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Native American Spiritual Beliefs

- I have decided to discuss the topic of Spirituality in Native Americans. To address this topic, I will first discuss what knowledge I have gained about Native Americans. Then I will discuss how this knowledge will inform my practice with Native Americans. To conclude, I will talk about ethical issues, and dilemmas that a Social Worker might face working with Native American people. In approaching this topic, I first realized that I need to look up some general information about Native Americans in the United States....   [tags: Native American]

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Native American Stereotypes in the Media

- Native Americans have been living on American soil for quite a while now. They were here before the European colonists. They have been here and still continue to be present in the United States. However, the way the media represents Native Americans disallows the truth about Native Americans to be told. Only misinterpretations of Native Americans seem to prosper in the media. It appears the caricature of Native Americans remains the same as first seen from the first settler’s eyes: savage-like people....   [tags: misinterpretation of Native American history]

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Native American Mascots Are Racist

- Teams in every sport, at every level of competition, have a mascot. It is the mascot that represents the competitive spirit and team identity, motivating players and fans alike. Does the symbol chosen have any impact on whether a team wins or loses. Unlikely. But the choice of a Native American mascot continues to ignite debate and controversy among athletes, fans and alumni, as well as those people who might otherwise be disinterested in sports. Utilizing an Indian mascot is nothing more than a veiled attempt at hate speech....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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Native American Cruelty

- For many years Native American removal has caused a lot of pain and suffering for many Indians in America. How we have treated Native Americans in the past is an embarrassment to our history. Removing Native Americans from their land when we first settled here was wrong because we caused them a lot of hardships, took something from them that wasn’t ours to take, and in the end we all the pain and suffering we caused them was really for nothing. People still believe today that taking away their land was the right thing to do because they think that we were technically the first people to settle here so it was rightfully ours to take....   [tags: Native American]

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Native American Cultures, Tribes, and Religion

- Even though there are numerous Native American tribes and cultures, they all are mostly derivatives of other tribes. For instance, in the southwest there are large number of Pueblo and Apache people including, the Acoma Pueblo tribe, Apache Chiricahua, Jemez Pueblo, and Apache Western. In this section, largely populated groups in certain regions (northwest, southwest, The Great Plains, northeast, and southeast) religious ideas, practices, and impact on American culture will be discussed. First, the northwestern region, which includes the areas from: the northwestern coast from Oregon to Washington, the Rocky Mountains, and the Cascades Mountains consist of mainly Paiute, Shoshone, and Blackf...   [tags: Native American Studies]

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Native American Flutes

- Although Native Americans are known for their voice being a vital instrument, most rituals, songs, and dances are accompanied by an assortment of instruments such as, drums, rattles, flutes. Every instrument has it is own meaning and a purpose. In this section, the significance of these instruments as well as their structure and functionality is explored. The drums are a vital aspect to the Native American culture; they understand the drum to be more than an instrument. In a web article written by Elisa Throp entitled, “The importance of drums to Native American culture”, Elisa says, “It is a Voice....   [tags: Native American Culture]

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Native American Religion

- When Europeans first set foot upon the shores of what is now the United States they brought with them a social structure which was fundamentally based around their concept and understanding of Western European Christianity. That the indigenous peoples might already have a thriving civilization, including religious beliefs and practices, that closely paralleled the beliefs and practices of European civilization, was a concept not considered by these early explorers and settlers. This European lack of cultural understanding created tensions, between Native Americans and Europeans, and later between Native Americans and Euro-Americans, that eventually erupted into open warfare and resulted in g...   [tags: Native American Culture]

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Native American Sports

- Native Americans are known for many different qualities they had as a part of their lifestyle. The games and sports they created to play that are now used in today’s society, lacrosse being the most famous. Some of the games played in the early times are either drastically changed or no longer played. There are many different Native American tribes that factor out cultural differences and depending on the tribe, the lifestyle qualities such as sports, games, and rituals differentiate between one another....   [tags: native american history, athletics]

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The Debate Regarding the Use of Native American Mascots

- Teams in every sport, at every level of competition, have a mascot. It is the mascot that represents the competitive spirit and team identity, motivating players and fans alike. Does the symbol chosen as a mascot have any impact on whether a team wins or loses. Unlikely. But the choice of a Native American mascot continues to ignite debate and controversy among athletes, fans and alumni, as well as those people who might otherwise be disinterested in sports. Why all the controversy. The dispute over whether Native American mascots should be used as a team symbol dates back to the 1970’s (Price 2)....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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Use of Native American Mascots Should be Banned

- In his Sports Illustrated article, “The Indian Wars,” S.L. Price argues that there is no easy answer to whether or not the use of Native American mascots by high school, college, and professional sports teams is offensive. “It's an argument that, because it mixes mere sports with the sensitivities of a people who were nearly exterminated, seems both trivial and profound -- and it's further complicated by the fact that for three out of four Native Americans, even a nickname such as Redskins, which many whites consider racist, isn't objectionable.” Whereas Price provides ample evidence that his claim is true, I disagree with the way it was presented and I still insist that Native American nam...   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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The Jesuit Missionaries and Disease in Native American Society

