passion for animals remains. Pets that I have taken under my wing become my responsibility and my family no matter how small or big they are. This is now the concept that most modern day families have adopted. Some people even consider them their children. Life, however, is not eternal for these little creatures, and like all living beings, their time is numbered....   [tags: animals, pet]

Better Essays
872 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

The Elephant as a Symbol for Imperialism in "Shooting an Elephant”

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell retold an occasion where he was struggling to come to a final decision of whether to shoot the elephant or not. With his final decision, the elephant finally lay dying in front of thousands of people. He said that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he also explained that he had to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” in front of the crowd (14). At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case....   [tags: Symbolism, British, Orwell]

Strong Essays
1173 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of The Poem ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The Lottery '

- A successful descriptive narrative gives the necessary information for a reader to know the material of a text. For instance, narrating the text of a story allows the audience to connect with the feelings of the narrator. A description incorporates visuals so that the audience can recognize the image being portrayed. “Shooting an Elephant” and “The Lottery” are both descriptive narratives. Descriptive narratives give the reader a clearer understanding of the passage. “Shooting an Elephant” is the stronger descriptive narrative because of vivid sensory detail, manipulating the perception of the reader, and Orwell’s use of conflict....   [tags: Narrative, Narrative mode, Narrator, Burma]

Better Essays
1065 words | (3 pages) | Preview

George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”, Orwell priorities the abuse of the Burmese people by the British Empire. Orwell uses the shooting of the elephant to the plight of the Burmese people and their unbroken will in some civil disobedience. The elephant represents a defiance of the British Empire. Also since he was seen as the figured head of the state he had to take action or ruin not only his own standings with the crowd but also with the face of the British Empire. When Orwell starts the essay he tells us how he was hated by the people....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire]

Better Essays
925 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

The Finale of Evil in Orwell's Shooting an Elephant

- In “Shooting an Elephant,” Orwell faces a dilemma: whether or not to kill the elephant. With his final decision, the elephant finally lays dead in front of thousands of people. He explains that he was forced to shoot it because the Burmese people were expecting him to do that. In addition, he has to do it “to avoid looking like a fool” (14) in front of the crowd. At first glance, one would think that it makes sense for him to kill the elephant to save his face, but that was not the case. He effectively uses this incident to demonstrate the “real nature of imperialism” (3), where the elephant represents the British Empire....   [tags: Imperialism, Analytical Essay]

Strong Essays
1234 words | (3.5 pages) | Preview

George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- George Orwell 's "Shooting an Elephant is a multifaceted essay that sheds light on the negative connotations that lie within Imperialism specifically in Burma, India. In Orwell 's writing he always finds a way to tackle prominent issues and mask them within stories that leave the reader thinking but without knowing, some examples of his works being his critically acclaimed novels Animal Farm and 1984. In “Shooting an Elephant”, he illustrates through a first person narration the actions of a British officer in Burma India and alludes that the title holds more than just “shooting an elephant.” Orwell shows the narrator and his inner turmoil in the face of the killing of an elephant in Burma a...   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, Imperialism]

Better Essays
1029 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

Descriptive Narrative Of ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The Lottery '

- A successful descriptive narrative displays the necessary information for a reader to explain or develop speculations within the material. Narrating the text of a story, told through one or more narrators, allows the audience to connect with the feelings of the narrator. A description includes imagery for the audience’s recognition. Furthermore, descriptive narratives have a purpose and are there for a reason. “Shooting an Elephant” and “The Lottery” are both descriptive narratives. Descriptive narratives show a clearer understanding of the passage; therefore, the stronger text is “Shooting an Elephant” because of its detail and the plot’s conflict....   [tags: Narrative, Narrative mode, Narrator, Narratology]

Better Essays
748 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- British author George Orwell was born in India and, after receiving his education in England, spent five years as an officer of the India Imperial Police from 1922 to 1927. In his essay titled “Shooting an Elephant”, Orwell reflects on a specific incident during his term as an Imperial officer which he claims gave him a deeper understanding of the evil nature of imperialism. Orwell explains the negative relationship between Europeans and the Burmese, and provides vivid imagery along with his point of view to identify the evil motive behind imperialism: pride....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, British Empire]

