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John Donne: A True Metaphysical Poet

- John Donne is unanimously acknowledged as a true metaphysical poet because he made an unlike conceptual thought against the Elizabethan poetry, showed an analytical pattern of love and affection and displayed an essence of dissonance in words and expressions. This paper concentrates on the exploration of the characteristics of Donne’s metaphysical poetry highlighting extended form of epigrams, conceits, paradoxes and ratiocinations. Donne in respect of the manifestation of metaphysical beauty was an unparallel and super ordinate among all poets such as Richard Crashaw, Henry Vaughan, Abraham Cowley, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell and many more....   [tags: John Donne ]

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The Flea By John Donne

- John Donne is known as being one of the most famous and influential metaphysical poets. The term “metaphysical," as applied to English and continental European poets of the seventeenth century, was used by Augustan poets John Dryden and Samuel Johnson to reprove those poets for their “unnaturalness.” As Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote, however, “The unnatural, that too is natural," and the metaphysical poets continue to be studied and revered for their intricacy and originality. Due to Donne’s personal experiences with spirituality and love, he is able to grasp the true meaning of metaphysical poetry (Brief Guide to Metaphysical Poets)....   [tags: Metaphysical poets, John Donne, Poetry]

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John Donne And George Herbert

- John Donne and George Herbert: the Metaphysical Brothers of Poetry Although not an official or formal school of poetry Metaphysical Poetry is widely present in 17th century English poetry. According to the Norton Anthology of English Literature, English poets such as Herbert, Vaughan, Crashaw, Marvell, Traherne, and Cowley can all be attributed as Metaphysical poets (1262). Coined by critics such as Samuel Johnson and William Hazlitt, Metaphysical poetry contains complex conceits and self-conscious leaning (1262)....   [tags: Metaphysical poets, John Donne, T. S. Eliot]

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Metaphysical Poetry By John Donne

- While metaphysical poetry consists of a specific style with expected patterns, different poets emphasize different aspects of as much, choosing to highlight the importance of the conceit, the intermingling of the spiritual and the physical, the need for meditation, and so on. For example, John Donne tends to worry himself with metaphysical conceits to the ends of the universe and back, overdeveloping extended metaphors to the point where the specific object that another is being compared to is referred to in every line....   [tags: Metaphysical poets, John Donne, T. S. Eliot]

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Biography And Cultural Influences Of John Donne

- Alonso Trevino Biography and cultural influences John Donne, an outstanding English poet of the Metaphysical school, is usually considered the greatest loved poet in the English language. The metaphysical poets are known for their capacity to frighten the reader and persuade new aspects through paradoxical images, inventive syntax and imagery using a metaphor known as conceit. John Donne was born in London, England in 1572. He was born in a Catholic family, during that time England was facing a strong anti-Catholic period....   [tags: John Donne, Metaphysical poets, Poetry]

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Biography And Cultural Influences Of John Donne

- Biography and cultural influences John Donne, an outstanding English poet of the Metaphysical school, is usually considered the greatest loved poet in the English language. The metaphysical poets are known for their capacity to frighten the reader and persuade new aspects through paradoxical images, inventive syntax and imagery using a metaphor known as conceit. John Donne was born in London, England in 1572. He was born in a Catholic family, during that time England was facing a strong anti-Catholic period....   [tags: John Donne, Metaphysical poets, Poetry]

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The Analysis Of The Profane And Sacred In John Donne's Poems 'The Flea' And 'Holy Sonnet 14'

- John Donne who is considered to be one of the wittiest poets of the seventeenth century writes the metaphysical poem "The Flea" and the religious poem "Holy Sonnet 14". In both poems, Donne explores the two opposing themes of physical and sacred love; in his love poem "The Flea," he depicts the speaker as an immoral human being who is solely concerned with pleasing himself, where as in his sacred poem "Holy Sonnet 14" Donne portrays the speaker as a noble human being because he is anxious to please God....   [tags: John Donne]

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Analysis Of John Donne 's ' God The Father '

- During the 16th century, England was experiencing economic and population growth that sparked the Renaissance style of writing. In A Hymn to God the Father written by English poet John Donne, many issues are addressed about the Christian faith while God’s authority is challenged. When analyzing A Hymn to God the Father, the reader is able to understand the importance of Christianity during the 1600s and how it shaped the English culture. John Donne had an interesting view of life and many questions that he constantly begged God to answer....   [tags: Christianity, England, John Donne]