- There is data to suggest that around the beginning of the 16th Century, there were approximately 18 million Native Americans living in North America. By 1900 the population of the Indigenous peoples had declined to about 250,000. The common belief has been that this rapid decrease in population has been due to the disease that Europeans brought with them when they migrated to the “new world”. Historian Alfred W. Crosby writes that “it is highly probable that the greatest killer was epidemic disease, especially as manifested in virgin soil epidemics.” Many reports and essays focus on disease as the main killer of the Indigenous population, but few often look at how the European and Indigenou...   [tags: Native American History ]

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Native American’s, Stereotypes, Discrimination, and Ethnocentrism

- Many races are unjustly victimized, but Native American cultures are more misunderstood and degraded than any other race. College and high school mascots sometimes depict images of Native Americans and have names loosely based on Native American descent, but these are often not based on actual Native American history, so instead of honoring Native Americans, they are being ridiculed. According to the article Warriors Survive Attack, by Cathy Murillo (2009) some “members of the Carpentaria community defended Native American mascot icons as honoring Chumash tradition and the spirit of American Indian Warriors in U.S....   [tags: Native American Culture]

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The Impact of the Indian Removal Act on Eastern Native American Tribes

- The United States expanded rapidly in the years immediately prior to and during the Jackson Presidency as settlers of European descent began to move west of their traditional territories. White settlers were highly interested in gaining Native American land and urged the federal government to allow them to obtain it. President Andrew Jackson encouraged Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act in 1830, which gave the federal government the authority to move consenting eastern Native American tribes west of the Mississippi River....   [tags: Native American History ]

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Kennewick Man and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA)

- Kennewick Man is one of the most complete ancient skeletons found to date. The discovery initiated scholarly and public debate of the legal and ethical implications of anthropological study of Native American human remains. The Kennewick Man controversy has called into question the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA)’s ability to balance tribal, museum, and archaeological interest in ancient human remains. Kennewick Man was found on July 28, 1996 below Lake Wallula, a section of the Columbia River, in Washington....   [tags: Native American Studies]

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Use of Native American Mascots is NOT Racist

- Issue of whether to keep Mascots in schools or not, started in late 1970’s and from then this debate is going on. Most of the schools have Indian Mascots in place for half a century and suddenly it become problem to use Indian Mascots. Over 500 Native American organizations also announced their support for the removal of those mascots and over 1200 schools across the United States have changed the name of their sports teams and some school refused to play with those schools using Indian mascots....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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Native American Mascots Should be Banned

- The sun beat down upon the pale skin of the crowd as a consistent murmur echoed across the field. Hands simultaneously lifted and then dropped, repeatedly, while every eye gazed with intent upon the figure who stood alone on the grass in the center of the field. He had a glowing red face, an oversized nose, and a red and white feather that pointed to the sky. As the chant continued to resonate, the figure began to dance to the soft harmony of an organ. His nose humorously bounced up and down while the stupid grin on his face never seemed to dissipate....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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Native American Repartition

- Tensions between science and religion have recurred throughout history. The issues of what to do with the remains of our ancestors are viewed differently by people. Some people believe that the burial site should be left untouched. Among this group of people fall the Native Americans. Archaeologists, on the other hand, think we should uncover the burial site to be able to discover more about the history of the land from which the grave lies. The Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act was signed into law on November 1990 by President George Bush....   [tags: Native American History]

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Native American Literature

- Native American Literature Spending this semester reading Native American Literature, really brought me to make comparisons to my past experience. I think in each story, there was always something significant that seemed similar to my life. There were stories that had similar connections, and as I read them, I put my mind to connect what the author was saying and to what I remember from my life and make a connection. Actually, I thought every story was good and well to understand. For the most part, the story that really brought my attention and that made a connected to my life was reading Indian Education by Sherman Alexie....   [tags: Native American Literature]

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Use of Racist Native American Mascots in Professional Sports

- I awaited the day before the big game in nervous apprehension. Would the Red Sox be able to rebound from a 0-2 series deficit and advance to face the Yankees. They had already won two straight games and evened the series at 2-2. The next game would be the do or die situation. I stylishly dressed in all of my Red Sox apparel (even the lucky red socks) and prepared for an invigorating game. Mike from the third floor came down to the first floor lounge to watch the big game. Being from Cleveland, Mike was sporting all of his Indians apparel....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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Use of Native American Mascots Should be Banned

-      What is considered offensive. Is it considered offensive to use obscenities around children. According to many people in the United States, it is sport team names and mascots that depict a certain group of people are considered offensive. People around the United States are trying to get professional sport teams to change their names and mascots because they feel it depicts their certain race in bad way. Teams should have to change their mascot and their name if they are named after a certain group of people....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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Sports Mascots Honor the Native American Indian

