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Plato and Aristotle

- According to Plato, a just person can be related to a just society; both of them function similarly as a whole. Social justice occurs when each member of society plays the role for which his nature best suits him. Individual or moral justice occurs when the individual is harmonizing and keep all factors of his being in balance. Plato's view of a just society and a just individual is the aspiration for the gain of the whole over the individual. All of these ideas ties together Plato's ideal republic....   [tags: Ethics]

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plato & aristotle

- In these sessions, I have gained a better understanding of Aristotle and Plato’s ideas and theories. Particularly, I have a specific interest in Aristotle and the notion of the two extremes and to aim towards the “gray or middle of the road”. I also have an interest in Plato’s theory regarding the just and unjust and the repercussions of their actions. Aristotle is trying to achieve that single point in which life is the best of both worlds. He attempts to define an obtainable median point in life....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Machiavelli And Plato

- Niccolio Machiavelli (Born May 3rd, 1469 &#8211; 1527 Florence, Italy.) His writings have been the source of dispute amongst scholars due to the ambiguity of his analogy of the &#8216;Nature of Politics'; and the implication of morality. The Prince, has been criticised due to it&#8217;s seemingly amoral political suggestiveness, however after further scrutiny of other works such as The Discourses, one can argue that it was Machiavelli&#8217;s intention to infact imply a positive political morality....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Poetry and Music for Plato

- When he wrote The Republic, Plato recognized the need for the rulers or `guardians' of his kallipolis to be good and righteous. He also realized that "imitations practiced from youth become part of nature" (Plato, Republic, 395d). It was with these two thoughts in mind that Plato decided to censor poetry and representations in the education of the guardians. He felt that, in portraying gods and heroes as slavish and iniquitous, poets, playwrights, musicians and storytellers encouraged people to imitate and adopt iniquitous and slavish natures or habits....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Plato's View in Human Knowledge

- Plato's View in Human Knowledge Plato presents three different views about knowledge in Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus. In Meno's case, Plato believes knowledge as something innate in us when we are born; in his later view, in Republic, Plato believes we perceive things and gain knowledge; and from the last view, in Theaetus, Plato believes knowledge is the combination of a true opinion and a rational opinion. Strangely enough, Plato's views in Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus are similar, regarding the characteristics of knowledge....   [tags: Papers]

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Do Not Assume Socrates Opinions Are those of Plato

- While Plato records Socrates’ words and dialogues, it cannot be assumed that the opinions Socrates expresses are those of Plato. However, in the discussion of imitation in Republic, Book III the two philosophers’ views align. Plato’s use of the various types of narrative Socrates outlines displays the very point Socrates concludes on concerning imitation and conveys Plato’s ultimate point about imitation, that only good men performing good actions should be imitated. During the discussion with Thrasymachus in Book I Plato uses the different forms of narrative to the same effect Socrates describes in Book III while discussing imitation....   [tags: debates, narrative, imitation]

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Plato: The Grandfather of Democracy

- Plato: The Grandfather of Democracy The history and the evolution of what we know as law, has developed out of many different viewpoints and philosophies. It has been the result of the operational and manipulative aspects of public affairs, and also seems to be the creation of different philosophical systems. There have been many that have been innovators in this area of thought from political leaders and dictators, to others who were simple political idealists and philosophers. Through the wisdom and teachings of Plato, law has evolved into many different systems, and through this paper we will discuss the impact this particular philosopher had had on our modern system of democracy....   [tags: Papers]

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Relating Socrates to Platos the Republic

- By studying a variety of events and people involved in the Peloponnesian War and the Theban play Antigone, it becomes noticeable that many of these events and people can be explained through Platonic terms. Throughout the Republic, Plato conveys his philosophical thoughts about democracy, justice, and education in a society through his main character Socrates. As Socrates encounters many enlightened people of his time, he questions them on rhetorical issues dealing with society and human nature....   [tags: World Cultures]

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Plato

- Plato was a philosopher and educator in ancient Greece. He was one of the most important thinkers and writers in the history of Western culture. Plato was born in Athens into a family that was one of the oldest and most distinguished in the city. His father Ariston died when Plato was only a child. The name Plato was a nickname meaning broad shoulders. Plato's real name was Aristocles. Plato had aspirations of becoming a politician, however these hopes were destroyed when his friend Socrates was sentenced to death in 299 B.C....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Justice Exemplified by Plato and Thucydides

- Plato's Book I of The Republics presents three fundamental views on justice which are exemplified in Thucydides' On Justice, Power and Human Nature. Justice is illustrated as speaking the paying one's debts, helping one's friends and harming one's enemies, and the advantage of the stronger. In both their works, Plato and Thucydides write of the view that justice is honoring one's debts. In The Republics, Cephalus asserts that justice is "the truth and giving back what a man has taken from another." In other words, he believes that we should be truthful and pay back our debts to man and the gods....   [tags: Comparative Literature]

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Classical Theories - Aristotle and Plato