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John Donne 's Holy Sonnet X

- John Donne’s “Holy Sonnet X,” alternatively referred to as “Death, Be Not Proud,” is a component of a larger group of sonnets. As a whole, Donne’s nineteen Holy Sonnets entreat God’s mercy upon the speaker and herald salvation and victory for Christian believers in a world fraught with opportunities for sin and destruction. “Holy Sonnet X” continues the Christian religious themes of the previous fourteen-line poems; however, instead of maintaining the address to God, “Holy Sonnet X” introduces and directly challenges Death, the personified figure of the inevitable end of life....   [tags: John Donne, Holy Sonnets]

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Analysis Of John Donne 's ' The Bait '

- John Donne’s ‘The Bait’ is essentially, in terms of content, an erotic invitatory masked in a metaphysical, typically abstract - in terms of Donne 's poetic oeuvre - piscatorial conceit, in which the speaking persona analogises men and women with fish and bait, respectively. In this essay, I will be exploring how Donne constructs a multiplicity of meaning throughout the text, with particular focus on the bubbling undercurrents of libido and misogyny, the use of hyperbole, paradox and overtly sexual imagery, and the self-contained, almost oppressively rigid form....   [tags: Poetry, Metaphor, John Donne, Metaphysical poets]

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Batter My Heart By John Donne

- Batter my heart (Holy Sonnet 14) As I read “Batter my heart” I felt I completely understood what John Donne was fiercely passionate about. I had an experience like this when I was 30 years old. The first two lines of the sonnet captured me with his word choice and tempo. He employed action words illustrating the progression of the new Believer: “knock”, God is a gentleman and will request entry into your life; “breathe”, breathe life into me; “shine”, His love, life, and light; “seek to mend”, mend my brokenness....   [tags: John Donne, Metaphysical poets, Holy Sonnets]

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John Donne: The Creator of Metaphysical Poetry

- John Donne is recognized as being the poet who broke the Petrarchan tradition in England and created a new style of poetry: Metaphysical (The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 581, 585-586; TNAEL throughout). Metaphysical poems are not a completely new branch of poetry, but an extension of the point of the Elizabethan tradition (pg. 581, 585-586). “The Sun Rising,” by John Donne, is divided into three stanzas, each ten lines long. The rhyme scheme in each stanza is ABBACDCDEE. Lines one, five, and six are metered in iambic tetrameter, line two is in dimeter, and lines three, four, seven, eight, nine, and ten are in pentameter....   [tags: John Donne, Metaphysical, poetry, Sun Rising,]

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Death in the Life of John Donne

- Death in the Life of John Donne Professor Choi Jae Hun 2006-12-07 MA English Literature 2006201044 Yoon Hyeon Jeong Contents INTRODUCTION 2 I. DEATH OF HIS FAMILY MEMBERS 3 II. MARRIAGE AND HIS WIFE’S DEATH 6 III. HIS OWN DEATH 8 IV. SUICIDAL THOUGHTS 9 CONCLUSION 10 BIBLIOGRAPHY 11 Introduction John Donne is one of the most important poets in English literature. To understand John Donne’s poems better, studying his poetic skills such as symbolism, wit, metaphor, and exaggeration are crucial, but the most important subject, death, in his poems cannot be overlooked....   [tags: John Donne Poetry]

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Explication of John Donne's The Flea

- Explication of John Donne's The Flea John Donne's, "The Flea," is a persuasive poem in which the speaker is attempting to establish a sexual union with his significant other. However, based on the woman's rejection, the speaker twists his argument, making that which he requests seem insignificant. John Donne brings out and shapes this meaning through his collaborative use of conceit, rhythm, and rhyme scheme. In the beginning, Donne uses the flea as a conceit, to represent a sexual union with his significant other....   [tags: John Donne Flea Essays]

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Analysis of the Poem, The Flea by John Donne

- Analysis of the Poem “The Flea” by John Donne      Poets have often used symbols to convey deeper messages that they were either too afraid or felt that normal language lacked the power to express. Often when a symbol is used, the reader digs deeper into the issue more than if the message was simply shot out in the open. These symbols and metaphors can be used to portray beautiful things, or could be used to create a more compelling argument in a more subtle way.      In the poem “The Flea” by John Donne, the speaker uses clever sexual innuendo and metaphors in an attempt to manipulate a certain girl into losing her virginity to him....   [tags: The Flea John Donne]