-      The year is 1991.  The Atlanta Braves had just completed their first trip to the Fall Classic in four decades, and the Washington Redskins were undefeated, well on their way to their third Super Bowl title.  All across the eastern seaboard, sports fans were tasting success - while American Indians were in an uproar.  This year witnessed the peak of the protests over the use of mascots with American Indian themes.  With two of the major professional sports teams in question making front-page news across the country, many of us heard American Indians' complaints for the first time.  Suddenly, thanks to the cries of thousands of demonstrators, the names of many Americans' favorite...   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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The Native American And Native Americans

- ... In order for the people in the tribe to maintain order; chiefdom was introduced (the highest person in authority, position, or rank who obtained their rank through merit rather than birth); there were two chiefs who were mainly in charge of keeping order and their tribes safe. First the paramount chief, he conducted trade maintained peace through the colonists and their leaders. Next was the subordinate chief, he held authority and control of one another, and could be compared to guards. Each tribe often consisted of chiefdoms....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American And Native Americans

- Over the past century, many Native American groups have experienced social and environmental change and have had to deal with a variety of contemporary issues. Although Native Americans may be associated with the past due to popular culture, many different American Indian groups are strongly affected by modern issues. For instance, while type II diabetes is a major issue in many communities, it disproportionately affects Native Americans. Beginning in the 20th century, Native American groups have been affected by diabetes, and they are currently one of the populations that are at particularly high risk for developing the disease....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American And Native Americans

- Considering historical evidence, the notion: Native –Americans was not the first inhabitant of America is a complete false. For centuries, history kept accurate and vivid accounts of the first set of people who domiciled the western hemisphere. Judging by those records, below are the first set of Native-American people who inhabited America before the arrival of another human race; the Iroquois: The Iroquois of Native Americans was one of the tribes that lived in America before other people came....   [tags: Iroquois, Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American And Native Americans

- The Native Indians that lived in Tennessee lived a Stone Age lifestyle they online used tools and weapons made of stone, many had never seen a horse and no knowledge of the wheel. Many of the tribes in Tennessee included Catawba, Chickasaw, and the Yuchi tribes. The Native Americans residing in Tennessee their way of life based on the natural raw material available in the local area. The resources provided food, clothing, and houses for the Native Americans residing in Tennessee. Tennessee was named after Cherokee name “Tanasi” meaning “Little River”....   [tags: Cherokee, Native Americans in the United States]

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The Native American Experience as Portrayed Through the Essay Titled, Address, and the Painting Titled, Among the Sierra Nevada

- The Native Land Imagine living in a place where you feel free, and safe all of your life, and then one day it’s all taken away from you. Native Americans have always depended on the land to take care of them. Had the Great Spirit forsaken them. These are the thoughts that pondered the mind of Seattle as he answered to the Governor of Washington, in the essay titled “Address”. What was the purpose or message behind Albert Bierstadt’s painting titled “Among the Sierra Nevada”. How are these two separate works associated....   [tags: native american indians, american history, art]

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The Native American Native Americans

- The Native Americans For at least fifteen thousand years before the arrival of Christopher Columbus and Thomas Hariot, Native Americans had occupied the vastness of North America undisturbed by outside invaders (Shi 2015 pg. 9). Throughout the years leading up to Columbus’s voyage to the “New World” (the Americas) and Hariot’s journey across the sea, the Indians had encountered and adapted to many diverse continents; due to global warming, climatic and environmental diversity throughout the lands (2015)....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Culture : Native Americans

- Native American Culture Have You ever thought about the people who inhabited this land before it was stolen from them. Do you know who they were besides the false name they are given, the things they’ve accomplished and how they have helped us today. in this paper you will learn about the life and hardship the original Americans have endured for over 300 years. Native American way of life Many Native Americans lived like we do, providing food,clothes and homes for their families....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Emigration : Native Americans

- ... The pilgrims were amongst the first to arrive. These new settlers with the help of Natives were able to flourish. The introduction of corn and tobacco gave Europeans the leverage to trade for fur pelts, fish, and wild game also granting them free passageway among different regions of the new world. With the continuing expansion of Europeans, treaties were set to grant settlers right of way to explore new lands and colonize. Fearing this sudden expansion that spread like wildfire Native American’s began to migrate west avoiding American settlements....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The American And Native American Culture

- If you have been living in the Coastal Virginia area for any amount of time, you have heard the cheer of, “Hail to the Redskins.” Recently, controversy has been swirling over schools, universities, and professional sports with team names and mascots related to Native Americans heritage. Such team names as the Redskins, Seminoles, Braves, Indians, and Apaches are now facing criticism over team names and they represent the Native American culture. Differing world-views are apparent with the controversial use of Native American names and logos; however, each of the opposing views is a result of spate culture realities created by both history and tradition....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Indians And Native Americans