- Plato and Aristotle have both documented strong opinions about the influence and social purpose of poetry. Plato, in The Republic, outlines reasons for his `refusal to admit the imitative kind of poetry'(Plato cited in ed. Adams 1992, p. 31). Plato's reference to `poetry' does not apply to the poetry of contemporary society, as it was a performance art and not meant for silent reading and reflection. Julia Annas (1981, p. 94) believes that Plato's concern `was with popular culture, the culture that surrounds children as they grow up; in a present-day setting his concern would be with novels, (TV and movies)'; such as the 2003 movie House of Sand and Fog....   [tags: Personal Essays]

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Plato's Ideas of an Inefficient Democracy

- Plato's Ideas of an Inefficient Democracy Plato's Republic describes precisely how he feels about society and what the true meaning of justice is within that society. Plato feels that a city can only function if each of pieces does its part and nothing else. He also thinks that a perfect society should run on a distinct social scale. This scale descends in the order from the philosopher kings to the guardians to the craftspeople. His ideal society would be run in the form of an aristocracy where the philosopher kings use the guardians to ultimately rule the lowly craftspeople....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's Theory of Human Knowledge

- Plato's Theory of Human Knowledge Plato contended that all true knowledge is recollection. He stated that we all have innate knowledge that tells us about the things we experience in our world. This knowledge, Plato believed, was gained when the soul resided in the invisible realm, the realm of The Forms and The Good. Plato's theory of The Forms argued that everything in the natural world is representative of the ideal of that form. For example, a table is representative of the ideal form Table....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato

- In 428 B.C. Aristocles (later known as Plato) was born in Athens. He was born on the island of Aegina, which lies just twelve miles off shore from Athens in the Saronic Gulf (Havelock 3). Aristocles was born into a great political family (Friedlander 14). His father being the descendant of Codrus, the last king of Athens, and his mother was descendant from the great Athenian law maker Solon (Friedlander 15). Like most adolescent children his ambitions were far from anything his parents had ever done....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics on How to Live One's Life

- In the history of early philosophy, there were 3 prominent views on how to live one's life. These were presented by Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics. Plato, presenting the most simple of the three, believed that one should direct their life towards virtue, morality, and harmony of the soul. Explaining himself in his work Gorgias, Plato has Socrates and Polus talking to each other about the relation between happiness and wrong doing. Polus answers yes, happiness and wrong doing go together. Furthering his answer, Polus describes how a happy man is a powerful man....   [tags: history of early philosphy]

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Plato

- Plato (circa 428-c. 347 BC) Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens. His father, Ariston, was believed to have descended from the early kings of Athens. Perictione, his mother, was distantly related to the 6th- century BC lawmaker Solon. When Plato was a child, his father died, and his mother married Pyrilampes, who was an associate of the statesman Pericles. As a young man Plato had political ambitions, but he became disillusioned by the political leadership in Athens. He eventually became a disciple of Socrates, accepting his basic philosophy and dialectical style of debate: the pursuit of truth through questions, answers, and additional questions....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato

- Plato Plato was born in Athens to a wealthy family and lived from 429-347 B.C.E. He was Socrates' greatest student and held his teacher in such high regard that in most of his works Socrates plays the main character. Some people doubt the existance of Socrates but, "like nearly everyone else who appears in Plato's works, he is not an invention of Plato: there really was a Socrates" (Kraut). Plato wrote many works asking questions about terms such as justice, piety, and immortality to name a few....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophers]

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Justice In Book I Of The Republic

- The Republic of Plato begins in a similar fashion that many other Platonic dialogues begin, with that of a question. The conversation between Socrates and the aged Cephalus becomes a philosophical discussion of what advantages money has brought to Cephalus' life. Cephalus replies that money has allowed him "to tell the truth and pay one's debts" (331 b). Nevertheless, Socrates believes this does not portray an accurate description of what justice is. The rest of the first book is a discussion of the definition of justice, mainly that of Thrasymachus' definition....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Education: Keeping the Republic Together

- Education: Keeping the Republic Together Our world today puts huge amounts of emphasis on education, specifically in order to get a better job, make more money or take enjoyment in what we do. We see a similar importance placed on education in Socrates’ make believe city, as described in Plato’s Republic. However, Socrates has made it clear that this education is not for personal betterment or gain, but rather for the common good. Socrates has created his Republic with education of its citizens at the core....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato

- Plato Biography Plato was born in Athens of an aristocratic family. He recounts in the Seventh Letter, which, if genuine, is part of his autobiography, that the spectacle of the politics of his day brought him to the conclusion that only philosophers could be fit to rule. After the death of Socrates in 399, he travelled extensively. During this period he made his first trip to Sicily, with whose internal politics he became much entangled. He visited Sicily at least three times in all and may have been richly subsidised by Dionysius....   [tags: Papers]

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Comparing Oresteia and The Republic

- Comparing Oresteia and The Republic The tragic poet Aeschylus, and the philosopher Plato have arguably written two of the most influencing works ever in western history. The Oresteia, and The Republic each respectively depicts its individual accounts of how justice came to exist in human society. In the ancient In the famous dialogs of Socrates, The Republic attempts to analyze society rationally and change the state so that individuals could attain the Socratic goal of moral excellence. For Socrates, the just state could not be founded on tradition because tradition was not based on rational thinking, nor on the doctrine of power and strength being right....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato

