Your search returned over 400 essays for "Margret"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

The Motherly Decisions of Margret Blackwell

- It was a cold winter night and an expected mother is sleeping on a mattress that is lying on the floor. The room has brown paint on the walls and the plaster is breaking. Lying next to the woman is a box on the box is a bottle of beer and a gram of coke. The woman is addicted to cocaine and an alcoholic. You can hear the rats chewing in the walls. There are so many holes in the walls it looks almost like someone came in with a gun and shot up the walls. Margret wakes feeling so wet nothing can describe how much pain she is in....   [tags: mothers, Margret Blackwell,]

Strong Essays
1370 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid 's Tale By Margret Atwood

- ... As Gilead reorganized their city to an Old Testament-inspired society, they referred all authoritative figures with some form of religious term attached to their title. For example The commander of the faithful were the high-ranking officials, the guardians of faith were the police force, the angels were the army, and the eyes were the secret police who watched over the citizens of Gilead. They are the eyes of God watching their every move. Gilead also had a classification for the women, the Wives, Econowives and Unwomen, however, the two who referred to the bible were the Martha’s and the Handmaids....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Bible]

Better Essays
1202 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

The Diviners by by Margret Laurence

- As we continue with our life journey, we find the past typically integrates with the present. In the novel "The Diviners" by Margret Laurence, the protagonist, Morag, ventures through her journey of self-discovery. Throughout her pilgrimage, Morag's conflicts with herself and society as a whole bring out the fundamental principle of her character: her perseverance. Although there were other external factors that had an effect, Morag's unconquerable will was built primarily by her experiences in her childhood, adulthood, and ancestral past....   [tags: morag, childhood experiences]

Better Essays
641 words | (1.8 pages) | Preview

Dr. Margret Jean Watson

- Nursing theorist Dr. Margret Jean Watson grew up in Welch, West Virginia where she was the youngest out of eight children (Marriner-Tomey & Alligood, 2006). Once she graduated high school she married Douglas Watson and then moved to Colorado (Marriner-Tomey & Alligood, 2006). Once she moved her and her husband had two daughters one named Julie and the other named Jennifer. Between her two daughters Dr. Watson has five grandchildren (Marriner-Tomey & Alligood, 2006). Even after Mr. Watson’s death in 1998, Dr....   [tags: Nursing theory, relationships, health]

Strong Essays
1052 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Margret Rey

- Margret Rey Margret Elizabeth Rey was born May 16, 1906 in Hamburg, Germany. Her father, Felix Waldstein, was a well-known member of the German parliament and Margret was use to a lot of activities in the large house that was home to five children, four servants, and a dog, as well as her father's political colleagues, who were frequent visitors. Margret Rey received formal art training at the Bauhaus in 1927. She studied at the Dusseldorf Academy of Art from 1928 to 1929 at which time she held one-woman art shows of her watercolors in Berlin in the early thirties....   [tags: Essays Papers]

Free Essays
348 words | (1 pages) | Preview

To What Extent Did Margret Thatcher Impact the British Economy?

- ... This website written by Tejvan is valuable as it includes statistics and outlines Thatcher's success to show her positive involvement. It Includes information on Margaret's economic theories and beliefs, supply side polices and her contributions to the housing market as well as her contributions to the Lawson Boom of the 1980s. However its limitation includes having limited information for specific topics such as the Lawson Boom. Therefore this websites lacks detail. In addition, another limitation includes missing graph pictures which is needed to better understand how Margret Thatcher changed the British economy....   [tags: notorious UK prime ministers]

Term Papers
1788 words | (5.1 pages) | Preview

Comparing Illustrations of H. A. and Margret Rey's Opposites

- Comparing Illustrations of H. A. and Margret Rey's Opposites and Beatrix Potter's The Tale of Peter Rabbit Margret Rey and husband H.A. Rey are well known for their writing and illustrating the Curious George books. This paper is going to look at the way H. A. and Margret Rey and Beatrix Potter as authors and illustrators use images to express their feelings through these characters. H. A. and Margret Rey's Opposites, and Beatrix Potter's The Tale of Peter Rabbit will be compared and contrasted....   [tags: Compare Contrast Comparing]

Free Essays
728 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

princess margret

- British princess. Born August 21, 1930, at Glamis Castle in Scotland, as the second daughter of King George VI of the United Kingdom (who ruled from 1937 to his death in 1952) and sister of Queen Elizabeth II (1952--). In the early 1950s, the romance between Margaret—then third in line to the throne after her sister’s two children, Charles and Anne—and Group Captain Peter Townsend, a highly decorated World War II fighter pilot and recent divorcé, caused quite a scandal both within and outside of the British royal family....   [tags: essays research papers]

Free Essays
435 words | (1.2 pages) | Preview

The Oppression of Individual Differences

- In a world full of structure, the slightest wrong move could very well be one’s last. The opportunities are endless, but the risks are dangerously high. Kathleen Cameron stated, “Imagine a society where women are tortured and killed for disobeying this law- a society where religious beliefs, the political structure, and female sexual identity are so intertwined as to justify and require the control of women’s freedom, the sexual victimization of women, and the torture and murder of women who do not comply” (298)....   [tags: The Handmaid´s Tale, Margret Atwood, society]

Powerful Essays
1496 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell

- What is the title?: Gone with the Wind, an American classical novel and film detailing the love affair between an emotionally manipulative woman and a playfully mischievous man. Who is the author?: Margaret Mitchell, an American author who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 after publishing Gone with the Wind. What type of work is Gone with the Wind?: A novel that was later depicted in a motion picture. What is the genre?: Romance, historical fiction, and bildungsroman, or a storyline that carefully depicts the main character's maturation....   [tags: Margaret Mitchell, Analysis]