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Use of Conceit in The Flea, by John Donne

- Use of Conceit in The Flea, by John Donne      John Donne, an English poet and clergyman, was one of the greatest metaphysical poets. His poetry was marked by conceits and lush imagery. The Flea is an excellent example of how he was able to establish a parallel between two very different things. In this poem, the speaker tries to seduce a young woman by comparing the consequences of their lovemaking with those of an insignificant fleabite. He uses the flea as an argument to illustrate that the physical relationship he desires is not in itself a significant event, because a similar union has already taken place within the flea....   [tags: The Flea John Donne]

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John Donne's Love's Alchemy

- John Donne's Love's Alchemy In 'Love's Alchemy,'; John Donne sets up an analogy between the Platonists, who try, endlessly, to discover spiritual love, and the alchemists, who in Donne’s time, tried to extract gold from baser metals. This analogy allows Donne to express his beliefs that such spiritual love does not exist and those who are searching for it are only wasting their time. Donne cleverly uses language that both allows the reader to see the connections between the alchemists and the Platonists and that allows for a more sexual interpretation of the piece....   [tags: John Donne Poetry Poems Analysis]

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Seduction in John Donne's The Flea

- Seduction in John Donne's The Flea Poetry is not only a brilliant form of expression, but also a powerful tool for persuasion. The renowned metaphysical poet John Donne uses the genre for this very purpose in “The Flea,” a work in which he encourages a young woman to have premarital sex with him. Donne backs his argument by referring to a flea that has sucked his own blood as well as his lover’s. In the first stanza Donne assures the woman that sleeping together would be a minor act....   [tags: John Donne Flea Poem Poetic Essays]

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The Flea by John Donne

- The Flea by John Donne “The Flea”, a witty poem of seduction and conceit, taken from John Donne’s “Songs and Sonets” is the poem that I have chosen to compare to “Song”, another poem of John Donne’s where he is passionately pleading with his wife not to be disheartened about his departure abroad. Both poems which belong to “ Songs and Sonets”, written around the time of the 16th century, show that their title suggests they are both short poems, following the traditional form of a sonnet, consisting of fourteen lines....   [tags: The Flea John Donne Songs and Sonnets Essays]

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Critical Analysis of The Indifferent by John Donne

- Critical Analysis of "The Indifferent" by John Donne "The Indifferent" by John Donne is a relatively simple love poem in comparison to his other, more complicated works. In this poem, "he presents a lover who regards constancy as a 'vice' and promiscuity as the path of virtue and good sense" (Hunt 3). Because of Donne's Christian background, this poem was obviously meant to be a comical look at values that were opposite the ones held by Christians. According to Clay Hunt, "['The Indifferent'] is probably quite an early poem because of the simplicity and obviousness of its literary methods, its untroubled gaiety, and its pose of libertinism, which all suggest that Donne wrote [the poem] whe...   [tags: Indifferent John Donne Essays Papaers]

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A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning by John Donne

- “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,” by John Donne explores love through the ideas of assurance and separation. Donne uses vivid imagery to impart his moral themes on his audience. A truer, more refined love, Donne explains comes from a connection at the mind, the joining of two souls as one. Physical presence is irrelevant if a true marriage of the minds has occurred, joining a pair of lovers’ souls eternally. In order to describe the form which Donne gives to true love he chooses to create a scene of separation....   [tags: A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning John Donne]

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Biography of John Donne

- Biography of John Donne John Donne was an English poet and probably the greatest metaphysical poets of all time. He was born in 1572 to a Roman Catholic family in London. His father died when John was young leaving his mother Elisabeth to raise him and his siblings. Throughout Donne’s life his experiences with religion were full of trials and tribulations, something that can be clearly seen in his poetry over time. He remained Catholic early in life while he attended both Oxford and Cambridge Universities....   [tags: Biographies John Donne English Poets Essays]

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Reciprocal love in John Donne's Holy Sonnets

