Your search returned over 400 essays for "New England"
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The Growth Of The New England

- ... For example, unlike the South, where women had strong property rights, women in New England were required to give all their property to their husband upon marriage. Additionally, many laws enforcing the integrity of marriage was established. Divorce was generally unpermitted, and separated coupled were often forced to reunite by the authorities. Overall, the longevity of the New England colonists led to the development of large stable families. The New England society was extremely tightly knit....   [tags: Slavery, Thirteen Colonies, New England]

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The New England, Middle, And Southern Colonies

- ... Ten years later the Puritans came to New England for religious reasons as well. The climate and geography dictated the lives of the New England settlers. The rocky soil and cold winters enabled its residents to specialize in fishing, shipbuilding, and manufacturing metal goods. Middle colonies are Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York and New Jersey. Middle colonies and American colonies consisted .also the settlement was non-English Europeans Dutch and German. Middle colonies good farmland, timber also import natural resource .the Middle settlements had slightly warmer weather with soil more effective....   [tags: Thirteen Colonies, New England Colonies]

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New England and Chesapeake Bay Colonies

- By 1700, differences in religious convictions, wealth, and climate transformed the New England and Chesapeake Bay colonies into distinct societies with markedly contrasting cultures and values. Having fled England because of religious persecution, the Puritans placed a greater emphasis on religion. In contrast, the Chesapeake society, consisting mostly of men who were affected by the primogeniture laws, placed more importance on wealth and land. The climates of the two societies fostered distinct economies and new cultural practices, such as the tobacco wives in the Chesapeake region....   [tags: chesapeake society, new england, puritans]

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Applying the Kotter Eight Step Change Model to New England Wire and Cable

- Companies are not unlike species, they must both change with the current environment or risk becoming extinct. Charles Darwin succinctly states this idea, “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent but the one most responsive to change.”1 In the case study, “Other People’s Money,” in the scene presented there is a proxy vote going to take place by the shareholders of the New England Wire and Cable (NWC) Company. But, before the votes are casted both the Chairman of the Board and patriarch Andrew "Jorgy" Jorgenson and the potential majority shareholder Lawrence "Larry the Liquidator" Garfield are afforded the opportunity to deliver speeches to the body of...   [tags: New England Wire and Cable]

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The Middle Colonies Of New England Over Living During The Chesapeake Bay

- After reviewing the differences, I believe I would choose life in the middle colonies of New England over living in the Chesapeake Bay. New England colonists were more focused on family and their security. Versus the Chesapeake who preferred to be individuals and work and live on their own. Both areas have their pros and cons but New England’s lifestyle was the better choice because of the low life expectancy rates the Chesapeake had, also from their way of living and fight for survival. Life in New England was centered on the family unit....   [tags: Marriage, Family, Puritan, New England]

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Use of Allegories in A New England Nun

- Use of Allegories in A New England Nun    In "A New England Nun", Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife.          This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and that of her little yellow canary....   [tags: New England Nun Essays]

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Changes Throughout The Land : Indians, Colonists, And The Ecology Of New England

- The book Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England by William Cronon tends to generally explain how and why changes took place within the New England communities, affecting plants, animals and the people of its community and, and how these changes seemed to inter affect each other, all due to changes from an Indian to an European style of dominance. This seemed to show overall that the ecological system could be affected by changes the people within it may make. Which tends to bring Cronon’s thesis to light being the shift from Indian to European influence in New England was due to vital changes that constituted the way its people seemed to organize and reorg...   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, New England]

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A Fever in Salem: A New Interpretation of the New England Witch Trials

- The author of this book has proposed an intriguing hypothesis regarding the seventeenth-century witchcraft trials in Salem, Massachusetts. Laurie Winn Carlson argues that accusations of witchcraft were linked to an epidemic of encephalitis and that it was a specific form of this disease, encephalitis lethargica, that accounts for the symptoms suffered by the afflicted, those who accused their neighbors of bewitching them. Though this interpretation of the Salem episode is fascinating, the book itself is extremely problematic, fraught with historical errors, inconsistencies, contradictions, conjecture, and a very selective use of the evidence....   [tags: New England Witch Trials]

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Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and Hope Leslie

- Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and Hope Leslie - Opening Doors for Women Limited opportunities for women to share their opinions publicly throughout the Nineteenth century caused an abundance of females to communicate their ideas through writing. Catharine Maria Sedgwick was among the first of American authors to publish historical and other fiction. Much of her work deals with the role of white women in society, especially involving the Cult of Domesticity or True Womanhood....   [tags: New England Tale Essays]

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Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale

- Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale In her article “‘But is it any good?’: Evaluating Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction,” Susan Harris provides methods and criteria for examining Women’s Fiction in what she calls “process analysis” (45). To apply Harris’ guidelines to Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale, I must first “acknowledge the ideological basis of [my] endeavor” (45) as a feminist/equalitist critique of the text. Furthermore, I identify the three-fold approach that Harris describes as historical, in distinguishing early nineteenth-century from mid- to late-century attitudes, rhetorical, in labeling Sedgwick’s communicat...   [tags: New England Tale Essays]