Powerful Essays
1621 words | (4.6 pages) | Preview

Tell-Tale Titles Of Margaret Laurence's A Bird In The House

- Margaret Laurence's A Bird in the House is a collection of short stories that is rich in symbols and similes. Descriptions like "claw hand", "flyaway manner" and "hair bound grotesquely like white-fingered wings" are found abundantly in the writer's novel. The Oxford English Dictionary defines symbols as, "something that stands for, represents, or denotes something else (not by exact resemblance, but by vague suggestion, or by some accidental or conventional relation)" (reference). Yet, there is nothing coincidental about Margaret Laurence's diction and her usage of symbols in "A Bird in the House" and "The Mask of the Bear"....   [tags: Margaret Laurence]

Free Essays
995 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- ... They took everything from her. The change started with her job, her money, her rights and it wasn 't the kind of society that she wanted to live in, to raise her child in. Next, when she, her husband, and their little girl were caught trying to escape to a place where they could be free, the new government took them away from her too. In the present tense of the story Offred flashes back to these memories, the times when she was free and happy. These flashbacks are one of the ways that we see that she is unhappy with the way that the society is because of all that she has been through....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
1344 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, published in 1985, explores the concept of a dystopian totalitarian Christian theocracy, the Republic of Gilead, that overthrows the United States government at an unspecified point in the near future. Gilead enforces a highly controlled patriarchal and militaristic society based on fundamentalist biblical principles. This new order is necessitated by widespread infertility caused by toxic pollution and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as many women ceasing to want children....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
2094 words | (6 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- ... Offred is looking for “gallantry from her, swashbuckling, heroism, single-handed combat.” (249). Instead, she finds a woman making understandable and seemingly defeated remarks about following the status quo and trying to get the best deal out of a bad situation. However, on page 243, Moira makes remarks about the men in control of society which reveal her hidden and small acts of rebellion: 'Who. ' she whispers back. 'That shit you 're with. I 've had him, he 's the pits. ' 'He 's my Commander, ' I say....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Better Essays
992 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- ... These new laws did not allow women to even be able to read or write and ultimately gave men all the power. In the bible it say "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth" (Matthew 5:5). Meek is meant to represent the humble loving and attitudes towards the people around them in the name of the lord. In the novel the sections which highlight meekness are used to have power over all women which the men crave. The only authorized religion that is allowed in Gilead is the one that benefits the state leaders....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Better Essays
1325 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- ... By wearing this uniform every day, Offred feels restricted as if she were in a prison cell. The obligatory wearing of a veil in Atwood 's dystopian society where women are silenced, oppressed and disempowered…it makes them nun-like, ostensibly pure, chaste, and virginal and it aids their effacement, actively disempowering them.” (David, 54-67.) Throughout the whole novel, Offred carries a bit of hope with her every day regardless the situation. She reminded herself of her memories to a time when she was carefree....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
1136 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- ... In the Red Center, the Handmaids are forced to cooperate with the Aunts by electric cattle prods, this includes very little, controlled socialization between Handmaids. The lack of socialization is continued on into the homes of the commanders where the Handmaids have a controlled relationship, or lack thereof, with everyone in the house. Offred also mentions the Commander’s office and how he spends most of his time there when he is home, implying that he works in his office. In pre-Gilead children start school at the age of four, and depending on the school system, would take mandatory classes until the age of 18....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
1344 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

- In a world dominated by religion it was thought that the only place where perfection existed was within God. In some cases, for instance the ontological argument, it was the proof to his existence. But in a modern world the concept of perfection has been distorted and comes with an abundance of seemingly negative consequences, ultimately putting into question whether or not perfection is even possible. In Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake the concept of perfection is constantly challenged in a world run by corporations who are trying to package human perfection and profit from it....   [tags: oryx and crake, margaret atwood ]

Term Papers
1939 words | (5.5 pages) | Preview

Biography of Margaret Thatcher

- Margaret Thatcher Power triumph, and authority. These are some of the most pronounce qualities possessed by none other than Margaret Baroness Thatcher. Throughout her lifetime, Thatcher was able to transform and lives of many. It was evident from the start that Thatcher would soon begin to influence life in the modern world. Margaret Thatcher contributed to the history, art and culture of Britain through woman’s rights, end of socialism, and the revitalizing the British economy. In her earlier years, Margaret attended Oxford University; majoring gin chemistry and later pursuing a law degree (The Path)....   [tags: woman’s rights, end of socialism]

Powerful Essays
1660 words | (4.7 pages) | Preview

Biography of Margaret Brent

- Margaret Brent stands out in the beginning of American history for her daring and self-determination. She never married but that did not keep stop her from flourishing in a world ruled by men. Instead, she became a successful businesswoman, trading land and servants, and earned the respect of Governor Leonard Calvert, who entrusted her with managing his estate upon his death. (Witkowski) While these achievements were both unusual and significant, Margaret is best known for being the first woman in America to request the right to vote....   [tags: american history, women, right to vote]

Better Essays
922 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

The Misogyny Of The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- ... The protagonist’s mind was indoctrinated by Aunts to be accept the internalized oppression, and her fate. Aunt Lydia, and the other Aunts corral the Handmaid’s and teach them their purpose in life. The Aunts are the only representation of female power in The Handmaid’s Tale. At the Reeducation Center equipped with “cattle prods…and brain washing slogans” (118) the Aunts encourage and teach women to deceive and betray each other. “Danger was from the other [Handmaids]” not always the Aunts. (88) The aunts taught them that “friendship were suspicious” (87) Women couldn’t be friends....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
1191 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Marriage is not a Game as Seen in Margaret Atwood's Habitation