- Native Americans were known to be indigenous people because they were always settling in particular regions, so they were known as natives to the lands of America. Later on, Native Americans were known as American Indians. The Native Americans got their name from the first explorer of America, named Christopher Columbus. Christopher Columbus thought that he reached the Indies when he first came to America and so he decided to call the group native residents or “people of India” (Schaefer). Some of the Indian groups are The Cherokees, Navajos, Latin American Indians, Choctaw, Sioux, Chippewa, Apache, Blackfeet, Iroquois and Pueblo (Schaefer)....   [tags: Cherokee, Native Americans in the United States]

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Repression of the Native American Society

- Intro: Ever since the first white settlers arrived at America in 1492, the Native American population has been seen as a minority. People who weren’t as good as the new “white” settlers and unfit to live the new found land of America. As America expanded westward with the Louisiana Purchase and war with Mexico that ceded the south west to the U.S. as a result of the treaty of the 1803 Guadaplupe-Hildago Treaty, white settlers continued to move westward. They found rich fertile land, but there was a problem....   [tags: Native Americans]

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Native American And Alaskan Natives

- ... In 1969, the congress authorized an investigation on the education of Native American children. This report called “Indian Education: A National Challenge, A National Tragedy,”concluded that the system of schools applied in Native American communities was not being effective due to “the lack of Native American participation or control; coursework that rarely recognized Native American culture, language or traditions; and the anti-Indian attitudes of administrators and professors of the schools” (Kennedy Report 1969)....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Oppression Of Native American Americans

- Oppression of Native Americans Oppression of Native American tribes dates back to their first contact with Christopher Columbus in 1492 and continues to this very day. If the Europeans did not expose weapons, disease, and starvation I believe that the Native American race would be flourishing alongside Americans today. Today Native American unemployment rates are between 50 and 70%. Lack of formal education fuels other social problems like unemployment, poverty, teenage pregnancy, criminality and drug abuse and it forces the Native Americans to accept badly paid jobs causing 25% of Native Americans to live in poverty (Sarche)....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Mascots Of Native American Mascots

- Teams use Native American mascots in all sports, to represent their team’s pride, strength, and will to win. The role the mascot plays is an intimidation factor, as well as something to motivate the team. Mascots rarely fall under scrutiny, except for the mascots that represent Native American tribes, people or cultures. Many schools and teams use some sort of Native American reference as a mascot. Examples of Native American mascot range from names like the Indians, Chiefs, and Braves, which are some of the more generic ones, to Seminoles, Fighting Illini, and Chippewas to name some of the tribal based names....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Language Of Native American Storytelling

- ... Storytelling is also a powerful method of conveying a tribe’s symbiotic relationship with nature. The role of storyteller was highly revered in Native American culture. Storytellers were often given the honored title of “Hair Twister”, and were believed to have the ability to hear the heartbeat of Father Sky and Mother Earth. Although the stories from one tribe might greatly differ from another, Hair Twisters from every tribe focused on common themes such as the origin of all things, the general well-being of the community, individual responsibility, and honoring the environment....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American And The United States

- INTRODUCTION In 1831, the Supreme Court of the United States decided that the fact that the U.S. government had made treaties with various Native American nations in the past did not set precedent for treating said nations as independent, sovereign states. Despite the facts that the United States had made legal treaties with Native Americans numerous times and that U.S. law states that the United States can only make treaties with foreign nations, the Supreme Court decision in Cherokee Nation v....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Story Of The Native American People

- ... One possible solution for this situation would’ve been for the European colonists to simply leave the Indians alone, and allow them to continue living the way they always had. In the years leading up to the American Civil War, more than one hundred thousand white settlers moved into the land that was supposed to be left for the Indians. Many of these white people cheated and lied to the Indian people, and this made the Indians start to not trust the white people as a whole. A specific example of this in the text can be found in chapter three of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Of The Samish Tribe

- This paper is very important to me, as I am Native American of the Samish tribe, and I’m taking ethnic studies courses in a local college. When I learned about the atrocities committed against Native Americans in the past, it made me sad that nothing could be done about it. When I learned about ongoing nefarious activities against Native Americans, it made me determined to shed light on them to as many people as possible, as we have power to make a difference and to prevent further atrocities. America has continued to be so indifferent to minorities, especially the ones that we took this land from, and that is why I chose to pick this as my topic....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native Americans And Native American Religion

- ... In 1968, president Grant enacted a “Peace Policy” with missionaries responsible for spreading the branches of Christianity to the Native Americans as he determine the religion to be morally superior to the Native American religion. Accordingly, this meant Americans had “to dispossess Native peoples of their lands, take away freedoms, and send them to reservations, where missionaries would teach them how to farm, read and write, wear Euro-American clothing, and embrace Christianity” (“President Grant,” 2015)....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Religion]

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Native American Names And Mascots