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Life Alone in Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's A New England Nun

- Life Alone in Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's A New England Nun It is hard to imagine a life in American society without first picturing marriage in a church, white picket fences, and babies. Life alone for those who turn from marriage and children can be seen as a promise of loneliness. Yet choosing not to get married or to have children does not mean unhappiness. In the words of Anne Morrow Lindbergh: “There is a quality to being alone that is incredibly precious. Life rushes back into the void, richer, more vivid, fuller than before” (qtd....   [tags: Mary wilkins freeman New England Nun Essays]

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The Chesapeake And New England Colonies

- ... As a result of their economic focus they had a very low key religious tone (Murrin 88). This tolerance for religion provided an ample ground for the establishment of the Anglican Church in the late 17th century, going in a direction that the New England colonies rejected. Religion did not only affect the social structure of New England, it also played a large role in their government as well. The aforementioned covenant with God could only be achieved through a strict upholding of religious law, and as a result the New England colonies formed their towns around religious figures, deeply penetrating their legal and judicial system....   [tags: Slavery, Thirteen Colonies, Indentured servant]

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New England and Chesapeake Colonization

- During the 1600’s the New England and Chesapeake regions were beginning to settle and colonize. While both came from English origin and had dreams of wealth and freedom, differences began to form just as they settled and by the 1700s the two regions will have evolved into two distinct societies. Because of the exposure to different circumstances both regions developed issues that were unique from one another and caused them to construct their societies differently. Therefore, the differences socially, politically and economically in the two regions caused the divergence....   [tags: Differences, Challenges, Independence]

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Puritan Influence On New England

- ... They Puritans were able to make like their government and church appear as separate, but in reality the church and government was intertwined, which lead to the church manipulating their way to sustain power. Therefore, The Puritans were not tolerant of any other religion as Nathanial Ward says in 1647 in The Simple Cobble of Aggawam, “He that is willing to tolerate any religion, or discrepant way of religion, besides his own, unless it be in matters merely indifferent, either doubts of his own or is not sincere in it.” The Puritans were also not tolerant of anyone who accepted other religions, an example of whom was Roger Williams....   [tags: Puritan, Massachusetts, Christianity, Puritanism]

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A Description Of New England

- John Smith, Jay Gatsby and Willy Loman all spend their lives trying for something extraordinary. Gatsby and Loman seek to fulfill the very dream which brought John Smith to America, the American dream. A dream in which one comes to American and preserves themselves and " may quickly grow rich" (Descriptions of New England). However, all fail to realize that the American Dream would not be a dream if all could achieve it, and more importantly that a dream by its very nature is not real . In John Smith’s “A description of New England “ he writes about, In his writing he says that “May quickly grow rich” in the new world....   [tags: The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby]

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The New England And America

- ... Paul Ford said many claimed The New England Primer of 1777 as a “Classics in Education.” To believe that a religious creed dominated the educative systems in both the United States and Great Britain proves that the validity of both curriculums was based on religious principles. Colonialism helps explain why United States and Great Britain share many similarities with the Primer. Essentially, when students from either the UK or the US trained with this religious tool, both would learn that letter “N” reads, “N o a h did view the old world & new” (Austin Pg....   [tags: Education, United States, Religion, United Kingdom]

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Racial Tensions in New England

- Historical fiction, generally, exposes readers to a historic event through a new lens—often from a first-person perspective. The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, by M.T. Anderson, does a remarkable job illustrating a unique, though fictional, perspective of the revolution in New England through the eyes of an experiment: Octavian Nothing. While written with an adolescent audience in mind, Octavian Nothing offers great insight to the transitional period between racial attitudes in American society for all readers....   [tags: Racism]

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Analyzing The New England Patriots

- ... Another method is to become an equipment manager, or even be a field manager which gets the stadium ready for the games. There is a definite hierarchy in football. The one with the most power would be the owner of the team, from there you have the general managers, and then it comes to the players. There is a deferent hierarchy for the players as the veterans have more authority over the rookie players. After the players you have the equipment managers who help get all the footballs, pads, and helmets ready for practice or games....   [tags: National Football League, American football]

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New England Patriots : 10-1

- ... In addition to that his ability to scramble in the pocket, evade pass rushers, and extend plays is something only a few other quarterbacks posses. Combine that with the prolific Panthers’ defense and you got yourself an outstanding NFL team. At 11-0 with a favorable remaining schedule, an undefeated season seems to be well in the grasp of the Panthers’ claws. 4. Cincinnati Bengals: 9-2 (4) After two straight losses, the Bengals bounced back in a big way, defeating the St. Louis Rams 31-7. The defense held Todd Gurley to a mere 19 yards on nine carries and intercepted Nick Foles three times....   [tags: National Football League, American football]

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The Chesapeake Colonies and New England Colonies

- In 1419, Prince Henry the Navigator of Portugal began the period of time known as the “Age of Exploration”. Europe’s leading superpowers, France, Spain, Portugal, Holland, and England, all competed for colonization in unknown territories. Samuel de Champlain colonized along the St. Lawrence River in 1608, Henry Hudson of Holland established Albany in 1609, and Spain established colonies in Mexico and Mesoamerica. In 1607, England established its first colony in North America around the Chesapeake Bay, and nearly a decade later established a second colony in present-day New England....   [tags: Colonial America, Differences]