- Margaret Atwood is a Canadian novelist and poet whose writing usually treats contemporary issues, such as feminism, sexual politics, and the intrusive nature of mass society. While she is best known for her works as a novelist, her poetry is also noteworthy. One of her notable poems, “Habitation,” discusses the seriousness of marriage. The speaker basically gives a message that the marriage is not a game or a play; rather, it is a serious, unstable condition that calls for a lot of effort and attention to maintain harmony....   [tags: Margaret Atwood, poems, Habitation, ]

Better Essays
806 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Ryan Lee 11-21-14 AP Literature Period 7 The Handmaids Tale Essay Whether women are equal to men or not this is an ongoing topic that brings to light many different opinions. The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood, is a fictional yet plausible story that Atwood uses to warn us of the possibility of our society changing into her dystopian fantasy. To convey her argument, Atwood uses the point of view of a women named Offred to demonstrate the morals and struggles of women in this male-dominated society known as Gilead....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
1062 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale provides a look into a dystopian world of complete male dominance. Women have been entirely denied of their basic needs, and are no longer able to live as individuals. For decades preceding the creation of Gilead, women were regarded as subordinate to men. These inequalities often led women to believe they were inferior and lacked the knowledge and power men seemed to display. They were not granted access to voting rights, equal wages, or job opportunities. As the years progressed, women fought for equal rights; however, these accomplishments were soon revoked with the transition of the United States, into a totalitarian region known as The Republic of G...   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
1333 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- ... For instance, the story of Moira, a friend whom Offred assumes is dead soon after their last encounter, is included in her recount. Offred also hears stories from others. The unbiased, transparent truth comes from the seedier underbelly of Gilead’s society, while the Commander’s, the Aunt’s, and the media preach lies or purposefully leave out crucial information. The Commander reads from the Bible some nights, selecting specific verses to prove that a man should have multiple partners. Offred often hears Bible verses quoted and “...[knows they are] wrong… but there [is] no way of checking” (Atwood, 89) due to the undeniable reality that she is not permitted to read....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
1046 words | (3 pages) | Preview

A Critical Analysis of Margaret Atwood's Writing Style

- ... However winning these awards was not an easy task. She has a unique vision within her poems that ties in greatly with her childhood and parents. Margaret Atwood developed a complex view of the world, from which she developed her poetic vision. Growing up in Canada Margaret Atwood has developed some very nationalist Canadian views (A Critical Companion by Natalie Cooke, pg.9) But, that is not the only thing that she developed growing up in the wilderness of Ontario. Because her dad was an ecologist she spent many summers within the wilderness of Ontario (A Critical Companion by Natalie Cooke, pg.3)....   [tags: poems, nature, childhood]

Better Essays
881 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

Colonialism in Margaret Atwood's Surfacing

- Colonialism in Margaret Atwood's 'Surfacing' Margaret Atwood's novel 'Surfacing' demonstrates the complex question of identity for an English-speaking Canadian female. Identity, for the protagonist has become problematic because of her role as a victim of colonial forces. She has been colonized by men in the patriarchal society in which she grew up, by Americans and their cultural imperialism, or neo-colonialism as it has come to be known as, and the Euro-centric legacy that remains in her country although the physical presence of English and French rulers have gone....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Surfacing]

Powerful Essays
2900 words | (8.3 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- I Tell, Therefore I Am In Margaret Atwood’s, The Handmaid’s Tale, women are subjected to unthinkable oppression. Practically every aspect of their life is controlled, and they are taught to believe that their only purpose is to bear children for their commander. These “handmaids” are not allowed to read, write or speak freely. Any type of expression would be dangerous to the order of the Gilead’s strict society. They are conditioned to believe that they are safer in this new society. Women are supposedly no longer exploited or disrespected (pornography, rape, etc.) as they once were....   [tags: Margaret Atwood The Handmaid's Tale]

Free Essays
878 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

Relationships and Religion in "The Handmaids Tale" by Margaret Atwood

- In the novel The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood the themes of Religion and inter-human relationships are the themes that are most evident in the text. This novel shows the possibility of the existence of an all-powerful governing system. This is portrayed through the lack of freedom for women in society, from being revoked of their right to own any money or property, to being stripped of their given names and acquiring names such as Offred and Ofglen, symbolizing women’s dependant existence, only being defined by the men which they belong to....   [tags: Handmaids Tale, Margaret Atwood, relationships, re]

Better Essays
613 words | (1.8 pages) | Preview

Rape Fantasies by Margaret Atwood

- Rape Fantasies by Margaret Atwood "Rape Fantasies" is written by Margaret Atwood in 1977. Basically this short story is about the narrator, named Estelle, recalling a conversation of several women during their lunch hour. It starts with one of Estelle's co-workers, asking the question 'How about it, girls, do you have rape fantasies?'(pg 72) The story goes on with each woman telling their supposed 'rape fantasy' to one another. As each is telling their fantasy, Estelle is doing her best to try to deflect the situation by making jokes about their fantasies....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Rape Fantasies Essays]

Free Essays
439 words | (1.3 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale Love of God replaces love of humanity in Margaret Atwood’s, The Handmaid’s Tale. Offred’s recollections of her past life, especially of her husband, are ones filled with passion and happiness as she remembers his tenderness towards her. Much more emphasis is put on the physical human form in her memories; she often remembers lying with her husband while she wears little or no clothing. Appreciation of the human form is an essential component of loving humanity....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Handmaid Tale Essays]