Better Essays
724 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

George Orwell 's Shooting An Elephant

- Sit. Stay. Shake. Speak. These are all commands that someone would voice to a dog, and expect it to follow accordingly. Dogs are known for their obedience and unbroken loyalty. They would do anything to please their masters; even put their selves in dangerous positions just to satisfy their authoritative masters. The question at hand is, would a human act just as obedient, no matter the circumstances. Some may deny that humans would be as accommodating as man’s best friend, but just a glimpse at past history could reveal otherwise....   [tags: McCarthyism, Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow]

Better Essays
1725 words | (4.9 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant

- “Shooting an Elephant” I was not comfortable with many aspects of this story. The prejudice throughout the book was unimaginable, I find I am uncomfortable with any kind of bigotry. Reading of the Burmese people and their disrespect toward someone who was there to “protect and serve”, was difficult. I suppose I am naïve, I try to hold on to the belief that people of God are inherently good. I know there are bad apples in all walks of life, bad people are everywhere so holding on to this optimism is harder each day....   [tags: essays research papers]

Good Essays
474 words | (1.4 pages) | Preview

Shooting An Elephant

- The story that my evaluation will be based on is Shooting an Elephant written in 1936. The author George Orwell was born in 1903 in India to a British officer raised in England. He attended Eton College, which introduced him to England’s middle and upper classes. He was denied a scholarship, which led him to become a police officer for the Indian Imperial in 1922. He served in Burma until resigning in 1927 due to the lack of respect for the justice of British Imperialism in Burma and India. He was now determined to become a writer, so at the brink of poverty he began to pay close attention to social outcasts and laborers....   [tags: essays research papers]

Strong Essays
1377 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant

- A police officer in the British Raj, the supposedly 'unbreakable'; ruling force, was afraid. With his gun aimed at a elephant's head, he was faced with the decision to pull the trigger. That officer was George Orwell, and he writes about his experience in his short story, 'Shooting an Elephant';. To save face, he shrugged it off as his desire to 'avoid looking the fool'; (George Orwell, 283). In truth, the atmosphere of fear and pressure overwhelmed him. His inner struggle over the guilt of being involved in the subjugation of a people added to this strain, and he made a decision he would later regret enough to write this story....   [tags: essays research papers]

Free Essays
422 words | (1.2 pages) | Preview

Free Will in Shooting an Elephant and Antigone

- Free Will in Shooting an Elephant and Antigone Free will can be defined as: “The right, given to humans by God, to make their own decisions.” A mans free will cannot be destroyed by any power other than God. Humans can always exercise their free will when making decisions. However, when their decisions come in conflict with the laws set by a higher power, they might face consequences based on how they choose to use their free will. The more restrictions imposed upon someone’s free will the more restricted their ability to make decisions become....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]

Free Essays
839 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell In his essay Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell explains how the controlling authorities in a hostile country are not controlling the country's population but are in fact a mere tool of the populous. Orwell's experience with the elephant provided the insight for his essay, and gives a clear example of the control the natives have over the authorities. The authorities in Lower Burma were there to police the state that their government controlled, but were only accomplished in being controlled by the people of the state....   [tags: Papers]

Good Essays
582 words | (1.7 pages) | Preview

George Orwells Shooting an Elephant

- George Orwells Shooting an Elephant In George Orwell's essay "Shooting An Elephant," he writes about racial prejudice. Orwell is a British officer in Burma. The author is, "for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British"(842). Orwell feels caught in the middle of this cultural struggle. He sympathizes with the oppressed people of India, but is treated poorly, since he is viewed as one of the oppressors. He comes to terms with the role he plays in this vicious cycle of oppression , as an imperial servant, and the influence it has on him to shoot an elephant....   [tags: essays papers]

Good Essays
483 words | (1.4 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX Shooting an Elephant Shooting an Elephant is an essay written by George Orwell about a troubling incident that took place while the author was serving as a sub divisional police officer. Published in 1936, the events of the essay take place in Burma during the British era of imperialism. Orwell illustrates the tense social climate in Burma through accounts of derision from the “sneering yellow faces” of the Burmese people.(Orwell) Many important themes are present in Shooting an Elephant, like imperialism, moral conflict, and pressure from expectations....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Causality]

Better Essays
1014 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

Analytical Summary Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ... On his way, he hears that the elephant that was causing trouble was actually a tamed elephant that went mad due to ‘must.’ He also learns that it had already wreaked massive havoc among the Burmese villages. Upon his arrival, he is perplexed at the conflicting testimonies of the natives, making him think that this incident is just a hoax. At that very moment, he sees a corpse of man that the elephant had trampled upon. Realizing the severity of the situation, he sends an orderly to get an elephant rifle and heads towards a paddy field where the elephant rests, followed by a large crowd of people....   [tags: imperialism, wishes, essay, officer]