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The Virginia Colony And Puritan New England

- ... In Puritan society, God dominated the ideas of the citizens at virtually every moment of their life. According to John Winthrop, he envisioned the Massachusetts Bay colony to be a “City Upon a Hill”. When Winthrop said this, he was trying to say that the colony would serve as a model to others around the world of what a great city should be and the idea that God would have a central role in everyday life. In Puritan New England, the farmers were mainly focused on yeoman farming, in which they only farm enough crop to support their own family and leave some for sale....   [tags: Puritan, Massachusetts, Massachusetts Bay Colony]

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The Accusation of Witches in Puritan, New England

- The American weakness in times of trouble is the instinctive act of finding a scapegoat. Stemming from the Calvinistic religious beliefs of the Puritans who immigrated to America, anything that strays from the predestined lives of these puritanical people is the result of sin. The ideas of "original sin" and "predestination" are at the heart of Calvinism. Thus, the Calvinist Puritans have their lives planned out for them by God before birth and anything that disrupts that plan must be eradicated....   [tags: Salem Witch Trials, Witch Hunt]

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Comparing The Settlement Of New England And Chesapeake

- ... Much of the growth of the American colonies came from religious groups. There were many problems between catholics and protestants, such as when Lord Baltimore ( business owner) adopted a policy of religious toleration, but this policy considerably favored Catholics. As more and more people began to flow into the new world, many colonists began to shape into what religion, and what they wanted to be. Population increase, also created problems involving jobs, and even individuality. Many more colonists began to form colonies, due to the more and more immigration of people....   [tags: American Revolution]

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New England Colony And Southern Colony

- ... The Sothern Colony natural resources consisted of fertile farm land, rivers, harbors, slaves, fish, corn, tobacco, grain, fruit, and livestock. Plantations in the Southern Colonies grew cotton, tobacco, indigo and other crops. On large Southern Plantations, slaves toiled in groups of about twenty to twenty five under the supervision of overseer, men were hired to watch over and instruct the work of slaves. Enslaved workers were obligated to work for fifteen hours a day at the peak of the harvest season....   [tags: United States, Puritan, Thirteen Colonies]

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Catherine Sedgwick's A New England Tale

- Catherine Sedgwick’s A New England Tale is the story of Jane a young woman who is cast into a family where she is looked down upon, but through her trial and tribulations remains strong in her faith in God. Jonathan Edwards’ sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God focuses on those who lose faith and overlook the power of God’s hand, and by doing so will be sent to hell to repent their sins. Throughout the novel by Sedgwick and the sermon by Edwards it is the importance of moving forwards in life while staying faithful and true to God without sin remains the focus of the pieces....   [tags: God, Sinners, Analysis]

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Catherine Sedgwick's A New England Tale

- Catherine Sedgwick’s A New England Tale is the story of Jane a young woman who is cast into a family where she is looked down upon, but through her trial and tribulations remains strong in her faith in God. Jonathan Edwards’ sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God focuses on those who lose faith and overlook the power of God’s hand, and by doing so will be sent to hell to repent their sins. Throughout the novel by Sedgwick and the sermon by Edwards it is the importance of moving forwards in life while staying faithful and true to God without sin remains the focus of the pieces....   [tags: Sin, God, Novel Analysis]

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Child-rearing in Puritan New England

- 1. Using the primary sources in chapter 2, child-rearing in Puritan New England was described as the responsibility of Puritan parents. By introducing their children to the importance of education, Puritan parents agreed that child-rearing is a methods that will help ensure their children’s spiritual welfare (Hollitz, 22). The two main goals Puritans taught their children are reading and writing. It is a system they believed that will properly mold their offspring. Parents also taught basic beliefs of religion and principles of government to their children (Hollitz, 22)....   [tags: Child Care, Child Development, Social Issues]

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Differences in the Development of New England and the Chesapeake Region

- Differences in the Development of New England and the Chesapeake Region Question: Although New England and the Chesapeake region were both settled largely by people of English origin, by 1700 the regions had evolved into two distinct societies. Why did this difference in development occur. By the 1700s the two regions, New England and Chesapeake varied greatly in spite of being from the same mother country, England. Physical and cultural differences separated these two regions distinctively. While religion moulded the daily life in New England, Money and tobacco farming dominated the Chesapeake....   [tags: English History England Settlement Essays]

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CASE: Paul Cronan and New England Telephone Company (A)

- CASE: Paul Cronan and New England Telephone Company (A) I.     LEGAL CASE ANALYSIS A.     Facts Paul Cronan was hired by New England Telephone (NET) in 1973 as a file clerk. In 1983 he was promoted to service technician. He worked in Needham, Massachusetts for 18 months before transferring to South Boston, Massachusetts. In 1985, Cronan suffered from medical symptoms due to AIDS-related complex (ARC), and missed work sporadically for 6 months. In June, 1985 Cronan requested a third leave of absence from work for a doctor’s appointment....   [tags: Legal Legality Case England Essays]