Powerful Essays
1418 words | (4.1 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale Chapter nine opening section two of the novel is mainly recalling the last chapters and about the narrator rediscovering herself, surfacing the truth. In section one we see the narrator talking in the present tense in a very descriptive form, outlining the novel. However in section two we see her talking in the past tense demonstrating the stories she is telling. The separation between the human and the natural world and the narrator’s struggle with language most directly portrays the novel's dualities....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Handmaid's Tale Essays]

Powerful Essays
1712 words | (4.9 pages) | Preview

The Symbolism of the Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence

- The Symbolism of the Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence Margaret Laurence's novel, The Stone Angel is a compelling journey of flashbacks seen through the eyes of Hagar Shipley, a ninety year-old woman nearing the end of her life.  In the novel, Margaret Laurence, uses the stone angel to effectively symbolize fictional characters.   The term symbolism in its broadest sense means the use of an object to stand for something other than itself.  In The Stone Angel, Margaret Laurence uses the stone angel to sybmolize the Currie family values and pride and in particular, the pride and cold personality traits of Hagar Shipley.  There are three primary areas where the stone angel is used to symbo...   [tags: Stone Angel Margaret Laurence Essays]

Powerful Essays
1602 words | (4.6 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid 's Tale And Kindred

- ... Nobody ever comes back to tell you about it”(145). Here we see the disbelief in a slave that freedom was a real possibility. Tess compares freedom to heaven and thus makes it seem like a far off unattainable thing that is only achieved after death. Butler is commenting on the fact that this race of people had been beaten down so badly that freedom was not a realistic idea that the majority of the slaves thought was possible. Tess says “What others?” as if she doesn’t even think that freed slaves exist....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Slavery]

Strong Essays
1509 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood's Surfacing

- Margaret Atwood's 'Surfacing' Throughout the book the narrator constantly intertwines the past and present as though it is side by side. Atwood shows this in the opening sentence ‘’I can’t believe I’m on this road again’’. The use of the adjective ‘again’ reveals the narrator has been in this place in an earlier life. The narrator seems to repress a lot of her past and continuously contradicts herself, which at times confuses the reader as we can not tell whether she is talking about her past or her present and whether she regards it as home as she says ‘’Now were on home ground foreign territory’’....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Surfacing Essays]

Strong Essays
1297 words | (3.7 pages) | Preview

The 's Handmaid 's Tale

- ... She discards the female and male sexual interactions, which is the only kind that the Republic of Gilead will accept. Moira also used her rejection of the interactions between people to form her basis to become a lesbian, which is a form of rebellion against the Republic. Moira is also the only character in the novel to stand up directly to the authority, and also at the same time rejecting the new identity that she was given. She reflected her disgust of the Republic of Gilead by escaping on her second try....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

Strong Essays
1240 words | (3.5 pages) | Preview

Woman in the Nineteenth Century, by Margaret Fuller

- Woman in the Nineteenth Century, by Margaret Fuller In her essay, Woman in the Nineteenth Century, Margaret Fuller discusses the state of marriage in America during the 1800‘s. She is a victim of her own knowledge, and is literally considered ugly because of her wisdom. She feels that if certain stereotypes can be broken down, women can have the respect of men intellectually, physically, and emotionally. She explains why some of the inequalities exist in marriages around her. Fuller feels that once women are accepted as equals, men and women will be able achieve a true love not yet known to the people of the world....   [tags: Woman in the Nineteenth Century Margaret Fuller]

Good Essays
1136 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

- Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace Alias Grace is the most recent novel by Margaret Atwood, Canada’s most prominent modern novelist. The novel is, as Atwood writes in her afterword, ‘a work of fiction, although it is based on reality’(538) centred on the case of Victorian Canada’s most celebrated murderess, Grace Marks, an immigrant Irish servant girl. The manner in which Atwood imaginatively reconfigures historical fact in order to create a subversive text which ‘writes back’ to both the journals of a Canadian literary ancestor, and to Canada’s nineteenth century self -image, illustrates what critic Linda Hutcheon has called ‘the use of irony as a powerful subversive rule in the rethinking and...   [tags: Margaret Atwood Alias Grace Essays]

Powerful Essays
1661 words | (4.7 pages) | Preview

The Manipulative Sirens and Their Victims in Margaret Atwood's Siren Song

- The Manipulative Sirens and Their Victims in Margaret Atwood's Siren Song In Homer's Odyssey, the Sirens are mythical creatures whose enchanting voices lure sailors to their deaths. These women have fascinated people ever since Homer sung the lines of his epic, inspiring artists of many genres from oil paintings to films. In her poem "Siren Song," Margaret Atwood re-envisions the Sirens to draw a comparison between the myths and modern life. Atwood portrays men as victims of "Sirens" (women) by making her readers the victims....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Siren Song Essays]

Strong Essays
1297 words | (3.7 pages) | Preview

Representation of Colors in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- Representation of Colors in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale Imagine if you can, living in a world that tells you what you are to wear, where to live, as well as your position and value to society. In Margaret Atwood's novel, The Handmaid's Tale, she shows us the Republic of Gilead does just that. Offred, the main character, is a Handmaid, whose usefulness is her ovaries. Handmaids are ordered to live in a house with a Commander, his wife, and once a month attempt to become pregnant by the Commander....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Atwood Margaret Essays]

Powerful Essays
1784 words | (5.1 pages) | Preview

Society in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

- “Atwood’s feminism is an integral part of her critical approach, just as her concept of criticism is inseparable from her creative work” Walter Pache (1). A dystopia is a fictional society, usually existing in a future time period, in which the condition of life is extremely difficult due to deprivation, oppression or terror. In most dystopian fiction, a corrupt government creates or sustains the poor quality of life, often conditioning the masses to believe the society is proper and just, even perfect....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Margaret Atwood Essays]