- ... Suzan Shown Harjo, president of Morning Star Institute, a national Native American rights organization, says “The most offensive example of a mascot is the one used by Washington’s football team…. The R-word - she can’t even bring herself to say it - is the same as the N-word.” Harjo has been fighting for years to get the Redskins to change their name (Basu). The Washington Redskins aren’t the only team to scrutinize for their Native American nickname. College teams like Arkansas State University and University of North Dakota had to change their mascots....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Art And Culture

- The introduction of of European materials and techniques made Native American art more effortless create, and new techniques and mediums were used. However, in many cases European encounter caused Native American artwork to become less culturally significant, while a greater emphasis of its economical importance emerged. Traditional symbolism in many crafts were lost, as each unique tribe obtained the same European materials rather than what was native to the land they lived on, and sacred icons became novelties in the aristocratic homes of Europe....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American History And History

- The history of Native Americans is a fruitful one, spanning across to different continents for thousands of years. Their culture encompassed a variety of unique and important elements, blending these cultures with that of the European was a complicated prospect, one that in turn seemed to dissipate an accurate historical account. For instance, the Native Americans of the northeast or New England have been historically recorded as a single group, containing a societal and political cluster. History in some aspects has compromised the individualism of sub-groups, such as the Algonquian....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Reasons For Native American Removal

- Reasons Given for Native American Removal Throughout American history there are patterns of injustice, inequality, and cruelty. This thread began when the Europeans discovered their new world was already inhabited by others, the “Native Americans”. Although they both tried to live in peace with each other, the Europeans thirst for power and domination of the new land led to the unjust, and cruel removal of the “native” people from their home. This idea originated under the rule of President Jefferson, and his removal policy, which he believed was the, “only was to ensure the survival of the Indian culture” (Intro....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Museum Of Anthropology

- ... Although, Kroeber and the museum staff had a deep affection for Ishi, Ishi always remained, a museum specimen, an intellectual resource, a cultural relic, and an object of entertainment for scholars and citizens alike (K. Kroeber & C. Kroeber 2003). Ishi’s career as a museum specimen demonstrates how the sentiments, stories, and structures constructed by curators and museum staff work to produce stereotypes of Native Americans. Ishi was portrayed as a stone-age man in order to allow EuroAmericans to see their ‘prehistoric past’ and origins....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Women Of Native American Culture

- Women in Native American culture had a very prominent role in intercultural relationships; they held far more power and influence than their European counterparts. Europeans have long used treaties written and signed by men to govern how relationships, trade and land are developed. Indians have sought to develop kinship ties to to develop those same traits and since many Indian cultures are matrilineal, women maintain a high status. Women have been revered in Native American culture, perhaps this is most evident among the Cherokee Nation....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Cherokee]

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Native American Culture : Native America

- ... With the consolidation, large groupings of people in were in confined areas that spread diseases even more rapidly. This also altered the structure of the pueblo society. The pueblos had different lifestyle ways than the coastal or even Great Plains Indians. They lived in large, stationary adobe houses that were connected through doorways. Most had a kiva which was the center their religious ceremonies. These ceremonies focused on the keeping of balance between the spiritual and earthly worlds of Pueblo culture....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Effects Of Native American Culture On Native Americans

- In this essay I am going to write about health issues related to Native American. “Many thousands of years before Christopher Columbus’ ships arrived in the Bahamas, a different group of people discovered America: the nomadic ancestors of modern Native Americans who hiked over a “land bridge” from Asia to Alaska more than 12,000 years ago. In fact, by the time European adventurers arrived in the 15th century A.D., scholars estimate that more than 50 million people were already living in the Americas....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Youth

- Native American Youth The United States educational system faces a major challenge in addressing the disenfranchisement of youth due to poverty and racism in the schools. The U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 found that “currently about one-quarter of Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans are living in poverty in the U.S. compared to less than 10% of Asian Americans or Whites.” (Hughes et al. 2010, p. 2) Hughes, Newkirk & Stenhjem (2010) identified the stressors children living in poverty faced caused young adolescents to suffer mental and physical health issues which resulted in anxiety, hypertension, fear and depression....   [tags: Native Americans ]

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Native American Education

- Native American Education Through the years minority groups have long endured repression, poverty, and discrimination. A prime example of such a group is the Native Americans. They had their own land and fundamental way of life stripped from them almost unceasingly for decades. Although they were the real “natives” of the land, they were driven off by the government and coerced to assimilate to the white man’s way. Unfortunately, the persecution of the Natives was primarily based on the prevalent greed for money and power....   [tags: Native Americans]

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Native American Education

- Through the years minority groups have long endured repression, poverty, and discrimination. A prime example of such a group is the Native Americans. They had their own land and basic way of life stripped from them almost constantly for decades. Although they were the actual “natives” of the land, they were forced by the government to give it up and compelled to assimilate to the white man’s way. This past scarred the Native American’s preservation of culture as many were discouraged to speak the native language and dress in traditional clothing....   [tags: Native Americans]