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The Trip To The New England Colonies

- My trip started off with the 30 day voyage across the mighty Atlantic. Not knowing that I would be sent to the well established colony of Jamestown. I would be staying with the average family. They are to let me stay on account of rent from my publisher in England. My renter, a well developed man. He runs a silversmith shop. He is also an artist. I am sure he will show me pieces of his work. His wife, a very friendly lady from the reports. She is half Indian. They have 2 sons. Both well built and are very courteous....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Imagery and Exceptionalism in New England

- Imagery and Exceptionalism in New England Jonas Clarke, the minister of the Congregational church in Lexington, Massachusetts, entertained guests at his home the evening of April 18, 1775. The two guests that Clarke hosted were seeking a safe haven from British authorities. His guests, Samuel Adams and John Hancock, discussed strategy with Clarke concerning the conflict with Britain as they attempted to keep their location secret from the British. Supposedly, Great Britain planned to capture these two radicals in hopes of terminating the colonial resistance....   [tags: American History Essays]

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Stone Walls Of New England

- Introduction Stonewalls of New England are rich with history and archeologists are still trying to determine who may have built the first stonewalls or if our concept of when North America was first settled is wrong. Items of stone and metal lead archeologists to believe that the archaic period is when the Northern New England portion of America was first inhabited. There have been many different types of fences built in New England, natural debris, wood, and stone included. Stemming from these different fence types American ingenuity flourished and inventions arose....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Chesapeake And New England Colonies

- A community is a group of people who work together towards a common goal and share a common interest. Lack of such a quality can and most likely will cause a struggling town or city to fall into the extremes of poverty and wealth. The New England community was so strong and so supportive in comparison to that of the Chesapeake Bay, that it is no wonder they developed into two distinctly different cultures before the year 1700. The Chesapeake region developed into a land of plantations and money-driven owners, with the elite wealthy, almost no middle class, and those in poverty creating the population....   [tags: US History Colonies Compare Contrast]

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Native Peoples in New England

- Native American history spans tens of thousands of thousands of years and two continents. It is a multifaceted story of dynamic cultures that in turn spawned intricate economic relationships and complex political alliances. Through it all, the relationship of First Peoples to the land has remained a central theme. Though Native Americans of the region today known as New England share similar languages and cultures, known as Eastern Algonquian, they are not one political or social group. Rather, they comprised and still comprise many sub-groups....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Irish Population in New England

- There are more Irish people in New England than there is in Ireland. Irish people didn't just appear one day in the United States, though. Most of them emigrated here from Ireland over 55 years ago. Four in five people you meet in New England are at least one-eighth part Irish. It is easy to tell that when the Irish people came here, they didn't come in small groups. Ireland is a beautiful country in Europe, about the size of Maine. Today, Ireland is mostly populated with middle-class families....   [tags: American Culture]

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Comparing and Contrasting the New England and Southern Settlements

- The New England and the Southern colonial settlements were united in several areas that created the opportunity for each group of colonies to grow. However, these groups of colonies took divergent paths when it came to the founders’ motives to settle the New World, the importance of religious and social orientation, economic approaches and political developments. These different approaches were ultimately successful beyond the early founders’ expectations. Both the New England and Southern colonies enjoyed some common conditions that enabled them to grow....   [tags: religion, politics, motivation]

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The Chesapeak and the New England Area Become One

- ... They did not invest largely in staple plantings, rather than, relied on artisan-industries like carpentry, shipbuilding, and publishing. The Chesapeake and New England attracted distinct kinds of settlers and, by 1700, the community’s differed tremendously. In New England, the community was nearly solely English and white. Devoutly devout families, encompassing Puritans, Quakers, and Catholics made up a large percentage of the community. In the Chesapeake, however, the community was a majority black-slaves with the boom in the tobacco commerce plantation proprietors relied on the labor slaves provided....   [tags: colonies, anglican, society]

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Settlers and Differences in the New England and Chesapeake Region of the US

- DBQ Second Draft In the early 17th Century, great quantities of people emigrated from Great Britain to begin their individual lives again in the New World. These people, once in the New World, trans-located across the eastern side of the United State, and by the 18th century, despite their English ties had formed into two distinctly large communities mainly the New England and Chesapeake regions. Although the New England and Chesapeake regions were both greatly inhabited by people of English origin, the two groups varied in their political views, geographic locations and social beliefs; but, most importantly, the two regions varied in their religious emphasis and economic motives, which sig...   [tags: Puritans, Pilgrims, Religion]

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Differences Between the Early Settlements of New England and the South

- The early colonies of America were all settled with the thoughts of a better life, but different settlers had varying aspirations which led to the first colonies having notable differences amongst them. The northern settlements of New England were more heavily influenced with the idea of freedom from The Church of England while the immigrants who settled in the south were more monetarily influenced. Both settlements desired to come to America for a sense of freedom, whether it be from the church or to tap new resources and establish a proprietary gain....   [tags: American History]

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The Unjust System of New England Puritan Court System