Research Papers
2516 words | (7.2 pages) | Preview

Intertwined Themes of Margaret Atwood's Dancing Girls

- The Intertwined Themes of Margaret Atwood's Dancing Girls     Dancing Girls is a collection of Margaret Atwood's short stories. Each story captures a different aspect of society, different people of different ages, culture and status, with different attitudes, emotions and behavior; all in different locations and life circumstances. Yet there are many connections between the stories and these links are primarily found in Atwood's portrayal of women. As Atwood says: By and large my novel's center on women...None of them are about miners in the mines, seamen on the sea, convicts in the jail, the boys in the backroom, the locker rooms at the football game…How come....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Dancing Girls Essays]

Powerful Essays
2149 words | (6.1 pages) | Preview

Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwells and The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

- Dystopia: a society characterized by a focus on mass poverty, squalor, suffering, or oppression, that society has most often brought upon itself. Dystopia itself has been a subject of extreme fascination for centuries, and has brought us some of the most revered written works of our time. Dystopian fiction, born from the idea of dystopia, is commentaries, satires and most often warnings. Settings in the far off future, with laws and regimes unimaginable, dystopian fiction bring new perspectives on social and political problems of society....   [tags: dystopian societies, poverty]

Better Essays
1159 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

An Artist in her Way: Representations of the Woman Artist in Margaret Oliphant's Kirsteen

- Representations of the Woman Artist in Margaret Oliphant's Kirsteen Margaret Oliphant (1828-97) was a prolific writer. She published almost 100 novels as well as biographies, art criticism, travel writing, historical sketches, and over two hundred articlesfor periodicals like Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine andThe Cornhill Magazine, yet her ambivalence about representing herself as a serious artist in her Autobiography provides Oliphant aficionados with grist for speculation and conjecture: did Oliphant even think of herself as an artist....   [tags: Margaret Oliphant Kirsteen Essays]

Free Essays
3226 words | (9.2 pages) | Preview

The United States as a Dystopian society in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid’s Tale

- In the Days of Anarchy To live in a country such as the United States of America is considered a privilege. The liberties that American citizens are entitled to, as declared in the Constitution, makes the United States an attractive and envied democracy. It would be improbable to imagine these liberties being stripped from American society. However, Margaret Atwood depicts the United States as a dystopian society in her novel The Handmaid’s Tale. The first society is modern America, with its autonomy and liberal customs....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Handmaid's Tale]

Free Essays
1122 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

Margaret Wise Brown's The Making of Goodnight Moon

- Margaret Wise Brown's The Making of Goodnight Moon The numerous books that Margaret Wise Brown wrote during her short career hold a special place in the hearts of children and their parents. Many readers have no understanding of the scrutiny a book goes through before it reaches the printing press, a book's ultimate goal. Even though Brown would publish several books a year, none is more cherished than "the hypnotic, mystery-laden words and joyful pictures of Goodnight Moon" (Marcus, The Making of Goodnight Moon, 3)....   [tags: Margaret Wise Brown Making of Goodnight Moon]

Strong Essays
1064 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Illustration and Color in Margaret Wise Brown’s Children's Books

- The Importance of Illustration and Color in Margaret Wise Brown’s Children's Books Margaret Wise Brown’s The Runaway Bunny is probably one of the most popular children’s books of the last two generations. Readers love the gentle magic of the words, and loving pictures. The illustrations of Brown’s children’s books fulfill the concerns and emotions of the child reader. Clement Hurd was the illustrator of The Runaway Bunny, Goodnight Moon, and many of his own books. The Dream Book is another children’s book written by Brown and illustrated by Richard Floethe....   [tags: Margaret Wise Brown Children's Books]

Better Essays
625 words | (1.8 pages) | Preview

Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis and The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood

- Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis and The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood The adolescent years are often associated with turbulence, illusion, and self-discovery; however, Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim and Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman demonstrate that more often than not, the twenties possess these qualities to a greater extent than adolescence. The age period of the twenties often consists of relationships, employment and self issues and using the premise of these uncertain times, Amis and Atwood effectively satire various societal systems....   [tags: Lucky Jim Amis Edible Margaret Atwood Essays]

Powerful Essays
1591 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

The Troubles of Being a Woman

- Canadian feminist author, Margaret Atwood, has written many novels, short stories, and poems reflecting the difficulties women have faced throughout the late 1900s. By creating characters that portray the new woman, Atwood’s relatable yet surprising plots demonstrate the struggles women have gone through to earn their standings in society. Now, in the twenty-first century, women have earned a nearly equal status to men in many important areas. Some of these areas include occupation, education, and intelligence....   [tags: women, society, Margaret Atwood, fertility, role]

Term Papers
2177 words | (6.2 pages) | Preview

The Affliction Of Margaret.