- Reciprocal love in John Donne's Holy Sonnets Holy Sonnet XV deals with the question of reciprocal love that runs throughout Donne’s religious poetry. The Sonnet is an address of the speaker’s mind to the speaker’s soul; it is a meditation on the Trinity and man’s relationship to God. The poem’s form and the multi-layered conflation throughout expound upon the nature of the Trinity. The theme of humility in reciprocal religious love or receiving and understanding God’s glory (as Donne understood it) runs throughout the poem....   [tags: John Donne Holy Sonnets Essays]

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John Donne

- John Donne John Donne had a rich life full of travel, women and religion. Donne was born in 1572 on Bread Street in London. The family was Roman Catholic which was dangerous during this time when Catholicism was being abolished and protestant was taking over. Donne’s farther was an iron monger who died in 1576. At 11 Donne and his younger brother went to university and studied there for three years then he went to Cambridge for a further three years. He left without any degrees because as a Catholic he could not swear the ‘Oath of Supremacy’, which made you swear an oath declaring Henry VIII as head of the Church of England, Donne refused to swear this....   [tags: John Donne Biography Poets Poetry Essays]

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A Structural and Vocabulary Analysis of John Donne's The Flea

- A Structural and Vocabulary Analysis of John Donne's "The Flea" In his poem "The Flea", John Donne shows his mastery in creating a work in which the form and the vocabulary have deliberately overlapping significance. The poem can be analyzed for the prominence of "threes" that form layers of multiple meanings within its three stanzas. In each of the three stanzas, key words can be examined to show (through the use of the OED) how Donne brilliantly chose them because of the various connotations they had to his audience....   [tags: Poem Poet Poetry Essays John Donne Flea]

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John Donne's The Sun Rising

- John Donne's The Sun Rising Critics of John Donne's "The Sun Rising" often note that the poem's displacement of the outside world in favor of two lovers' inner world serves to support its overall theme: the centrality of human love amidst a permanent physical universe. In an essay entitled "John Donne," Achsah Guibbory supports this reading of the poem, stating, "The world of love contains everything of value; it is the only one worth exploring and possessing. Hence the microcosmic world of love becomes larger and more important than the macrocosm" (135)....   [tags: Donne Sun Rising Essays]

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John Donne's The Holy Sonnets

- John Donne's The Holy Sonnets By making many references to the Bible, John Donne's Holy Sonnets reveal his want to be accepted and forgiven by God. A fear of death without God's forgiveness of sins is conveyed in these sonnets. Donne expresses extreme anxiety and fright that Satan has taken over his soul and God won't forgive him for it or his sins. A central theme of healing and forgiveness imply that John Donne, however much he wrote about God and being holy, wasn't such a holy man all of the time and tried to make up for it in his writing....   [tags: Donne Holy Sonnets Religion Essays]

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Death Be Not Proud By John Donne

- Death Be Not Proud by John Donne is a poem about us giving death power over us. John talks to death as a “person” and informs it about its pride. He claims that we hold the power of our thoughts and we shouldn’t allow death to take over our perception of death. The writer portrays us of being subservient to the natural ways of chance. We can not control what happens naturally with death. Instead of us, thinking were victims of death we should think of it more as our destiny. John’s continuous encounters with situations throughout his life have helped shaped this poem....   [tags: Metropolitana di Napoli, Madrid Metro, Sonnet]

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Death, Be Not Proud by John Donne

- In John Donne’s sonnet “Death, Be Not Proud” death is closely examined and Donne writes about his views on death and his belief that people should not live in fear of death, but embrace it. “Death, Be Not Proud” is a Shakespearean sonnet that consists of three quatrains and one concluding couplet, of which I individually analyzed each quatrain and the couplet to elucidate Donne’s arguments with death. Donne converses with death, and argues that death is not the universal destroyer of life. He elaborates on the conflict with death in each quatrain through the use of imagery, figurative language, and structure....   [tags: Sonet, Poetic Analysis]

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Death Be Not Proud by John Donne

- Death, to many people, is something that is feared and unwelcome. These people do not want their lives to end, or are afraid of life after death. Emily Dickinson gives a different perspective in her poem “Because I could not stop for Death”, as does John Donne in his poem, “Death Be Not Proud”. In their poems, death is welcome. Factors such as the way they were raised and their religious beliefs both have an influence on Dickinson’s and Donne’s poems. Emily Dickinson lived from 1830 to 1856 in Amherst, Massachusetts....   [tags: god, religious beliefs]