- ... (S G) I doe not hurt them. I scorn it. (H) Who doe you imploy then to doe it. (S G) No creature but I am falsely accused” (Linder umck.edu). This shows a trait in Hawthorne's prosecution style where he always started his examination with assume guilt, as opposed to innocence. He also seemed to be on the accuser’s side (Salem Witch Trials 1). In Puritan New England, judicial and normal practices were centered around religion. Laws were extreme and often would relate to religion. Many examples of this are present in the Massachusetts Body of Liberties which was a set of laws that governed New England....   [tags: religion, punishment, cruel]

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Making The New England Aquarium Accessible To Minority Communities

- The New England Aquarium had a difficult dilemma. The organization wanted to become an entity representative of the city of Boston and characterize its ethnic, racial, and economic diversity. However, since the late 1960's, the aquarium was considered inaccessible by minority communities. As such, its board of trustees wanted to change this image. In the early 1990's, they developed a plan to "attract and involve" populations previously underrepresented. At the same time, the education department began to implement programs targeting minority youth....   [tags: Business Management]

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Reaction From Western New England University

- WESTERN NEW ENGLAND UNIVERSITY SPRINGFIELD, MA BME 206 Biomedical Engineering Sophomore Laboratory Spring 2015 Nina Konyreva Reaction Times I. Introduction & Background The experiment, entitled “Reaction Times,” prompted one to investigate the response periods of human subjects under multiple conditions. The reaction times were measured through various harmless visual and sound cues, such as an unpredictable, random, erratic visual cue, a visual cue with a declared warning, a predictable, anticipated cue, a visual cue while getting distracted, and finally, an auditory cue....   [tags: Arithmetic mean, Mean, Reflexes]

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Smallpox in New England

- Smallpox in New England The original New England Natives first felt the effects of Smallpox and other diseases during the first decade of the sixteenth century. This was shortly after John Cabot explored the coast in 1498. By 1504, constant fishing trips were being made by the French and Portuguese, which started the spread of disease. However, It wasn’t until the outbreak of 1616 and 1617, when huge numbers of natives were killed. Diseases like chicken Pox, cholera, the plague, tuberculosis, and many others were introduced to New England for the first time....   [tags: Colonial Diseases Native Americans Essays]

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New England Vs Chesapeake

- New England Vs Chesapeake Early English colonies in America hardly resembled the union of men and women that would later fight against England and build a new country. In fact, until the mid-eighteenth century, most English colonists had very little, if anything to do with the settlers in neighboring colonies. They heard news of Indian wars and other noteworthy events, not from the colony itself, but from England. The colonies in the New World appeared completely different and the prospect of any unity between them seemed impossible....   [tags: essays papers]

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DBQ on Differences Between New England and Chesapeake Area

- Two unique societies were constructed by people of common origin. These English colonists immigrated to the New World for either economic prosperity or religious freedom. During colonization, two regions were formed, New England and the Chesapeake Bay area. The two contrasting societies of New England and Chesapeake region were the results of diversity of: social and family structure; health and living conditions; economy; religion and beliefs; and government policies. As stated in Document A, unity was encouraged among New Englanders, which developed into close societies....   [tags: English Colonists in the New World]

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Puritans in New England

- Puritans in New England Raised during the aftermath of the fall of the Spanish Armada to England, the Puritan generation they were children and grandchildren of the Protestant Reformation in Europe. An idealistic generation of the Colonial Cycle, the Puritans came to America seeking freedom, to practice religion in a manner different than that of the English. Puritans regarded New England as a place to establish a "visible" kingdom of God, a society where outward conduct would be according to God's laws....   [tags: Papers]

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New England Patriarca Mafia

- Organized crime in the United States keeps the FBI and other law enforcement agencies in a never-ending investigation of criminals suspected of the infiltration of legitimate businesses. A notorious twentieth century organized group was the New England Patriarca Mafia, or N.E.P.M.. Originating in 1915, the N.E.P.M. evolved over the early twentieth century decades, until 1954 when Raymond Loredo Salvatore Patriarca was donned as boss* and promptly began to expand its power. Due to mafia-related language that will be present throughout the paper, a page of definitions is supplied at the end of the paper....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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A New England Nun

- Mary Wilkins Freeman was born, raised and spent the majority of her life in Puritan rural New England. This scene had a huge impact on her writing. Most of her novels and short stories had the ability to depict that lifestyle perfectly. One of the best examples of this is her story “A New England Nun.” (Fiction) The main characters in this story are Louisa Ellis and Joe Dagget. Other important characters are Caesar, the dog, and Lily Dyer. Louisa is described as very dainty, precise, and methodical....   [tags: Mary Wilkins Freeman]

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How the New England Colonists Altered the New England Environment

- How the New England Colonists Altered the New England Environment In Changes in the Land, William Cronon points out the European colonists` pursuits of a capitalistic market and the impact it had on the New England ecosystem. Native Americans and colonists had different views on the use of land resources. The Natives viewed the land as something not owned, but as a resource to sustain life. They believe in a hunting-gathering system, hunting only when necessary. In the long run Native Americans lost their old traditions and were forced to adapt to the colonists` traditions in order to survive....   [tags: Papers]