- The Affliction of Margaret The antagonist of all life, death- people quiver at the sight of the word. My job is to let the process of death happen. I come and go into people’s lives, most humans can’t even see me, and only the ones near death can. Once you see me, you’re swallowed into the jaws of death. It’s a miserable job, but someone has to do it. Today is a particularly miserable day because I have to go to a care home the home of the living dead....   [tags: English-language films, Death, Sun, Afterlife]

Strong Essays
1006 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

"Absalom, Absalom!" and "Gone With The Wind"

- William Faulkner's classic Absalom, Absalom!, certainly ranks among the gems of twentieth century American literature and indeed is arguably the best Southern novel ever written. Indeed it might well be thought of as a metaphor of the Confederate legacy of the lost cause myth, which so desperately seeks an answer for how such a noble cause, championed by just and honorable men went down in utter collapse and defeat. For among the sorted affairs of the Sutpen clan lie the elements of destruction of Southern society....   [tags: legacy, South, William Faulkner, Margaret Mitchell]

Strong Essays
1087 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

Use of Water in Margaret Laurence's The Stone Angel

- Water can symbolize many things throughout the novel. Whether it is in Manawaka, the Pacific Coast or Shadow point, what is constantly recognized in the number of times water is used. If one were to closely examine these situations, they would soon discover it's symbolic importance. In the novel The Stone Angel, water is presented in the many fluctuations, in Hagar's life. Hagar goes through many stages in her life, where water is represented but without it being physically present. Without the imagery of water, the story would be less effective and meaningful for the reader....   [tags: Margaret Laurence]

Good Essays
937 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

Margaret Mary Bell of "Galatea"

- In the short story “Galatea,” Margaret Mary Bell meets William Bell when she’s at a playground with her sister. Margaret and William end up getting together and getting married pretty quickly. Suddenly one by one Margaret’s belongings disappear and she doesn’t understand why William is doing this. William ends up leaving Margaret and leaves her with nothing and no reasons why he took the stuff or himself away from her. She ends up finding out that William is the Collegetown Creeper. Margaret definitely stood out to me after reading “Galatea.” There are some characteristics of her that I liked, and others that I thought were a little ridiculous....   [tags: Literary Characters]

Good Essays
551 words | (1.6 pages) | Preview

The Loons By Margaret Laurence

- Jessica Cribb Mrs. Keatings ENG3UO-E December. 3rd, 2014 The Loons Margaret Laurence is one of many Canadian authors who incorporate real life events into her stories. The Loons, written by Margaret Laurence, deals with the theme that people have trouble with themselves, who they are, and who they want to be. Jean Margaret (Peggy) Wemyss (before she got married), was only four years old when her mother, Verna Jean passed away. This unfortunate event not only affected her, but her family too. A few years later Margaret’s father, Robert Wemyss, got remarried to her deceased mother’s sister, Margaret Campbell Simpson....   [tags: Family, Mother, Marriage, University of Winnipeg]

Strong Essays
859 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

Are You There, Reader? It's Me Margaret

- Joseph Michael Sommers, has written an article on one of Judy Blume’s most iconic coming of age story; Are You There, God. It’s Me Margaret. In this article he speaks about the nature of this novel and how it speaks to young adolescent females. He speaks about the connection the novel has between the protagonist and the reader. Sommer’s argument is that the protagonist breaks the fourth wall and seeks outside intervention to her troubles in her life. The author speaks about the boundaries Judy Blume has tested....   [tags: Literary Analysis]

Powerful Essays
1642 words | (4.7 pages) | Preview

The Great Lawsuit by Margaret Fuller

- The Great Lawsuit Throughout the centuries there have been many groups pursuing equal rights for themselves. These groups feel that they are excluded from privileges others possess and are subject to injustices that others are not. These groups feel they deserve better and that their presence in the world is unequal to others’. In the United States a large percentage of women started to feel they warranted equal rights to men. Margaret Fuller was among the supporters of the movement and published ground-breaking article called “The Great Lawsuit.” In “The Great Lawsuit”, Margaret Fuller tries to stop the great inequalities between men and women by describing great marriages where the husband...   [tags: Groups, Equal Rights]

Strong Essays
1002 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

Margaret Walker and the Harlem Renaissance

- A Contemporary writer, living in a contemporary world, when she speaks of and for her people older voices are mixed with hers- the voices of Methodist forebears and preachers who preached the word, the anonymous voices of many who lived and were forgotten and yet out of bondage and hope made a lasting music. (Benet 3-4) For the purpose of this chapter, these words by Stephen Vincent Benet in his foreword to Margaret Walker’s first volume of poetry, For My People (1942) are really important. They give an idea about the richness of the literary heritage from which Walker started to write and to which she later added....   [tags: american history, poetry]

Powerful Essays
1435 words | (4.1 pages) | Preview

Theater With a Conscience: Margaret Fleming

- During the 1890's, American audiences still saw theater as a form of entertainment and therefore, it could not be considered a medium through which to comment on the social situation of the society. However, across the Atlantic, Henrik Ibsen was steadily bringing realist drama to prominence and simultaneously achieving critical acclaim. At home, James A. Herne débuted his radical play, Margaret Fleming, but achieved little success. However, it did draw both positive and negative criticism. Such a varied reaction to such a controversial play at such a pivotal time must have a profound effect on the society that existed during this time....   [tags: Theater]

Term Papers
2501 words | (7.1 pages) | Preview

A Bird Of The House By Margaret Laurence

- In the novel A Bird In The House, Margaret Laurence illustrates the theme of physical entrapment. All of the characters in the novel feel the need to escape their personal situations. In fact, the title is a symbol of entrapment because of the bird that is trapped in the house and it is also trying to get out. From my background knowledge, the bird usually portrays an image of bad luck that follow afterwards and in this novel, that is the beginning of all the bad events that occur in the remaining of the novel....   [tags: Emotion, Family, Illness, Novel]

Strong Essays
976 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

The Contribution Of Margaret Sanger

- ... As the primary leader of this movement, she played a hugely significant role in publicising contraceptive techniques and giving advice in family planning. Over the span of her life, she changed the way society thought of birth control. She brought it out of the hidden whispers of people who were afraid to speak of it, to an almost normal and acceptable conversation among all classes of people. She was the voice of advice when women sought it, and she was the educator that helped those that were unaware and needing....   [tags: Abortion, Human rights, Birth control]