- Since the human beings came together and began to live communities, necessities to be administrated became the most important subject for human kind. There were said many things on this issue; there have been put many claims and interpretations on well, just and equal administration by many philosophers. They searched for the best administration that will guide people equally, just and well; that will provide sustainability, peace and prosperity between communities. In fact there are many forms of government that operating in the world....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato: Patriot Or Dissident

- Plato, the Greek philosopher is considered to be one of the greatest thinkers in history and is called by one scholar “the fountainhead through which all western thought flows.” In his book The Republic he outlines what the perfect city-state would look like and how it would operate. Along his path of reason he makes no attempt to hide his disdain for other political systems. That includes democracy, a system he does not seem to agree with. In fact, from what I read, Plato obviously disagrees with democracy and its principals....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Socrates and Thrasymachus in Republic

- Socrates and Thrasymachus in Republic Socrates and Thrasymachus have a dialogue in Chapter 2 of Republic which progresses from a discussion of the definition of morality, to an understanding of the expertise of ruling, and eventually to a debate on the state of human nature. The Thrasymachian view of human nature has interesting implications in regards to Thomas Nagel’s ideal of egalitarianism, and Barbara Ehrenreich’s discontentment with the economic disparity in our democratic society. Although Thrasymachus is thwarted in conversation, Glaucon finds the outcome not entirely conclusive and directs Socrates to proving that morality, in and of itself, is a worthwhile pursuit....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays]

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Analysis of Thrasymachus' Argument in The Republic

- Thrasymachus has just stated, "Justice is nothing other than the advantage of the stronger", and is now, at the request of Socrates, clarifying his statement.<p> <i>"'Don't you know that some cities are ruled by tyranny, some by a democracy, and some by an aristocracy?' 'Of Course.' 'And in each city this element is stronger, namely, the ruler?' 'Certainly.' 'And each makes laws to its own advantage. Democracy makes democratic laws, tyranny makes tyrannical laws, and so on with the others. And they declare what they have made - what is to their own advantage - to be just for their subjects, and they punish anyone who goes against this as lawless and unjust....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Plato

- Plato The first degree of belief are physical objects, as the second degree of belief are shadows and images of the physical objects. In the last book, Plato criticizes poetry and the fine arts. Plato feels that art is merely the imitation of the imitation of reality, and that poetry corrupts the soul. Socrates says that artists merely create things. As an example, if a painter draws a couch on his canvas, he is creating a couch. But the couch he creates is not the real couch, it is nothing but a copy of an ordinary, physical couch which was created by a craftsman....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophers Essays]

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plato

- Discuss Plato’s Parable of the Cave. Plato’s parable of the cave, also known as the “allegory of the cave, opulently describes beneficial metaphors and elaborate imagery about knowledge, ignorance, truth and lastly enlightenment. The allegory of the cave appears at the beginning of Book VII of Plato’s The Republic, which in itself is principally a study of justice, government and leadership. In The Republic, Plato describes a cave containing individuals confined to the cave floor, bound by shackles....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato

- Socrates' ideal city is described through Plato in his work The Republic, some questions pondered through the text could be; How is this an "ideal" city formed, and is justice in the city relative to that of the human soul. I believe Socrates found the true meaning of justice in the larger atmosphere of the city and applied that concept to the human soul. Socrates describes his idea of an "ideal city" as one that has all the necessary parts to function and to show that justice is truly the harmony between the three stages of the city and soul in the human body....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato's Concept of Democracy and Justice

- Book one of Plato's Republic examines the concept of democracy and justice. Thrasymachus, the Sophist declares that justice is the advantage of the stronger, whereas Socrates argues that justice is wisdom, something good and desirable. According to this in Athenian times, a democracy could not survive with out a system of justice in place. This still holds true in the contemporary Western world. Throughout the dialogue of book one, Socrates, Cephalus, Polemarchus and Thrasymachus are trying to reach a definition of justice....   [tags: Philosophy]

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The Republic Does Justice Pay

- The Republic Does Justice Pay In the Introduction of Plato's Republic, a very important theme is depicted. It is the argument of whether it is beneficial for a person to lead a good and just existence. The greatly argued position that justice does not pay, is argued by three men Thrasymachus, Glaucon, and Adeimantus. By incorporating all three men into a collective effort I believe I can give a more flattering depiction of injustice. First, we must explore the basis of the moral skepticism argument in The Republic, given by Thrasymachus....   [tags: Papers]

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Comparing Aristotle and Plato

- Comparing Aristotle and Plato Aristotle argues that in order for a polis to emerge, a union between man and women must convene. Later a household must be introduced which unites with other households to form a village, villages come together to form city-states. This theory is Aristotle’s natural view that an individual can not be self sufficient Plato argues that, in order to achieve absolute justice, a city-state is needed. In The Republic, Plato builds around the idea of Philosopher Rulers....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's View on Lying