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New England Weather

- In the New England area, the weather is very unpredictable due to the following reasons. New England sits right in the middle of the Jet Stream, a weather pattern that remains fairly consistent as it guides the weather for the entire United States. To the north of the Jet Stream, you have very cold Arctic air, and to the south of it, you have the warm moist Gulf air. These two factors help to create a very unstable atmosphere that can change the forecast of the weather at anytime. Many New England states lie along bodies of water....   [tags: essays research papers]

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New England Colonies

- New England Colonies Motivation • By and large, the people who settled in the New England Colonies wanted to keep their family unit together and practice their own religion. • They were used to doing many things themselves and not depending on other people for much. • Some of these people came to New England to make money, but they were not the majority. Economy • The New England Colonies were largely farming and fishing communities. • The people made their own clothes and shoes. • They grew much of their own food....   [tags: American History]

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New England colonies

- The people who settled in the New England Colonies were the Separatist Puritans called Pilgrims and the New Englanders would come to prosper through their hard work, thrift, and the quality of their commitment to God and each other. The settlement pattern in New England Colonies during 1600 to first half of 1700 was designed in clustered housing and small agricultural fields. The king will give out land and the settlement set up will include a meeting house, a village commons, large open lots which is very large and it contains kitchens and places where animals are kept and agricultural highland....   [tags: essays research papers]

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New England Nun

- Q: New England Nun: Louisa’s Final Decision vs Individualism Theme Louisa faced a tough decision when Joe Dagget returns home because it seems like whatever love she had for him before he left has faded and now she views her wedding as more of a chore. If she is going to marry someone, it shouldn’t be because of a decision made many years ago, it should be made because she truly loves that person and is willing to spend her whole life with him. In order for her to marry Joe, she would need to devote her whole life and way of living to suit him and his needs....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Chesapeake and New England Colonies: A Comparison

- The Chesapeake and New England Colonies: A Comparison During the late 16th century and into the 17th century, European nations rapidly colonized the newly discovered Americas. England in particular sent out numerous groups to the eastern coast of North America to two regions. These two regions were known as the Chesapeake and the New England areas. Later, in the late 1700's, these two areas would bond to become one nation. Yet from the very beginnings, both had very separate and unique identities....   [tags: American America History]

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Societies in The New England and Chesapeake Regions

- After the discovery of the New World by Christopher Columbus in 1492, the powerful Old World scrambled to colonize it. The three major nations involved in this were Spain, France, and England. Spain took more to the south in the Central American and Mexico areas while France went north in the Canada region. The English came to America and settled in both the New England and Chesapeake area. Although the people in these regions originated from the same area, the regions as a whole evolved into different societies because of the settlers’ purpose for coming to America and the obstacles faced in both nature and with the natives....   [tags: AP US History Advanced Placement]

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Europeans in Pursuit of Capitalism in New England

- Europeans in Pursuit of Capitalism in New England Indian and European people had many cultural differences causing both cultures to clash. The two cultures also had different beliefs in terms of land usage and commodities. The European arrival had an enormous impact on the ecosystem, which as well affected the lives of the Indians. The Indians were used to being mobile in terms of their way of living as opposed to the European colonists, they were used to settling in one place and were also very materialistic....   [tags: Papers]

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Comparing the New England and Chesapeake Regions

- Comparing the New England and Chesapeake Regions The New England colonies were formed by Protestants who were escaping England. They ‘planned’ their society. When they came over they brought entire families, not just random people. The Chesapeake region colonies were formed by whoever signed up. The reasons that resulted in the differences between the New England and the Chesapeake colonies were political, social, and economic. The political reasons for the differences were that in New England there was a basic plan....   [tags: American History Compare Contrast]

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Comparing the New England and Chesapeake Colonists

- Comparing the New England and Chesapeake Colonists The New England and Chesapeake colonists settled in the new world for different reasons like religious freedoms in the North and quick profits in the South. Jamestown was originally an ideal place to strike it rich for the colonists. They didn't plan on staying long, therefore not bringing many women, as seen in Doc C. The early colony began to expand after the governors imposed laws and kept things running smooth. The Pilgrims who were seeking religious freedom from the Church of England established the Plymouth plantation in Massachusetts....   [tags: essays papers]

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Chesapeake Vs the New England Colonies

- During the late 16th century and into the 17th century two colonies emerged from England. The two colonies were called the Chesapeake and New England colonies. Even though the two areas were govern by the English, the colonies had similarities as well as differences. The Chesapeake and New England colonies grew into obviously distinct establishments. Difference in colonial motivation, religious, political structures, socio-economic, and race relation, were responsible for molding the territories....   [tags: American History]

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Diversity Programs at the New England Aquarium

- In the case of “Diversity Programs at the New England Aquarium”, all four frames – structural, human resources, political, and symbolic— show a different perspective of the underlying management issues surrounding the New England Aquarium. The issues that surround the structural frame are based around the aquarium’s goals and mission, as well as the actual organizational structure and coordination. The human resource frame will be used to view the relationships and balance between the needs of the organization and the needs of the people involved at the aquarium....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Colonial New England and Religious Tolerance