Strong Essays
1059 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant by George Orwells, Writing and Discussion

- Orwell argues in “Shooting an Elephant ” that countries lose power went they become imperialist and totalitarian countries. In “Shooting an Elephant ” he gives the main character beliefs and the will to do the right thing. Despite the main character's sympathy for the people he severs, the people still ridicule him. When the protagonist gets the chance to please the people he does it because he does not want to look weak. He is an instrument of the will of the people he severs, just like totalitarian governments....   [tags: totalitarians, vietnam war, rules]

Good Essays
530 words | (1.5 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Generally, as a human being, one make choices that might have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author narrates an experience of his life when he has to choose the lesser of two evils. The story takes place at somehow times of imperialism during the five miserable years Orwell spends in Burma as a British police officer. Although Orwell repudiates his circumstance in life he has to kill an elephant, an invaluable work animal to save his honor. The despondent young officer Orwell lives in mental isolation....   [tags: British Empire, Colonialism, Imperialism, Empire]

Better Essays
1262 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

-   Times of Imperialism.  Generally, as a human being, one makes unintentional choices that have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author narrates an experience of his life when he has to choose the lesser of two evils. The story takes place during the five miserable years Orwell spends in Burma as a British police officer. Although Orwell repudiates his circumstance in life he has to kill an elephant, an invaluable work animal, to save his honor. The despondent young officer Orwell lives in mental isolation....   [tags: British Empire, Colonialism, Imperialism, Empire]

Better Essays
1271 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Times of Imperialism. Generally, as a human being, one makes unintentional choices that have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author narrates an experience of his life when he has to choose the lesser of two evils. The story takes place during the five miserable years Orwell spends in Burma as a British police officer. Although Orwell repudiates his circumstance in life he has to kill an elephant, an invaluable work animal, to save his honor. The despondent young officer Orwell lives in mental isolation....   [tags: British Empire, Colonialism, Imperialism, Empire]

Better Essays
1271 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Times of Imperialism. Generally, as a human being, one makes unintentional choices that have long-lasting effects. In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author narrates an experience of his life when he has to choose the lesser of two evils. The story takes place during the five miserable years Orwell spends in Burma as a British police officer. Although Orwell repudiates his circumstance in life he has to kill an elephant, an invaluable work animal, to save his honor. The despondent young officer Orwell lives in mental isolation....   [tags: British Empire, Colonialism, Imperialism, Empire]

Better Essays
1271 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- What to Follow: Ethics or Morals, Although ethics and morals are distinct knowledge from each other, people use the terms as if they are interchangeably because these words have shared a similar belief about what right and wrong. However, ethics define as a set of rules which come from an external sources like social system that tell people what right and wrong while morality refer to an individual’s internal principals that decide what good and bad. Conflicting in between ethics and morality hurt people in their career and every day decision making in every workplace....   [tags: Morality, Ethics, Virtue, Moral psychology]

Better Essays
1177 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”, the author describes how he is in a very special and difficult circumstance. The background information he provides in the introduction explains how he was born and raised in India, but attended school in England. Soon after, he became an officer for the English government but was stationed over in India during their imperialistic reign. This knowledge is essential to the reader in understanding Orwell’s thoughts and emotions while reading. Throughout the story, symbols such as the rifle, the elephant, and even Orwell himself represent the British’s power over the people, the evils of imperialism, and the slow decline of the British empire....   [tags: British Empire, Imperialism, Burma, Empire]

Better Essays
711 words | (2 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell 's A Collection of Essays he writes “Shooting an Elephant” and begins by portraying that imperialism/colonialism is an evil thing. I shall begin my paper by evaluating how imperialism creates hatred amongst the English colonizers and the Burman natives through the regulations that the British ruled over them. I shall also analyze how Orwell uses the elephant to portray various aspects of imperialism. I will then explore the elephant from the point of view of the young, uneducated english police officer....   [tags: Colonialism, British Empire, Police, Constable]

Better Essays
708 words | (2 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Power Struggle in Shooting an Elephant In the essay Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell, the ideas of power, imperialism and the struggle of the British Empire are the central themes in the text. The essay is based on Orwell’s personal experience with the imperial police and the British Empire in Burma. The text begins when Orwell is expressing how much he is hated by the locals in Burma, how he was always taunted, made fun of, and laughed at. One day, he got a call saying there was an elephant that had broken its chain and escaped....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire]