- Plato's View on Lying What is a lie. And when is it appropriate to tell a lie. Are two questions to think about after reading Plato's Republic translated by G.M.A Grube. A lie by definition is a false statement intended to deceive. Most people would agree this is not a "just" thing to do to your friends. In American society today, lying has always been a "bad" thing to do. Trust is very important, parents always tell their kids never to lie or they will loose their trust. Plato disagrees, with what most parents say to their children....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's View on Life

- Plato's View on Life In his book titled The Republic Plato arises many questions concerning the philosophy of life. One of the most difficult subjects that he touches is the definition of justice. He tries to explain to his fellow friends how is the good man supposed to behave, and which is better to be just or unjust but that answer becomes very complicated and leads Plato to examine that rather complex subject in great detail. He demolishes the three popular definitions of justice that are brought up, which imply that justice is " paying one's debts," "helping friends and harming enemies," and "whatever is to the advantage of the stronger" and argues that these definitions are not compl...   [tags: Papers]

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Comparing Aristotle and Plato

- Comparing Aristotle and Plato We have two great philosophers, Plato and Aristotle. These are great men, whose ideas have not been forgotten over years. Although their thoughts of politics were similar, we find some discrepancies in their teachings. The ideas stem from Socrates to Plato to Aristotle. Plato based moral knowledge on abstract reason, while Aristotle grounded it on experience and tried to apply it more to concrete living. Both ways of life are well respected by many people today. Plato started his teachings in remembrance of his good friend, Socrates....   [tags: Papers]

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PLato

- The focus of Socrates at this time in Plato’s Republic is of the ideal city and how it can be traced to the human soul. Socrates believes that the city he has proposed to the other men is perfect in itself. He says that this city possesses four virtues which are the base for the city being perfect. These are the virtues of wisdom, courage, moderation and lastly but most importantly is the virtue of justice. He breaks down the city into classes and he says how each man within the city is responsible for what his life work is....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Comparing Plato and Aristotle

- Comparing Plato and Socrates Plato was among the most important and creative thinkers of the ancient world. He was born in Athens in 428 BC to an aristocratic and well-off family. Even as a young child Plato was familiar with political life because his father, Ariston was the last king of Athens. Ariston died when Plato was a young boy. However, the excessive Athenian political life, which was under the oligarchical rule of the Thirty Tyrants and the restored democracy, seem to have forced him to give up any ambitions of political life....   [tags: Philosophy]

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The Republic Book 1

- The Republic Book 1 Book 1 of Plato's Republic raises the question what is justice. Four views of justice are examined. The first is that justice is speaking the truth and paying one's debt. The second is that justice is helping one's friends and harming one's enemies. The third view of justice is that it is to the advantage of the stronger. The last view is that injustice is more profitable than justice. The book begins by explaining that at the time many Athenians are celebrating the introduction of a new goddess at the city of Piraeus....   [tags: Papers]

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Platos Republic

- Plato's Republic Critics of The Republic, Plato's contribution to the history of political theory, have formed two distinct opinions on the reasoning behind the work. The first group believes that The Republic is truly a model for a political society, while the other strongly objects to that, stating it as being far too fantastic for any society to operate successfully by these suggested methods. In an exchange between Crito and Dionysius, this argument is first introduced, with Crito siding with those who agree that The Republic is a realistic political model, and Dionysius arguing on behalf of those who doubt it as being realistic, claiming it to be a criticism of politics in gener...   [tags: essays research papers]

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Platos Republic

- Introduction Platonic philosophy begins to appear in the middle dialogues. What are the important elements of this philosophy. The middle dialogues are dominated by the theory of the Forms. This is a theory that Plato developed from certain seldom-stated assumptions that Socrates held. Socrates' view was that the reason he and his interlocutors failed to find definitions for things was that they were stuck in case-based, specific examples. Does bravery mean fighting against a person stronger than yourself, or does it mean having the courage to back down from the fight and accept the insults of cowardice that come with that....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Literary Works of Plato: Critical Essay

- This essay attempts to present a critical analysis of the literary works of Plato. Plato's literary work span is wide containing issues pertaining to justice, social life, specific virtues, good ruler's knowledge, value of justice, love and many others. The philosophical tones of Plato resembled very much with that of Socrates addressing the similar issues in his own Platonic version of dialogues. The Republic and the citizen played an important role in his work in addressing to the various social issues and intricate understanding of the human nature of human responsibilities in a republic....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Plato Vs Shelley

- Many works of literature provide responses to much debated topics. Opinions are brought forth by means of rhetorical devices and supported by some type of accepted truth. In two such pieces, The Republic by Plato and “A Defense of Poetry” by Shelley, Plato expresses a belief about poetry that Shelley disagrees with and responds to. Through rhetorical devices such as metaphors and symbolism and the use of deductive logic and Socratic writing, Plato provides a strong, very supported argument while Shelley’s long sentence structure, analogies and metaphors are weak in comparison....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato's Writings