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Native American Education

- The modern American society is best defined by its education. The “American dream” is founded on going to school, getting a good job, and becoming successful. Ironically, the actual native peoples of this country are actually the least likely to attain this dream. The largest obstacle they face is lack of proper education. The standard educational practices being used for the instruction of Native American peoples is not effective. There are many pieces to this road-block, and many solutions. This can be rectified by having more culturally aware teachers and parents, and by teaching the general population more about the Native American cultures....   [tags: Native Americans]

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Native American Voices

- Lesson 5 Short Answers Q1. Based on this chapter, in what ways does Eastman seem to distance himself from white culture and ally himself with Native American culture. In the midst of the Ghost Dancers uprising, Eastman declares that “it is [his] solemn duty to serve the United States Government” (718). Though he does not side with the “malcontents” (719), Eastman allies himself with the Native American people. Eastman refers to his fellow Native Americans as “my people” (717), identifying himself with them....   [tags: Native Americans]

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Native American Museum

- George Gustav Heye Center - The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian is a fascinating building at the Bowling Green area of Lower Manhattan. It’s close to Battery Park that displays an elegant view of the water. You can see ferries floating by headed towards Staten Island, since South Ferry Terminal is nearby. It allows you to appreciate the hidden gems of the city located in the outskirts Manhattan. One of those very treasures is the museum mentioned previously. The Museum of the American Indian is directly in front of the Bowling Green Park with a water fountain at the center....   [tags: Native Americans ]

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Native American Voices Know the Definition of Native American

- Many school children celebrate a cliché Thanksgiving tradition in class where they play Indians and Pilgrims, and some children engage in the play of Cowboys vs. Indians. It is known that some died when colonization occurred, that some fought the United States government, and that they can be boiled down to just another school mascot. This is what many people understand of the original inhabitants of America. Historical knowledge of these people has been shallow and stereotyped. The past 150 years has given birth to a literate people now able to record their past, present, and future....   [tags: American History, Oral Tradition]

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Native American History : The Trail Of Tears

- 1830 saw the instatement of the Indian Removal Act, a forced relocation of several Native American tribes. This spurred what is now known as the “Trail of Tears.” The Five Civilized Tribes, Choctaw, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Muscogee, and Seminole were forced to relocate after resisting assimilation with American civilization. Over 17,000 tribe members were removed and sent to what is now Oklahoma by the order of President Andrew Jackson. Despite the ruling of Chief Justice John Marshall, Jackson set in motion the Trail of Tears....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Mascots Should Not Be Banned

- The use of Native American mascots in colleges, universities, high schools, middle schools, elementary schools, sports teams, and groups in today’s society is a highly contentious topic. While some may argue that Native American themed mascots are harmless and non-offensive, others feel that they are unequivocally racist and offensive to the Native American culture and people. It has been proven that racist portrayals of Native Americans are regarded as being acceptable in most schools; while racist portrayals of other ethnic groups are never an acceptable behaviour....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Peoples And The English Settlers

- The Native American peoples and the English settlers viewed each other differently, and these different interpretations shaped their perspectives on each other’s way of living. The English viewed Native Americans as a lesser because they did not abide to their religion. The differences that separated them were things such as religion, lifestyles, and political structure. Because of their cultural differences, the gender roles varied in each settlement. Also, since Native American’s viewed the English settlers as a source of trade and way of improving social status within their tribe, once their relationship with the settlers became violent the natives could not sustain a normal way of living...   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Culture : The United States

- ... They may struggle for personal and cultural survival from the dominant culture to keep their identity alive. A way to relate to these students would be to not assume that your policies, procedures, and instructional strategies are understood and valued. Sending frequent communications home that invite questions, reactions, and suggestions will create a positive relationship. By allowing those in the classroom to have time to talk and discuss the importance of their perspective and culture will create a welcoming environment....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Cultural Significance Of Native American Art

- The introduction of of European materials, tools, and techniques transformed Native American art aesthetically as well as it’s role within Native culture. European technology produced goods that made Native American art easier to create and allowed Native American art to become more elaborate and detailed.  However, the distinctive styles of each unique tribes’ art was diluted as the tribes obtained the same European materials rather than what was native to the land they lived on. in many cases European encounter caused Native American artwork to become less culturally significant; For instance, many crafts that held religious ceremonial roles, or served spiritual symbolism, became available...   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Dna Controversy At Steak

- ... In the analysis of the book, I will discuss my uneasiness with the scientific data intervening and implicating the life of indigenous people by introducing their “blood quantum” (p64), a practice which does not allow the enrollment of certain Native Americans (p99), since they cannot meet the criteria of a certain percentage of the blood quantum. One of the reasons is because some individuals of these tribes may contain too many tribal lineages. The scientists are truly struggling to overcome the quest of genetic makeup, causing a heated debate amongst people, like I, who wishes for science to be more open to challenge new ideas....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Cheyenne Tribe Of Native American Indians