Better Essays
1340 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” deals with the nature of a human’s identity and ego. The story is set during the British colonization of Burma and discusses the ordeals of an English police officer stationed in the colony, who hates both his job and the people whom he polices. He faces many challenging decisions that put him in a place where he must either follow his own beliefs or fall to the will of the citizens of Burma. Throughout the story the officer is stuck with the decision of whether to do what he thinks is right, in order to preserve his ego or to do what the majority wants, in order to preserve his public identity....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Hatred]

Better Essays
982 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

Literary Analysis of “Shooting an Elephant,” by George Orwell

- ... Part five is the last paragraph, he tells us about why that he had to kill the elephant. At the beginning, Orwell claims that he is fully against the Imperialism and he describes it as “devil”. O well’s point is to use the image of the elephant as a metaphor to demonstrate the destructive and unethical power of the Imperialism. We can see the destruction of imperialism when Orwell depicts “An elephant was ravaging the bazaar” ()and “It had already destroyed somebody’s bamboo huts, kill a cow and raided some fruit-stalls and devoured the stock;” ()....   [tags: metaphor, imperialism, imagery]

Strong Essays
1146 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- …When The White Man Turns Tyrant It Is His Own Freedom That He Destroys: A Critical Analysis Of George Orwell’s “Shooting An Elephant” Killing an enemy chips away at your humanity. It is human nature to long for acceptance within one’s community. Often, one is forced to sacrifice bits of their morals to achieve this acceptance. In “Shooting an Elephant” Orwell illustrates this concept by recalling an incident that occurred during his time as a British police officer in Moulmein, Burma. The task he was set to accomplish while here was the dispatching of a renegade elephant....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, British Empire]

Better Essays
839 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- “All I can do is follow my instincts, because I 'll never please everyone.” -Emma Watson. Trying to please everyone will lead to a person being unhappy, because no matter how hard you try, can’t make everyone happy. When making a decision, the only person that can really tell me what is right for me is, me. No one knows how a decision will affect me in the future, economically, or even emotionally. At times decision can be made more difficult when everyone thinks that they know what is better and try and push me in the right direction “because I have been where you are before” which in my opinion can’t be true....   [tags: Burma, George Orwell, Cognition, Emotion]

Better Essays
921 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

An Exploration of British Injustice in Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

- ... This phrase shows not only how the people oppressed by the Imperialism suffer, but the tyrant itself by giving up his freedom. Through the way Orwell arrange this paragraph the audience can now truly understand Orwell’s argument about how Imperialism has negative effects on those in the power, and how ironically it is for Orwell to gain power and dominance over others, just to lose freedom and dominance over yourself. Through the essay, with the use of particular emotional words and sentences, the audience can perceive Orwell’s feelings and emotions, by the memorable amount of pathos over his essay....   [tags: imperialism, control, pressure]

Powerful Essays
1616 words | (4.6 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Inducting Imperialism Introduction Burma was imperialized during a time of political unrest over the wealth of the country through rich, natural resources. George Orwell, an experienced British officer and renowned novelist, uses his experience as an officer there to illustrate his claim that “imperialism is an evil thing” in his short story, “Shooting an Elephant.” (181) Imperialism is an extension of power that is common to industrialized nations because it allows powerful countries to go into troubled communities and help them advance, while at the same time gain access to their valuable resources....   [tags: British Empire, Imperialism, Burma, Colonialism]

Better Essays
1022 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- In George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant, the narrator is the main character of the story trapped in his own environment between righteousness and authority. He is unsure of his path on whether to defend the people of Burma from the oppression of the British ruling in which he serves that can lead him to losing his job as sub-divisional town of Burma, India. Orwell personally relates to the narrator that is reflected in his writing allowing the reader to get a glimpse of his political views. In the short story Orwell like the narrator was an Anglo-Indian official, a term used to describe all British people of mixed Indian and British descent....   [tags: British Empire, United Kingdom, British Raj]

Strong Essays
1187 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

British Imperialism Exposed in Shooting an Elephant, by George Orwell

- George Orwell was, without a doubt, one of the most influential authors of his time. His strong opposition to totalitarianism and imperialism made him one of the most recognizable names in literature during the 1900’s. Orwell spent 5 years as an imperial policeman in Burma, witnessing firsthand the effects of imperialism on the people of Burma (BBC). The insight he gained during those years made clear to him the injustices of colonization and fueled his opposition to totalitarianism....   [tags: British Imperialism Essays]