- Plato's Writings Plato's profound early writing on politics, ethics and education discussed in the Republic are the foundations of today's governments, nations and discourses. At least that is what I am told. Plato's ideology and reasoning are not always the most believable and desirable, it makes me wonder which part of today's government practices must give due to the Republic (to be discovered in Gov 101). While it is easy to be disgusted with Plato's idealism and philosophy, which seems to deter any type of an acceptable nightlife, it does leave the reader with a desire to keep trudging through endless mounds of self-indulged prose to discover Plato's reasoning....   [tags: Papers]

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A life sketch of Plato and his works

- If Thales was the first of all the great Greek philosophers, Plato must remain the best known of all the Greeks. The original name of this Athenian aristocrat was Aristiclis, but in his school days he received the nickname "Platon" (meaning "broad") because of his broad shoulders. Plato was born in Athens, Greece to one of the oldest and most distinguished families in the city. He lived with his mother, Perictione, and his father, Ariston (Until Ariston died.) Born in an aristocratic and rich family, Plato’s childhood was indulged within luxury....   [tags: essays research papers]

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What Plato Meant by the Form of the Good

- What Plato Meant by the Form of the Good The basis of Plato's philosophy is his theory of Ideas, or doctrine of Forms while the notion of Forms is essential to Plato's philosophy, over years of philosophical study, it has been difficult to understand what these Forms are supposed to be, and the purpose of their existence. When examining Plato's forms and evaluating the theory, some conclusions have proved to be unclear and unanswered. However, the doctrine of Forms is essential to Plato's philosophy....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato Vs. Aristotle

- Plato vs. Aristotle Plato and Aristotle, two philosophers in the 4th century, hold polar views on politics and philosophy in general. This fact is very cleverly illustrated by Raphael's "School of Athens" (1510-11; Stanza della Segnatura, Vatican), where Plato is portrayed looking up to the higher forms; and Aristotle is pointing down because he supports the natural sciences. In a discussion of politics, the stand point of each philosopher becomes an essential factor. It is not coincidental that Plato states in The Republic that Philosopher Rulers who possess knowledge of the good should be the governors in a city state....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato's Moral Psychology

- Plato's Moral Psychology I argue that Plato's psychological theories are motivated by concerns he had about moral theory. In particular, Plato rejects the modern account of rationality as the maximization of subjectively evaluated self-interest because, had he adopted such an account, his theory of justice would be subject to criticisms which he holds are fatal to the contractarian theory of justice. While formulating a theory to remain within ethical constraints sometimes violates the canons of scientific theorizing, Plato avoids this mistake....   [tags: Argumentative Rationality Argument Papers]

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How Plato Uses the Myth of the Cave

- How Plato Uses the Myth of the Cave Could reality be the greatest special effect of all time. Since the 6th century B.C.E a growth in human knowledge and understanding had occurred and people began to question the world rd they lived in, these people were called philosophers. Thales, Anaximander, Anaximines, Pythagoras, Heraclitus and Socrates were all highly regarded intellectuals but one man's thoughts on the world stood out. Plato is probably the best known of al the ancient Greek philosophers....   [tags: Papers]

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The Perspective of Plato and Aristotle on the Value of Art

- The Perspective of Plato and Aristotle on the Value of Art   As literary critics, Plato and Aristotle disagree profoundly about the value of art in human society. Plato attempts to strip artists of the power and prominence they enjoy in his society, while Aristotle tries to develop a method of inquiry to determine the merits of an individual work of art. It is interesting to note that these two disparate notions of art are based upon the same fundamental assumption: that art is a form of mimesis, imitation....   [tags: Philosophy Essays]

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What is Plato's notion of a soul?

- Greeks started to wonder about the living things and their connection with the divine. Many philosophers had different beliefs towards the connection between body, soul and divine. Plato was the first man to ask about the existence of the soul and he came to the conclusion that the soul and the body are complementary, yet absolutely different from each other. The soul is the organ that connects the body and the divine. The body is an instrument of perception to the soul. The body without the soul is just a corpse....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Plato, Aristotle and Augustine’s Contrasting Views about Women

- With respect to their differing philosophical beliefs, philosophers Plato and Aristotle would ultimately argue with respect to women and their place in society, the home, and their relationship with politics. Although, Augustine was not a philosopher, he would often make references about women. Most often, Augustine would abide by the teachings of his religion in explaining women and their place not only the confines of a marriage, but also, in relation to God. The importance of their views with respect to women, politics and religion have arguably shaped the ideals and social morals of current Western thought and ideologies....   [tags: Women and Society]

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Plato´s Philosophy in The Rupublic

- Plato was born around 428 BC, in Athens. As a child, his father died, his mother was a widow: someone who lost their husband and is single however, that did not last too long, because his mother remarried to a man named Pyrilampes. Plato was at birth, named Aristolcles, and had the title of Plankton. He had great interest in poetry and music; he was especially good in philosophy, which dealt with theoretical principles, and a field of philosophy called epistemology that explained human knowledge, and nature....   [tags: courage, justice, ideas, live, writings]

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A View into the Allegory of the Cave