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Death Is Not Proud, By John Donne

- Everyone is going to die; it is a fact of life. Every living thing on this planet will cease to exist at one point or another. John Donne, Walt Whitman, and Mary Oliver all acknowledge this fact in their poetry, but they go beyond the reality of the situation. In “Death Be Not Proud”, John Donne tells Death that it is a slave and eventually it will not be needed. Walt Whitman says that death does not exist and the soul is immortal in “Song of Myself”. Lastly, in “When Death Comes” Oliver describes a vision of life to avoid fearing death....   [tags: Soul, Life, Immortality, Death]

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The Sun Rising by John Donne

- “The Sun Rising” by John Donne is an aubade all about two lovers getting woken up by the sun when all they want to do is lay in bed all day. The entire poem is the speaker, presumably Donne himself, is talking to the sun and telling him to go away. This poem is broken into three stanzas with a rhyme scheme of ABBACDCDEE. Each of those stanzas represents what Donne is telling the sun to do, which is, to go away, I am stronger than you, and that he and his lover are the center of the world. Donne uses diction throughout all three stanzas to make his three points and to give the overall point of the poem, that love is not affected by time....   [tags: story and character analysis]

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Death Be Not Proud By John Donne

- Poets have used the structured sonnet form to express various ideas and emotions, such as the death, love, and life. In “Death Be Not Proud” by John Donne, a statement on death is given, which does against the common grain. Donne expresses the need to remove the stigma around death and perceives it as inconsequential. Death is not brought up in everyday conversations and people often elude the thought of death when it does come up. Death is feared and dreaded by most people, but Donne veers away from this stigma....   [tags: Sonnet, Shakespeare's sonnets]

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John Donne and British Literature

- John Donne was a very remarkable and well known author throughout British Literature. He led a very interesting life from his career as a preacher and author even to his personal life. Donne faced a life of hardship, tragedy, and secrets. Although through all his endeavors he managed to write famous manuscripts, sermons, and poems. At the time he wrote these works, John Donne’s fames didn’t really occur significantly until after his death. From a young age he was a very well educated man, and excelled onto college, obtained a job, and established a variety of careers....   [tags: biography, preacher and author]

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The Flea By John Donne

- Sex is a taboo subject in this day and age to speak about however poet John Donne does not shy away from the topic in his writing. John Donne approaches sex through his poem “The Flea”. “The Flea” published after the death of John Donne in 1663 is known as an erotic metaphysical poem. A poem that focuses on the use of extended metaphors and put emphasis on the words rather than lyrical quality. Even though it contains an unresolved ending, “The Flea” is a lighthearted poem that showcases John Donne uses of creative intelligence of language and tone in the voice of the narrator....   [tags: Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior]

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The Flea By John Donne

- John Donne’s “The Flea” details the attempts of a lover to convince his partner of the insignificance of physical love through conceit. The desperate lover hopes to woo ahesitant woman to have sex with him because physical love means nothing. Donne utilizes biblical allusions through symbolism and slant rhyme as the speaker builds and rebuilds his crooked case for the unimportance of sex. When the action of the poem shifts, the speaker’s argument shifts accordingly. The flea transforms into a symbol of the conscience that is the main obstacle to the physical love that the speaker seeks....   [tags: Poetry, Rhyme, Carpe diem, Marriage]

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John Donne's Meditation 17

- Life for people today is full of technology that helps extend our lives. It connects us and keeps us together as a whole. The meaning of life is a philosophical question concerning the purpose of existence. Not everyone in the world is ready to face death, even though we all have to hit the hay at some point in our lives. We humans believe we are invincible whether we mean to think that or not. Perhaps one of John Donne’s most famous written works is called “Meditation 17” and it highlights on death, society, and isolation....   [tags: the island, death, society, isolation]

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Johne Donne's the Flea

- “The Flea” John Donne observes a typical bar, every Saturday night sweat drenched bodies emitting alcohol and pheromones from every pore, exchange conversation, pleasantries, and yes even sex (perhaps not directly in view but certainly eluded to). Is this animalistic, barbaric behavior acceptable. Should sex be taken so lightheartedly. Or do we take it too seriously, guarding sex like it was the Holy Grail, or the secret to life itself. These questions may be to deep and pointed for most to approach, yet John Donne in his poem “The Flea” wades through them like the kiddy pool....   [tags: John Donne]