- The Cheyenne Tribe of native american indians are one of the most well known tribes in the plains. Originally in the 1600’s the Cheyenne Tribe lived in stationary villages in the east part of the country. They would rely on farming to make money and to feed their family. The Cheyennes occupied what is now Minnesota. In the 1700’s the Cheyennes migrated to North Dakota and settled on a river. The river provides a source of fresh water and many animals would go there so hunting would be easier.In 1780 a group of indians called the “Ojibwas” forced them out and they crossed the Missouri River and followed the buffalo herd on horseback....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Challenges Faced By Native American Tribes

- There are a number of challenges, faced by Native American tribes around the end of the twentieth century, which require an examination. Phillip Martin discussed the economic problems that the Choctaw faced in "Philip Martin (Choctaw) Discusses the Challenges of Economic Development, 1988." He stated, "For many years the Choctaw people were at the bottom of the economic and social ladders, practically all of them subsisting as sharecroppers" (p. 487). Sharecroppers were extremely poor, hardly more than slaves in many situations....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Sherman Alexie and Native American Writing

- Sherman Alexie began his literary career writing poetry and short stories, being recognized for his examination of the Native American (Hunter 1). Written after reading media coverage of an actual execution in the state of Washington, Sherman Alexie’s poem Capital Punishment tells the story of an Indian man on death row waiting for his execution. The poem is told in the third person by the cook preparing the last meal as he recalls the many final meals he has prepared over the years. In addition to the Indian currently awaiting his death, the cook speaks of a black man who was electrocuted and lived to tell about it, only to be sent back to the chair an hour later to be killed again....   [tags: Native Americans, Author, Poet]

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Racism Toward Native American Youth

- ... On the other hand, Native Americans did not become United States citizens until 1924 after the Indian Citizenship Act was passed. After Native Americans became citizens this caused the everyday American to feel indifferent of the situation, so they felt it was okay to have a Native American as the mascot of a team. People may say that the mascots were created to honor the Native American community for all that they have gone through. However, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) reports, “the use of American Indian-based names , mascots and logos in sports have a negative psychological effect on the Native peoples”(5)....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Civil Rights Movement

- “The fight to preserve tribal sovereignty and treaty rights has long been at the forefront of the Native American civil rights movement. The federal government has special trust obligations to protect tribal lands and resources, protect tribal rights to self-government, and provide services necessary for tribal survival and advancement” (The Leadership Conference). I find the idea of tribal sovereignty to be interesting considering all that native American peoples have been through when having to deal with the federal government....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Mascot Controversy Essay

- ... Not only that, but fans are now campaigning to remove the Cleveland Indians Chief Wahoo, leaving behind a symbolic silhouette in its place (Wulf). While these organizations are making progress for agreeable terms, there are those who believe it stands to represent something, and is no concern to anyone who opposes. The biggest controversy on this subject is that of the Washington Redskins. The owner of this NFL team, Daniel Snyder, has no intention of changing the name, nor working with Native Americans to diminish offence....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Issues in Today's Society

- What if everyday in America there was not an action someone could take because someone of an opposite race sexually assaulted or domestically abused that person. Often news outlets only focus on major even in cities or towns, but never the reservations. With the lack of awareness of the number of rapes and domestic abuse victims on reservations, at large society is saying America doesn’t care due to reservations having sovereignty. Even with new laws signed into place by President Obama to deal with the rape and abuse problems to Native American women, that come from non Native Americans, the problem with this is it’s a pilot only on three tribes (Culp-Ressler,1).It is said it will expand s...   [tags: native americans, domestic abuse, tribes]

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Native American And Native Americans

- In Chapter 1, we see that in 1492, three very different peoples—Native American, European, and African—met in the New World. In time, these three would form a new people—Americans. Discuss the similarities and differences between these three peoples in that time period. The primary similarities amongst these very different cultures, was two would face off against the Europeans. The Native Americans as well as the Africans established unique languages, domestic connections, community bonds, song and dance customs....   [tags: United States, United States Constitution]

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Native Americans And American Indians

- As stated in the research questions the Native American are referred to and their involvement in the western plains. Native Americans and American Indians will be used into changeably throughout this work. In order to demonstrate the view that has been portrayed of them in this myth of the dangerous frontier, and to disprove their overarching place in the myth. The Jackson Turner commentary furthers the myth that Native Americans were the epicentre of the fears of the Frontier. The ideas of Frederick Jackson Turner in the later nineteenth century can be compared with the modern perceptions of borderlands encouraged by Patricia Nelson Limerick and Pekka Hamalianen, for example....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Medicine and Spiritual Healing