- In the time of the Greek Empire, when they defined themselves as the world power, the creation and development of sciences both physical and social were in a revolution. One notable science that saw strides of development were the sciences of philosophy, a system of logic, debate and desire for wisdom. The most noted and heard of these men was the formidable Aristotle, but the importance here is in a student, Plato. Plato was an idealistic philosopher, who saw beyond physical constraints of life into his higher beliefs of formless ideas being a truth of life and reality....   [tags: Plato's Philosophies, Greek Empire]

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An Analysis of Plato’s Allegory of the Cave and the Importance of Light in Discovering Truth

- In The Republic, Plato introduces a philosophy that transcends the exclusivity of the contemplative and the active lives. He defines the ultimate truth as “aletheia”, which literally translates to mean “unhidden” or “that which does not remain unnoticed”. Through his use of the term and his allegory of the cave, Plato makes the strong implication that philosophers must actively seek to discover the absolute truth, rather than relying on traditional methods of contemplation and the persuasive tone of rhetoric to prove its existence....   [tags: Greek Literature]

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Can We Say that the Selection of the Best and Able and Then Educating Them to Become True Leaders Is Better than Popular Vote to Choose Leaders?

- Before trying to answer this question, let me first talk about Plato’s principle of specialization and why he was against popular vote. This paper will show that popular vote is better than the selection of the best and ablest for a position of a leader In Plato’s just society, people should be selected for a particular work or duty in their early childhood and be trained to perform that work or duty. According to the principle of specialization, people of the state are divided into three categories: these are producers, guardians, and rulers....   [tags: Plato's principle of speicalization]

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Plato's Allegory of the Cave

- Plato is one of the most iconic authors in the history of philosophy. Even today, his words live strong in modern thinking and society. He was a highly spoken citizen of Athens (Kraut, 2013). His input in the politics and the society of Athenian life made him a major player in the success of democracy in ancient civilization (Kraut, 2013). Being one of the first real “philosophers” in history, Plato was looked up to by scholars of that time, as well as current philosophers of our time. His most influential work of writing is The Republic where he makes many assumptions while also including ideas and conversations with other thinkers of the time like Socrates and Thrasymachus (Kraut, 2013)....   [tags: history of philosophy]

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Cartesian and Platonic Philosophical Themes in The Matrix

- This essay will examine the philosophical questions raised in the movie The Matrix. It will step through how the questions from the movie directly relate to both skepticism and the mind-body problem, and further how similarly those problems look to concepts raised by both Descartes’ and Plato’s philosophies. It will attempt to show that many of the questions raised in the movie are metaphor for concepts from each philosopher’s works, and why those concepts are important in relation to how they are presented in the film....   [tags: Cartesian Dualism, Descartes, Plato]

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Formation of Real Truth: Plato's Allegory of the Cave and Shakespeare's Othello

- Truth is an objective in a person’s life in which a journey is taken to find the answer to their question or an identity of themselves or others. In Plato’s allegory of the cave The Republic VII, Plato discusses the steps that is needed to taken to find the real truth to one’s self. These theory created by the world famous philosopher can be related to many text and life on how truth is formed. Plato relates the Republic VII to a cave and how a man must step out the darkness of the cave and its many obstacles to find real truth....   [tags: Stereotypes, Tragic Events]

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Skepticism in The Film Matrix and The Allegory of The Cave

- Skepticism deals with a person’s belief and if the person can truly trust their senses. As Plato, Descartes, and the creators of The Matrix express in their writings and movies is the possibility of a person’s senses being deceived as there is no proof that the five sense of the person’s body is not being altered as the senses are all processed within the mind. There is no proof that the whole world is real, but people have to trust in their senses in order to believe this. However, these senses of sight, smell, sound, and so forth could be tricked....   [tags: plato, descartes, belief]

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Foundations of Political Thought

- Aristotle and Socrates and Plato’s beliefs have similarities mainly evident in their denouncement of democracy for the state. The views of Socrates expressed and written by his pupil Plato are vastly philosophical in nature and he promotes the idea of questioning life to achieve insight. The philosophers who possess the absolute truth are the best equipped to rule society according to Plato and his Allegory of the Cave. Conversely, Aristotle takes a more political science approach of discussing and analyzing various constitutions to determine the best form of government, where the rational beings in a society are the natural rulers....   [tags: Philosophy, Aristotle, Socrates, Plato]

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The Commitments of Machiavelli's Scholar

- Plato and Aristotle's worries in The Republic and Politics was understanding virtue and justice, and figuring out who was best fit to lead. In both cases, Plato and Aristotle were worried about the political community on the loose, and about how morals and politics met. Nicolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke question this suspicion to some degree, and relate their own particular worries about great government, request, and human nature. This exposition will differentiate the works of Machiavelli, concerning his understanding of government....   [tags: plato, aristotle, government, philosophy]

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The More Machiavellian the Better

- Machiavelli, a philosopher from the Renaissance, makes a profound statement in his work, The Prince. An excerpt from this book, "The Morals of the Prince", clearly establishes a view which, at the time of its publishing, was very controversial. Now, however, his work can be related to today's society, and it is very useful in regards to helping someone understand how mankind should be managed. He posits the importance of using virtues and vices in moderation in order to be a successful leader. In today's rambunctious and contemporary society, men are not governed as they should be, due to corruption and neglect....   [tags: the morals fo the prince, Plato]