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The Poetry of Andrew Marvell and John Donne

- The Poetry of Andrew Marvell and John Donne The seventeenth century was an era of beautiful poetry. Two poets in particular, Andrew Marvell and John Donne, wrote carpe diem poetry full of vivid imagery and metaphysical conceits. Each conveyed the message of "living for the now." This message can be clearly seen in the poems "To his Coy Mistress" by Marvell and Donne’s "Flea." By using clever metaphors and meter, the poems not only are symbolic, but have almost a physical aspect to them. Though both poems take a similar approach, it is Marvell that writes the more persuasive one, reaching deep into the soul to win his object of affection....   [tags: Poets Poet Marvell Donne Essays]

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John Donne

- John Donne was born to John and Elizabeth Donne of Bread Street, London, in 1572. In his early years, John Donne was a wild lover and sensual writer. After finding Christ, his writing style changed from sexual to spiritual. Despite the fact that Donne’s earlier poetry was focused around lustful sensations, his later works utilized biblical illusions, proclaiming his newly found belief in God. Early in Donne’s life, his brother was incarcerated “for giving sanctuary to a proscribed Catholic priest” and met his death through fever while serving his time (Smith)....   [tags: Poet, Biography]

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Death By Emily Dickinson And John Donne

- According to Google, death is the action or fact of dying or being killed. This definition is too vague in the literature world and needs to be broken down and explained. Death is a topic in literature that is used more often than none. Writers use the theme of “Death” to add imagery and symbolism to their work. Death can be personified by an eerie black figure, or by a “holy” regular person. People have different interpretations of death; some think of it in a pleasant way, and others think it’s a gruesome event that occurs in a dark manner....   [tags: Death, Afterlife, Life, Soul]

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John Donne: An Influential English Poet

- John Donne, one of the greatest English poets and preachers of the 1600’s, greatly impacted the writing field through his works. In the first half of 1572 (actual date is unknown) he was born in London to John Donne, a merchant, and Elizabeth Heywood Donne, the daughter of the poet and playwright John Heywood. His father died when Donne was about four years old. His younger brother, Henry, also died in John Donne’s early life. John Donne was raised in a Catholic family. Both of his parents were devout Roman Catholics....   [tags: Preacher, Poetry, Sermons]

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The Broken Heart a Poem by John Donne

- ... He was a man of contradictions: As a minister in the Anglican Church, Donne possessed a deep spirituality that pairs his thoughts and feelings throughout his lifetime. Donne also possessed a sensual outlook on life, sensation, and experience. He is both a successful religious poet and a great suggestive poet, and perhaps no other poet successfully amalgamated and expressed such incompatible, mutually disagreeing passions. In his best poems, Donne commixes the discourses of the physical and the spiritual; over the course of his lifetime, Donne gave sublime expression to both worlds....   [tags: feelings, love, catholics]

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John Donne's 'A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning'

- John Donne; A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning John Donne (1572-1631) was one of England's greatest and most creative poets. He worked as secretary for Sir Thomas Edgerton, the Keeper of the Great Seal of England. At that time, Donne fell in love with Anne More (1584-1617) who was the niece of Edgerton's second wife. Edgerton and Ann's father, Sir George More, who was Chancellor of the Garter, strongly disagreed with them getting married. However, Donne married Anne in 1601 when she turned seventeen....   [tags: Poetry Analysis]

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Analysis of John Donne's Poem, The Flea

- The Flea John Donne’s poems are similar in their content. They usually point out at same topics like love, lust, sex and religion; only they are dissimilar in the feelings they express. These subjects reflect the different stages of his life: the lust of his youth, the love of his married middle age, and the piety of the latter part of his life. His poem,’ The Flea’ represents the restless feeling of lust during his youthful days but it comes together with a true respect for women through the metaphysical conceit of the flea as a church in the rhythm of the sexual act....   [tags: Poetry, Poem Analysis]

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John Donne's A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning

- Gender norms and ideals go as far as humanity goes; scientific and religious histories of mankind both accept the different roles of men and women in a household. During the age of cavemen, women used to do the gardening and cooking while men were in charge of hunting and providing for the family; which is similar to Adam and Eve’s life after being cast away from Eden. These norms and ideals have continued and altered throughout history and some still exist. The Baroque age was not an exception to these ideals....   [tags: Baroque Gender Norms]