- Throughout time, mankind has persistently been seeking ways to maintain their health and to cure those that had not been so fortunate in that task. Just about everything has been experimented with as a cure for some type of illness; whether physical, spiritual or mental. There has always been evidence of spiritual healing and it will continue to be an important part of any healing process, large or small. In particular the roots of Native American Medicine men (often a woman in some cultures) may be traced back to ancient times referred to as Shaman....   [tags: spiritual healing, medicine, Native Americans, Sha]

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Native American Folklore As Mythology

- Throughout history, and all over the world, mythology has been developed as a way of explaining the unknown and coping with one’s existence. Why does the sun shine. Well, seemingly, to generations past, something is controlling the universe, so there must be a god in charge of the sun and many other natural phenomenon. During the creation of Native American myths, “there was much in the way of free-range food, but hunting wasn't as easy as getting up in the morning, taking a stroll and shooting a few passing bison with your bow” (Godchecker)....   [tags: us history, american history]

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Assimilation of Native American Education

- Assimilation of Native American Education During my research in the assimilation of Native American Education, it was both interesting and alarming to learn of how the Americans assimilated the Native Americans into their White society. The focus of my paper is on how the assimilation of Native Americans was carried out in relation to their education and culture change. As well as, listing and describing certain types of schools created by the government to attain this. It is necessary to include how a typical day in the life of a Native American was spent; therefore, I have included a brief description of a day....   [tags: inclusion in the American public education system]

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Historical Challenges That Native American Women Have Faced

- Martha Garcia and Paula Gunn Allen both write in their essays of the challenges that Native American women have historically faced and continue to confront to this day. Major contributors to these challenges are the stereotypes and misconceptions by white male anthropologists and missionaries who studied the Native American tribes and found the women subservient and passive. Both of these authors strongly disagree in this characterization of Native American women and instead portray them as important and honored members of their tribes who will struggle but will continue to have a tremendous impact on the future of their tribes....   [tags: Native Americans]

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The Systematic Destruction of the Native American Nations in the 1830's

- In the 1830’s, the American government decided to relocate the Native American peoples to territories west of the Mississippi. The government came up with many reasons that the Native Americans had to move. Those tribes that did not move voluntarily were forcefully relocated from their ancestral lands. This forced move would later be known as The Trail of Tears. The American government came up with many reasons that the Native American peoples needed to move west of the Mississippi. Many Easterners felt that the move would protect Native American culture.1 Many Indians tried to assimilate into the white culture in order to stay on their ancestral lands.2 But the settlers did not like the I...   [tags: Native Americans]

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Integrating Holistic Modalities into Native American Alcohol Treatment

- Alcoholism is identified by severe dependence or addiction and cumulative patterns of characteristic behaviors. An alcoholic’s frequent intoxication is obvious and destructive; interfering with the ability to socialize and work. These behavior patterns may lead to loss of work and relationships (Merck, 1999). Strong evidence suggests that alcoholism runs in families (Schuckit, 2009). According to a study published by Schuckit (1999) monozygotic twins were at a significantly higher risk of alcoholism if one twin was an alcoholic....   [tags: Native Americans ]

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1289 words | (3.7 pages) | Preview

Life For American Women And Native American Woman

- “Approximately 18% of women entered the work force in the early 1900s” (Interesting Facts). Life for American women and Native American women during this time saw several changes. There were many differences and similarities between their lives. The book Waterlily tells about the life of a Native American woman, through the eyes of the main character, Waterlily. In the early 1900’s, although there was an outbreak of many diseases and consequently, an abundance of hardships, many women worked, thrived, and were influential in their jobs....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The American Of The Native Americans

- ... The Native Americans set up camp in these places, exiled from the fruitful lands that were always their homes. The Indian Removal Act promoted physical, as well as emotional and spiritual exile for the Native Americans. In their culture, their land and the nature surrounding them is very sacred. So when they are unrightfully removed from their holy lands, it becomes a source of unrest in many facets of the Native American’s life. Some scholars, such as Saddik Gohar, believe this exile is related to the exile of Palestinians from Israel for many reasons....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Native American

- ... It is used to communicate with the spirit world and is also used as a medicine. Native American religions and Christianity are far from the same. Even though they do consist of many great differences there are some similarities. Both believe in one creator although the name of that creator is different between the two. The Natives call this creator “Master Spirit” where the Christians call it God. The two also believe in an after life. The Natives though believe that the afterlife is becoming a spirit of the animal....   [tags: religion, church, life ]

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Native American Mascots : Native Americans And A Glimpse Of Century Old Racism

- Native Americans and a glimpse of century old racism Since 1970, over 2,000 high schools and colleges have dropped their Native American-themed mascots (Lowe). Mascots that stereotype a certain race or minority in any way is almost always racist and offensive. Indian mascots do not only lower self-respect for native American adults and children but completely disrespect their culture and religion. Just like the imagery of slavery or poor Irish immigrants, Indian mascots not only paint a portrait of twenty-first-century racism but is also a constant reminder of the most oppressed minority in the United States of America....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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