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Aristotle: The Pursuit of Happiness

- Aristotle and Plato both are both well known for their focus on defining the purpose of being human. To them, humans have a particular characteristic that no other living thing possesses. That characteristic is that humans strive to achieve a level of goodness. Although they agree with each other that there is a highest good one must achieve in order to live a fulfilling life, they have different ideas on what that good is. On Aristotle’s search to find the highest good of a human being, he first asked what the ergon, or task, of being human is....   [tags: plato, human being, philosophy]

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The Relationship of Allegory of the Cave to Learning and Education

- The Relationship of "Allegory of the Cave" to Learning and Education The "Allegory of the Cave" is Plato's attempt to explain the relationship between knowledge and ignorance. Starting with the image of men in fetters that limit their movement and force them to look only ahead, this is the idea that all men and women are bound by the limits of their ignorance. Men and women are restricted by the limits of the education of their parents and the small amounts that can be culled from their environment....   [tags: Plato Philosophy]

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Plato's Worldview and How Humans Exist Within It

- Plato's Worldview and How Humans Exist Within It Plato lived in a very exciting time in history. The post-Socratic era had merits for exploration totally new to him. The idea that science and reason could be applied to more than static issues such as logistics and geometry, allowing the thinking men of the time the opportunity to examine the world around them with structured thought. He, like his mentor, was not happy with what science gave as answers to life. Though it gave a structure the world, It denoted a typically atheist view on the world....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's Dialogue

- Persons & Scenery The involved characters are Socrates (the narrator); Glaucon (Plato’s brother); Adeimantus (another brother of Plato’s); Polemarchus; Cephalus; Thrasymachus; Cleitophon; And others who were mute auditors. The scenery is the house of Polemarchus and his father Cephalus at the Piraeus. The dialogue is narrated by Socates the day after it took place to: Timaeus, Hemocates, Critias, and a nameless person. Structure Of The Dialogue Book I of The Republic focus on a passion Socrates had, that is not defining justice in its word meaning, but rather finding out the very nature of justice....   [tags: Philosophy ]

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Comparing Plato and Aristotle's Acquisition of Ethical Understanding

- Comparing Plato and Aristotle's Acquisition of Ethical Understanding It is almost impossible to have a universal definition of what ethics is, the only way to really observe it is in practise; how does ethics shape our lives and how is it acquired. Ethics applies to both us and the people around us and so is both politically important and important to the individual. Plato and Aristotle had contrasting opinions on both what ethics is, how it is useful and who can obtain it....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato's Allegory of the Cave - It's Importance in Today's World

- Plato's Allegory of the Cave - It's Importance in Today's World Our society so values education that sociologists have recognized the problem of "over-education" (Hadjicostandi). Many people are spending years pursuing degrees which they simply do not need for the jobs they perform. It is therefore prudent for students to question whether pursuing a liberal education is really as important as our society believes. What is the point of a college education. Does it have any purpose beyond its material benefits....   [tags: Philosophy]

Research Papers
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The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues

- The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues ABSTRACT: When contemplating the origins of philosophical paideia one is tempted to think of Socrates, perhaps because we feel that Socrates has been a philosophical educator to us all. But it is Plato and his literary genius that we have to thank as his dialogues preserve not just Socratic philosophy, but also the Socratic educational experience. Educators would do well to better understand Plato's pedagogical objectives in the Socratic dialogues so that we may appreciate and utilize them in our own educational endeavors, and so that we may adapt the Socratic experience to new interactive educational technologies....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays]

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Comparing the Views of Plato and Abraham Lincoln on the Civil War

- Comparing the Views of Plato and Abraham Lincoln on the Civil War Lincoln believed that a system of government divided among itself was doomed for collapse; "a house divided cannot stand." This philosophy earliest roots are evident in Plato's masterpiece, The Republic. Socrates states that perfection, which he refers to as justice, in a governed body is harmony among all classes of people-"The rebellious part is by nature the whole of vice."1 In order for the United States to survive as a nation, the government had to remain Federal....   [tags: Comparison Compare Conatrast Essays]

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Comparing the Role of the Noble Lie in the Iliad and the Republic

- The Role of the Noble Lie in the Iliad and the Republic Lie – 2 : something that misleads or deceives Noble – 5 : possessing, characterized by, or arising from superiority of mind or character or of ideals or morals (Merriam-Webster Dictionary) The very thought of a noble lie is contradictory, yet Plato uses it as the basis for stability within his perfect republic. The concept that a lie so deeply ingrained in society will allow it to remain peaceful is generally thought to be unique to Plato....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]

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Comparing Plato, James Madison, and John Mills

- Comparing Plato, James Madison, and John Mills Plato, James Madison, and John Mills are all supporters of the idea that opinion must be discussed in public debate. In my own reason-based thought this idea that through silence ignorance grows louder is my own general understanding. In Plato's The Republic he discuses the idea that there is first knowledge at the first degree. In the second degree there is opinion which is neither proven to be true or false. In the last degree is falsehood. He argues that opinion is not pure knowledge and therefore can not be pure truth....   [tags: Papers]