Strong Essays
1619 words | (4.6 pages) | Preview

The Treaty Of Versailles By Margaret Macmillan

- ... The reader can begin to understand, because of MacMillan’s argument, why creating the Treaty of Versailles was such a daunting task and how it could go askew in the process. In another academic piece written by MacMillan she explains that it is unfair to remember the Paris Peace Conference as a failure, which is so often done. MacMillan points out that it always needs to be remembered that the conference took place in the aftermath of not only the worst world war, but at the time, the only one that had taken place....   [tags: Treaty of Versailles, World War I, Woodrow Wilson]

Better Essays
1428 words | (4.1 pages) | Preview

A Bird in the House by Margaret Laurence

- In A Bird in the House, Margaret Laurence is able to incorporate many themes and motifs into her stories such as, war, tragedy, religion, and faith. Another theme that is also shown throughout the book is identity, both national and individual identity. National identity is defined as “ a sense of a nation as a cohesive whole, as represented by distinctive traditions, culture, etc.” (“national identity”), while individual identity is what makes a person unique, it is what a person believes, thinks and feels....   [tags: war, tragedy, religion]

Powerful Essays
1414 words | (4 pages) | Preview

Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind

- ... Gone with the Wind’s protagonist is the head strong and stubborn Scarlett O’Hara. Miss Scarlett is the spoiled, fiery tempered daughter of Irish immigrant parents who prospered in the agricultural society of the south. The story begins in 1861 when Scarlett was a young girl, a Southern Belle, born to privilege, and her most difficult decision is which beau to dine with at the afternoon barbeque. The reader follows her life as well as her moral and psychological growth as she braves the horrors of war, struggling to survive the apocalypse that destroyed all she had ever known....   [tags: epic tales, story analysis]

Strong Essays
905 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

Isolation Of The Flood By Margaret Atwood

- Isolation in the Year of the Flood With today’s novels, authors tend to include characters that readers can easily relate to in different situations. In the Year of the Flood, Margaret Atwood incorporates isolation in her writing to help the reader acknowledge and empathize with her characters by using different types of isolation. An examination of the novel reveals that characters experience physical isolation, mental isolation and emotional isolation. Characters experiencing isolation can really give a chance for the reader to connect with them and makes reading a more pleasurable experience....   [tags: Emotion, The Reader]

Strong Essays
1737 words | (5 pages) | Preview

Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitchell

- ... At the same time, Scarlett loses her husband of two months to measles and pneumonia and is left to take care of their child, Wade Hampton Hamilton. She solemnly follows the expectations of a widow for a short period of time by wearing “hideous black dresses without even a touch of braid... [and] a black crêpe veil on her bonnet” (Mitchell 114). Additionally, she could “never chatter vivaciously or laugh aloud.. [and] could in no way indicate an interest in the company of gentlemen” (Mitchell 114)....   [tags: American Civil War, Slavery in the United States]

Strong Essays
1360 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

Alias Grace, by Margaret Atwood

- Set in the Victorian era where women remained at the bottom of the social and economic ladder, Alias Grace's female characters emerged out of the stereotypes of its time. Not only were they unique and extremely dynamic but Margaret Atwood's characters stood for more than just the unconventional women of such a society. They were strong and able women who overcome the traumas in their lives. They chose not to be labelled by impressions of the ideal women rather they made their own mark in society....   [tags: victorian era]

Better Essays
890 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

The Handmaids Tale, by Margaret Atwood

- In Margaret Atwoods ‘The Handmaids Tale’, we hear of one women’s posting ‘Offred’ in the Republic of Gilead. A society based around Biblical philosophies as a way to validate inhumane state practises. In a society of declining birth rates, fertile women are chosen to become Handmaids, walking incubators, whose role in life is to reproduce for barren wives of commanders. Older women, gay men, and barren Handmaids are sent to the colonies to clean toxic waste. Fear is power. Fear is ever-present in Gilead; it is implemented through violence and force....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Summary]

Better Essays
735 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

- Imagine growing up in a society where all women are useful for is to reproduce. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood is an excellent novel of what could potentially be the fate of the future one day. The main character, Offred, moves into a new home where she is there to perform “rituals” with the Commander, head of the house, so she can hopefully reproduce herself. Basically, she is a sex slave and birthing a healthy child is all she is wanted for. Also if she does have a child then she will be treated better, so it can be stressful for these women....   [tags: Women, Gender Roles, Reproduction]

Better Essays
942 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood

- “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any”-Alice Walker. What this quote really means is that people are hopeless and they don’t realize on what they could do. They only focus on what’s going to happen next and about their safety, but they don’t notice that they are giving up their power to the government, leaving them powerless. Margaret Atwood examines power and peoples attempts to control each other. People in Gilead are viewed based on their social classes....   [tags: gilead, dystopian society, power]

Better Essays
775 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

The 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- ... These comments prove that men in today’s society only see women as sexual dolls to play with and molest. These abusive comments show that a society where women are used only for sex is not a successful one. In the movie however, sex is not an act often talked about or seen in the community. Men and women are not taught to have sex, even for the purpose of reproduction, they are given a child when they are ready. This ensures that men or women do not mistreat each other for sex or other sexual acts....   [tags: Gender, Feminism, The Handmaid's Tale, Gender role]

Strong Essays
1457 words | (4.2 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood : A Lyrical