Powerful Essays
1479 words | (4.2 pages) | Preview

George Orwell's Shooting and Elephant and William Carlos Williams's The Use of Force

- George Orwell’s short story “Shooting and elephant” and William Carlos Williams “The use of force” both share the same theme which is violence. While these stories are very much different they share many similarities. They both commit an act of violence and those acts have different effects on the main characters of the stories. “The use of force” by William Carlos Williams is about a doctor who makes a home visit and wants to diagnose this child because he thinks she has Diphtheria. The doctor must examine her throat but it is not an easy task because it becomes a conflict between the doctor and the child....   [tags: theme of violence analysis]

Better Essays
809 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell, Brief Description of Words and Symbols

- 1. From the beginning of this essay Orwell’s purpose was never to shoot the elephant. In paragraph 3, lines eight through nine he explains not wanting to shoot it and speaks about bringing the gun to give the elephant a good fright. Leaving the gun at home or bringing the gun would have made no difference to what happened at the end. The gun was of little use, the main gun was not even his own but the riffle. 2. Orwell shot the elephant not to save the people in the village but for his own benefits....   [tags: irony, epiphany, coolie]

Better Essays
860 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

Brutal Honesty Hits The Unsuspecting Mark. Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant '

- Brutal Honesty Hits the Unsuspecting Mark The memorial account George Orwell details, of his confrontation with an elephant gone mad, in his essay, Shooting An Elephant (1946) is engaging and thought provoking. Born in 1903, in Bengal, India to a British Colonial civil servant, Orwell states in his most powerful essay against imperialism, “I perceived in this moment that when the white man turns tyrant it is his own freedom that he destroys,” (Orwell, 1946, para.7). In a disarmingly musing, sort of style, Orwell makes his point....   [tags: George Orwell, Burma, British Empire]

Better Essays
1251 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of The Poem ' Civil Disobedience ' By Harlan Ellison And ' Shooting An Elephant '

- The world roughly hold about seven billion people. People from different backgrounds, nationality, race, but there is a high percentage of people in this world that struggle to make moral decisions on their own because they are scared of becoming an outcast, an enemy. In addition, this cycle causes people to be controlled by the society and not make decisions that would possibly better them but rather turn them into the society’s robot. In essays such as, “‘Repent Harlequin’ Said the Ticktock Man” and “Shooting an Elephant,” written by Harlan Ellison and George Orwell, respectively, each character faces a conflict with themselves by not using their own moral sense and getting faced with chal...   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, Civil disobedience]

Strong Essays
1553 words | (4.4 pages) | Preview

Analysis Of George Orwell 's ' Shooting An Elephant ' And ' The War Prayer '

- Imperialism, is it the big, bad master who enslaves the good, little child or is it the good, big master who protects the bad, little child. As history has shown in the past; sometimes, it is both. Through examination of three important pieces of literature “Shooting an Elephant by G. Orwell, White Man’s Burden by R. Kipling, and The War Prayer by M. Twain, it becomes obvious that there are serious consequences in supporting imperialistic ideals. Three very important ideas about Imperialism can be gleaned from these writings, which then provide a distinct concept about the subject....   [tags: British Empire, Colonialism, Imperialism, Empire]

Better Essays
1254 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

Colonialism and Imperialism Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness

- Destructive Colonization Exposed in Shooting an Elephant and Heart of Darkness       As a man is captured, his first instinct is to try and break free from his shackles and chains. Primal urges such as this often accompany humans when they are forced, as in capture, to rely on their most basic instincts to survive. In this manner, natives in Africa acted upon instinct when the Europeans arrived to take their land and freedom. The short story Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell and the novel Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad revolve around the time when colonialism had a foothold in many parts of the world....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

Strong Essays
1358 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

Critical Response- George Orwells Shooting And Elephant

- Critical Response Essay I class, we read a short story by George Orwell called Shooting an Elephant. It was a story about courage, judgment, and the pressure of peers. I personally did not like this story. I found it boring, pointless, and just another "hasn’t -this -happened -to -you" story about nothing. However, it was very well written, and if I had to critically respond to this story, I would praise the author on a number of things. The story opens by describing the relationship between the town and himself, a sort of sub-division police officer of the town....   [tags: essays research papers]

Free Essays
377 words | (1.1 pages) | Preview

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.


Your search returned over 400 essays for "Shooting an Elephant"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>