- Colonial New England and Religious Tolerance Throughout the seventeen hundreds, thousands of immigrants came to the New England region, seeking refuge from European persecution. These early colonist yearned for a domicile were they could indulge in religious freedom, a heavy contrast to the strict religious persecution they experienced in their native countries. Aspirations such as these hold the initial sentence in the statement: “The New England colonies were founded upon the promise of religious freedom,” to be valid....   [tags: Papers]

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Chesapeake And New England Colony Dbq

- Chesapeake and New England Colony DBQ The Crusades of the middle ages introduced much innovative and formerly unheard of merchandise into Western Europe; however the scarcity of these luxury goods instilled Europeans with drive to find easier access to the Far East. Although desired "Northwest Passage" never was found, joint-stock companies, like the Virginia Company of London, settled colonies in the New World for untapped resources such as silver and other tradable goods. Many more corporations followed suit, settling mainly in the Chesapeake Bay area, their small settlements eventually developing into the Chesapeake colonies....   [tags: American History]

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Case Study On New England Fisheries

- Abstract The 1800’s the George’s Banks off the coast of New England was very generous to the fisherman who fished the sea for a living. There was a balance between what the fisherman took and what the sea could provide. By the mid-1900 that balances began greatly to shift. Technology developed during the 1950s allowed fishermen to take in much more fish than previous years. Through continued over fishing and lack of controls in place at the time, the fish stock depleted to the point the George’s Banks could no longer support the fisherman....   [tags: Business Case Study, solution]

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Symbolism in "a New England Nun"

- Symbolism in "A New England Nun" The main character, Louisa Ellis, lived a life which paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and her yellow canary. The animals and Louisa are trapped by their captivity, and because they have lived like this for so long, no longer crave freedom. Both Louisa and Caesar live solemn and isolated lives. This is shown when Freeman describes Caesars house as "half hidden among the tall grasses and flowers" (258). Given the setting of where Louisa lives, she is fairly isolated as well....   [tags: American Literature]

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Witchcraft Hysteria in Puritan New England

- Witchcraft Hysteria in Puritan New England In 1692, the problems following Massachusetts’s change from Puritan Utopia to royal colony had an unusual increase in the witchcraft hysteria at Salem Village (now the town of Danvers). Although the belief in witchcraft had started a huge problem in Salem, almost 300 New Englanders (mostly lower class, middle-aged, marginal women – spinsters or widows) had been accused as witches, and more than thirty had been hanged. With this issue in Salem all superiority in its scope and intensity....   [tags: American America History]

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New England Vs. Chesapeake DBQ

- New England vs. Chesapeake While both the people of the New England region and of the Chesapeake region descended from the same English origin, by 1700 both regions had traveled in two diverse directions. Since both of these groups were beset with issues that were unique to their regions and due to their exposure to different circumstances, each was forced to rethink and reconstruct their societies. As a result, the differences in the motivation, geography, and government in the New England and Chesapeake regions caused great divergence in the development of each....   [tags: American History]

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Chesapeake Vs. New England Colonies

- Today, the United States of America is a very racially and religiously diverse society. We saw the seeds of diversity being sown in the early days of colonization when the Chesapeake and New England colonies grew into distinctive societies. Even though both regions were primarily English, they had similarities as well as striking differences. The differentiating characteristics among the Chesapeake and New England colonies developed due to geography, religion, and motives for colonial expansion....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Jamestown Vs. New England Colony

- Jamestown and the Massachusetts Bay Colony had many similarities and differences. Many of these differences were due to their physical location and climatic conditions. The success of both colonies can be contributed to strong leadership and the characteristics of the personalities of the settlers that inhabited each settlement. Many of the early problems in both settlements can be contributed to a lack of knowledge on the parts of the settlers along with attacks from neighboring Native American tribes....   [tags: American History]

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Comparing Colonial Virginia and Colonial New England's Effect on American Character

- I believe colonial New England had more of an effect on the American character than Virginia for several reasons. First they promoted more of the values that have transcended into modern day America such as religious toleration, their educational ideas and their focus on the importance of family. And we shouldn’t forget the fact that the American Revolution began in New England so in essence the America we know today would not exist without New England. First off, colonial New England was more family based, as I believe America is today....   [tags: american history]

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Social, Economic and Political Differences Between the New England and Chesapeake Colonies

- During colonial times, European nations quickly colonized the New World years after Columbus’ so called discovery. England in particular sent out a number of groups to the east coast of the New World to two regions. These areas were the New England and the Chesapeake regions. Later in the late 1700s, these two regions would go though many conflicts to come together as one nation. Yet, way before that would occur; these two areas developed into two distinct societies. These differences affected the colonies socially, economically, and politically....   [tags: American History]

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The Two Regions which were Colonized: The Chesapeake Region and the New England Region

- When the English settled into the New World, they were split up into two sections, the Chesapeake region and the New England region. Although the English settled both, the two regions were severely different from each other when they were brought about. The New England and Chesapeake colonies differed in three ways: their reason for venturing over, economy, and population. These major differences were what shaped our nation today and what will continue shaping our nation in the future. When the Mayflower sailed over to the New World, on the boats were Puritans that were looking for a change in the way that their religion was practiced where the Chesapeake settlers came over for gold....   [tags: American Colonies, Colonial America]