- ... In “They Eat Out” (1976), Atwood describes the sociocultural inequalities between men and women by exploring the female perspective of a social event as simple as a dinner out. The premise of this poem is a woman’s disdain for her husband, in his being metaphorically praised for paying for her meal. Atwood poetically describes the couple as they argue over the bill and the woman losing. Atwood’s recurring feminist theme is present in this poem as the female narrator details that the male character is only able to pay for their meals if she, herself, gives him that power....   [tags: Woman, Gender, Female, Man]

Strong Essays
960 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

Billy Elliot and Margaret Thatcher

- The film, Billy Elliot, is about the social and personal crisis and the everyday life during the era of Margaret Thatcher. It is also about the social differences and stereotypes which still exist in the society. In this research paper I will analyse various roles in the family and the relationships of the characters in Billy Elliot during era of Thatcherism. I will focus on Billy’s relationships with people who somehow influence him from his grandmother to his ballet trainer. We can explore the political and cultural background of Thatcherism to understand the events in the film....   [tags: Thatcherism]

Good Essays
1886 words | (5.4 pages) | Preview

The Diviners by Margaret Laurence

- Literature is a cultural construct and provides us with valuable insights into the development of Societies. It helps psychological understanding and reformations of espistemological constructs. Literature in itself is a rich source material for interpreting the past. Women’s writings focus attention on the manifestation of female sensibility, feminine reality and on its significance as a means of bringing about an awareness of this reality. Feminism being an important movement in the modern world, a woman’s place, position and especially the quest for her identity and importance, are not duly recognized....   [tags: literature, women]

Strong Essays
1037 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Ryan White and Margaret Atwood

- Ryan Wayne White was born on December 6, 1971 in Kokomo, Indiana. At three days old, he was diagnosed with Hemophilia A, a life-threatening blood disorder. To treat this disorder, he received blood transfusions of Factor VIII weekly. In 1984, during a procedure to remove a portion of his left lung due to pneumonia, White was diagnosed with AIDS. From that point on, his life became a battle in all aspects—for his health, for his education, for his friends. Although White passed away in 1990, he is remembered as a fighter and a poster-child for AIDS education....   [tags: Literature, Abortion]

Term Papers
1825 words | (5.2 pages) | Preview

Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake

- The Ending of the Human Race Margaret Atwood’s novel Oryx and Crake is considered to be a world time dystopian masterpiece. Atwood presents an apocalyptic atmosphere through the novel’s antagonist, Crake, and protagonist, Jimmy/Snowman. She does this when Crake uses his scientific knowledge and wickedness to eliminate and recreate an entirely new society. “Future-Technology was envisioned as a way to easing the burden of life, and it was accepted that slavery would remain a tacit part of human existence until there would be some effective replacement for it, for until the shuttle would weave and the plectrum touch the lyre without a hand to guide them (bk.1, pt.4), there would be a need for...   [tags: novel, literary analysis]

Strong Essays
1284 words | (3.7 pages) | Preview

Happy Endings by Margaret Atwood

- Margaret Atwood’s “Happy Endings” is an Author’s telling of societal beliefs that encompass the stereotypical gender roles and the pursuit of love in the middle class with dreams of romance and marriage. Atwood writes about the predictable ways in which many life stories are concluded for the middle class; talking about the typical everyday existence of the average, ordinary person and how they live their lives. Atwood provides the framework for several possibilities regarding her characters’ lives and how each character eventually completes their life with their respective “happy ending”....   [tags: story and character analysis]

Powerful Essays
1363 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood

- Margaret Atwood’s novel, Alias Grace, nominated for the Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel, depicts a young 16 year old girl who is found guilty of murdering her employer and his lover in conspiracy with James McDerrmott. James McDermott is put to death by hanging, but Grace is brought to prison because she is of the “weaker sex.” This is a reflection of the construction of femininity and masculinity of the mid and late nineteenth century. A social issue of the Victorian age was women being treated as subordinate to men....   [tags: victorian era, subordinate women]

Powerful Essays
1338 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

Eating Green By Margaret Lundberg

- ... Although the example can gain the reader’s attention, it doesn’t contain any emotions that would provoke people to make a change. Emotion pulls people in with their compassion, making them open their hearts to the idea and not just the numbers and results. “Eating Green” contains both personal and evidential examples to prove the point of becoming a vegan. Lundberg asks herself an important question: “What if we could establish that a vegetarian diet would benefit not only our personal health, but the health of the planet as well?” (481-82)....   [tags: Meat, Vegetarianism, Veganism]

Strong Essays
1226 words | (3.5 pages) | Preview

Identity Theft, By Margaret Rouse

- ... When trying to receive information through an ATM, thieves will use a technique known as skimming. This is when they obtain credit card information when you swipe your card by attaching data storage devices to an ATM. Lastly, direct theft is stealing things like a purse or wallet from the house. The most frequent identity thefts include working from home, credit card fraud, phishing, and email. (How Does Identity Theft Happen?) Identity theft is a serious crime. When one’s identity is stolen, there are many things that the thief may do....   [tags: Identity theft, Theft, Credit card fraud]

Better Essays
839 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

Blessed Margaret of Savoy

- Margaret of Savoy was a dedicated woman. She was unlike anyone else. She had wealth, power, and good looks but she didn’t use any of those things to her advantage. Many looked at her as being a powerful royal daughter but as I learned more about her I learned that she was and is much more than that. Prince Amadeus went to Geneva to arrange for his marriage which was customary, especially for the ruling families in Europe. His choice was determined by the recommendations of his suzerain (to whom people must pay tribute to)....   [tags: saints, catholisism, ]

Powerful Essays
1470 words | (4.2 pages) | Preview

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.


Your search returned over 400 essays for "Margret"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>