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Platos The Republic Books 6 Through 10

- Plato’s The Republic Books 6 through 10 In books 6 through 10 of Plato’s Republic, we see many different discussions on the subject of justice, philosophy, and goodness. The philosopher Socrates has now defined what a philosopher is. His next task is to show that a philosopher is best qualified to be the ruler of a state. A good ruler must surely know what Justice and Goodness are, for he must administer Justice and always act for the good of the community. But a philosopher, as we have seen, has knowledge of the Forms, so from this point of view at least, he is best qualified to be a ruler....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato's Response to Thrasymachus' Immoralist View of Justice

- Plato's Response to Thrasymachus' Immoralist View of Justice In Book 1 of the ‘Republic’, Socrates, in answer to the question ‘What is Justice?’ is presented with a real and dangerous alternative to what he thinks to be the truth about Justice. Julia Annas believes Thrasymachus thinks Justice and Injustice do have a real existence that is independent of human institutions; and that Thrasymachus makes a decided commitment to Injustice. She calls this view ‘Immoralism’: “the immoralist holds that there is an important question about justice, to be answered by showing that injustice is better.” This essay identifies this ‘Immoral’ view before understanding if and how Plato can respond to i...   [tags: Papers]

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Theory of Ideas

- Plato is one of the most important people in the history of Philosophy. Throughout his life, he had made many contributions to the world of philosophy, but the most important contribution that he is most known for is his theory of the Ideas or Forms. Throughout his many works such as the Phaedo and Symposium, he presented his theory of Ideas by using both mythos and logos in his argument for support. In the Phaedo, Plato introduced the theory of Ideas which centered on the problem of immortality of the soul, which suggested that true cannot be finding in the sensible world, but in the world of ideas....   [tags: Plato, Philosophy, Rhetoric]

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Pluto´s Ideals from the Republic

- Plato’s ideals Arguably, in the history of ideas, Plato has planted the strongest and deepest seeds to the mind of humans and we have been pondering and trying to exercise them ever since. His “theory of forms” will be discussed, and somewhat hesitantly dismissed, in the context as he writes in the works of “The Republic”, because his theory is sound the same way math equations are sound and lead to undisputable answers, but problematic in how it can be proved and to whom it actually benefits will always vary....   [tags: forms, ideas, knowledge, experiment]

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Two Kinds of Metaphysics

- Philosophy Midterm Paper “Two Kinds of Metaphysics” Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with revealing the theoretical nature of being and the world that envelops it. The word “metaphysics” derives itself from the two Greek words μετά (metá) which means beyond, and the word φυσικά (physiká) meaning physics. This branch of philosophy began when ancient philosophers questioned what was beyond physics, concepts such as being, knowing, cause, time, substance, and space where questioned....   [tags: Theoretical Nature, Philosophy, Plato, Aristotle]

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Morality and Politics

- Morality and politics have always been closely linked; even in present day politics, morality often has a part to play. Morality within politics has always been a controversial and highly debated topic by many leading political thinkers. There have been many key thinkers on the subject; however, Plato and Augustine have both an interesting and highly debated view on the argument of whether politics should be focused on morality. Both Plato and Augustine had differing views on the ideas of politics and the role that morality plays within this....   [tags: History, Philosophy, Plato, St. Augustine]

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Difference Between a Democracy and a Republic

- There is a fundamental difference between a democracy and a republic as it concerned the political entitlement of the citizenry. The citizens of a republic do not participate directly with governmental affairs. The citizens of a republic can however have a say in who does participate. The Roman republic has two prefect systems to prevent dictatorship which didn’t work. The Romans called their political system not democracy but republic. Republic is something that belongs to the people. In Rome the right to take part in the governing belonged only to the men and those who had the statute of being citizens....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Runaway Statues: Platonic Lessons on the Limits of an Analogy

- Runaway Statues: Platonic Lessons on the Limits of an Analogy ABSTRACT: Plato’s best-known distinction between knowledge and opinion occurs in the Meno. The distinction rests on an analogy that compares the acquisition and retention of knowledge to the acquisition and retention of valuable material goods. But Plato saw the limitations of the analogy and took pains to warn against learning the wrong lessons from it. In this paper, I will revisit this familiar analogy with a view to seeing how Plato both uses and distances himself from it....   [tags: Philosophy Plato Analogy Essays]

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Socratic Citizenship as Salve to the Antinomy of Rules and Values

- Socratic Citizenship as Salve to the Antinomy of Rules and Values It is not inconceivable that Plato would view the enforcement of rigid laws as a “noble lie” (Rep112)—noble as a guarantor of order in a just city, but misleading in its pretense of infallibility. The Crito, the Apology, and the Republic capture the tension in Plato’s work between a commitment to substantive justice and to formalist legal justice. In a system of substantive justice, rules are flexible and act as “maxims of efficiency” (Unger 90), proxies of justice and virtue....   [tags: Plato Philosophy Philosophical Essays]

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