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The Differences Which the Regions of New England and Chesapeake Developed in the United States

- Although the New England and Chesapeake regions of the United States were both settled by the English in the 1600s, they developed into two very different communities based mainly on their geographical location and religious devotion. Unlike their European rivals, the English founded colonies in North America. Settlers in the Chesapeake region used force to take possession of Indian lands. The Chesapeake region of the colonies included Virginia, Maryland, the New Jerseys and Pennsylvania. In 1607, Jamestown (the first English colony in the New World) was founded by a group of settlers along the James River....   [tags: American Colonies, American History]

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Ecological Change in New England under Native Americans and Colonists

- Although the colonial history of New England has been thoroughly researched and taught across all levels of educational institutes across the United States, the study of its environmental history often takes a backseat to America’s complex and enthralling social and political history. This trend has been abating in recent decades, given that more Americans have taken an interest in their environment and conservation, and in response to this new demand the field of environmental history was initiated by historians like William Cronon, who explores the changes in the New England environment under the stewardship of Native Americans and European colonist in Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonis...   [tags: Ecology]

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The Mysterious Mountains Underneath the Sea: The Wonders of New England Seamounts

- The Mysterious Mountains Underneath the Sea: The Wonders of New England Seamounts Introduction Seamounts are one of the most pervasive landforms in the world, and can be seen in various frequencies throughout ocean basins. Seamounts are remnants of volcanoes and can be described as underwater mountains that can take various shapes and sizes. Islands and seamounts are similar in the way they are formed but they are different because seamounts do not reach the oceans surface. The pacific basin—mainly the pacific tectonic plate—contains half the seamounts that can be seen in satellite altimetry datasets....   [tags: volcanoes, underwater mountains]

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The Impact of the New England Puritans and the Chesapeake Catholics on the Development of Colonial Society

- Many times throughout history, a specific individual or a group comes along and shapes a society. Religious groups often arrive and settle on a new piece of land, and happen to shape that society, around their beliefs and religion. The New England Puritans and the Chesapeake Catholics are prime examples to show how religion shaped the development of a colonial society. In 1624, the early 17th century, the religious group called the Puritans, settled for the first time in the New England territory....   [tags: American Colonies, ]

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Contrasting William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation and John Smith's A Description of New England

- Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford and A Description of New England by John Smith are essentially irrelevant to one another in the way that each piece has a very different point of view. The author John Smith was a pilgrim who arrived in the Americas and wrote a description of the new land. William Bradford was also a pilgrim who arrived at Plymouth and wrote more about the realities of his personal journey. The purpose of this essay is to contrast the purposes of the writers, their intended audiences, and how each writer gives out a specific feeling....   [tags: American history, compare/contrast]

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The Effect of the Salem Witch Trials on Puritanism

- The Salem witch trials had a drastic affect on the Puritan religion. The trials helped shape and point the direction for the New England Colonies and the Puritan religion. The Salem witch trials outbreak began in 1692. In the past, there had only been about five convictions of people being accused of witchcraft; none of this resulted in any deaths(Wilborn 16). Usually just a fine was given, but by the end of 1692 there was already 150 arrests (17). Whether you were rich or poor, it didn’t seem to matter, anyone and everyone was being accused....   [tags: redirected New England Colonies]

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Calvinism: A Look Into Domestic Life in Catherine Sedgwick's Novel, A New England Tale

- Catharine Sedgwick’s novel, A New-England Tale, tells the story of an orphan, Jane Elton, who “fights to preserve her honesty and her dignity in a household where religion is much talked about but little practiced” (Back Cover). The story take place in the 1820s, a time when many children were suffering in silence due to the fact that there was really no way to get people to understand exactly how bad things were for them. The only way anyone could ever really get a true understanding of the lives of the children in these households would be by knowing what took place in their homes....   [tags: orphan, religion, reverence]

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Comparing the Settlers of Jamestown, Virginia and the Pilgrims Settlers in New England

- There were vast differences between the difficulties experienced by the first settlers of Jamestown, Virginia and the Pilgrims who settled in New England in more ways than one. While the Pilgrims fled Europe because of religious persecution, the Jamestown colony was established solely as a business venture. While life was difficult for both groups of settlers upon reaching the new world, the Jamestown venture was doomed to fail from the beginning; but where the Jamestown settlers failed, the Pilgrims succeeded....   [tags: Jamestown vs Pilgrims]

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1315 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

The Nephew's Italian American Restaurant Is the Place for You

- ... You will be greeted by some of the friendliest hostesses around, if not by one of the owners, husband and wife Ron and Sandy Stapleton themselves. You’ll feel as if you’ve all been friends forever by the easy smiles and conversation as you’re shown to your table. If you’re a town resident, seeing that this is a hometown place, frequented by many locals, you just might run into quite a few old friends before you make it to your table. You can choose to be seated on the bar side which is the smaller side and includes the smooth wooden bar surrounded by about fifteen high backed bar stools and a few booths and tables scattered sparsely....   [tags: new england, food, family]

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