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Holy Sonnet XVIII by John Donne

- I will analyze John Donne’s Holy Sonnet XVIII. This sonnet is a variant of an Italian Sonnet with a volta occurring, unusually, at line 11 instead of the standard at line 9. The theme of this sonnet is the search for the true church of Christ among the various conflicting denominations of Christianity. Significant words, metaphysical conceit, metrics, sound patterns and tone come together to develop and clarify the theme. I will analyze the sonnet in three parts, beginning with the octave followed by the first two lines of the sestet and finally, the last four lines of the sestet....   [tags: christianity, italian sonnet, loneliness]

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John Donne: Quixotic yet Sacrosanct

- Love and religion are two of the most common topics of poetry, even though many of Donne’s poems are either on love or religion, two different topic, they are connected thru the continuous use of devices such as allusions, metaphors, and puns; providing a bond for each poem yet each for a different context. “The Flea,” “Holy Sonnet VII”, and “A Hymn to God the Father” each have distinct themes, but find common ground by the use of common literary devices. Donne consistently uses allusions, usually biblical, throughout his poems....   [tags: Poem Analysis, Literay Devices, Religious Elements]

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Elements of Plato in John Donne's The Good Morrow

- Elements of Plato in John Donne's The Good Morrow There are clear Platonic elements in Donne's "The Good Morrow." The idea that Donne and his lady are halves that complete each other is traceable to Plato's theory of love. Lines 7 and 8 of the poem refer to the Platonic World of Ideas: the lady is presented as the Idea of Beauty, of which all earthly beauty is but an imperfect reflection. My argument, however, is that Plato's cave allegory and his World of Ideas are integral to a full understanding of this highly complex poem....   [tags: Donne Good Morrow Essays]

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Marvell´s To His Coy Mistress and Donne´s The Flea

- Sex, sexuality, and the identity of those taking part in it are compelling in the approaches taken in Andrew Marvell’s ‘To His Coy Mistress’ and John Donne’s ‘The Flea’. Both men come about their intentions with their lovers honestly, making it clear that sex is the ultimate objective. However, both men have their own reasons for feeling the need to express their feelings for their lovers through sex. John Donne ultimately believes that the intermixing of their ‘love fluids’ to make a child will be the ultimate testament of their love....   [tags: John Donne, Andre Marvell, sexuality, identity]

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Vulnerability in the Works of John Donne

- Free Essay on John Donne - A Journey Through Vulnerability John Donne uses poetry to explore his own identity, express his feelings, and most of all, he uses it to deal with the personal experiences occurring in his life. Donne's poetry is a confrontation or struggle to find a place in this world, or rather, a role to play in a society from which he often finds himself detached or withdrawn. This essay will discuss Donne's states of mind, his views on love, women, religion, his relationship with God; and finally how the use of poetic form plays a part in his exploration for an identity and salvation....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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The Sun Rising by John Donne

- The Sun Rising by John Donne "The Sun Rising" by John Donne uses figurative, rhetorical and hyperbole techniques to demonstrate the displacement of the outside world in favor of two lovers' inner world and how the sun fulfils its duties by revolving around their bedroom. Donne uses figurative language throughout the poem. The first stanza compares the sun to a "Busy old fool" (1) and "Through windows, and through curtains call on us?" (3) is figurative language for eyes. A wink allows the sun to come into the lovers' inner world....   [tags: Poetry]

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Analysis of Flea by John Donne

- The Flea The narrator in The Flea is a youthful man trying to convince a young woman to give her virginity to him. He tries to do this by comparing their relationship to a flea that is in the room. The flea bites them both and Donne explains to her that this is symbolic of both of their worlds combining into one. He says that the flea is now the realm of love, lust, and marriage. At first this poem seems to be just about love, commitment from a male to a female, who says no his lustful desires....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Sexuality in John Donne's The Flea

- A Reading of John Donne's 'The Flea' It is common to ascribe to Donne the status of archetypal logical poet- a man whose works are tightly crafted, confident, and certain in their application of metaphor and analogy. True enough, Donne’s poem seems to suggest a certain self-security: we see a tight, predictable rhyme scheme, and an ordered structure. There is also arguably a wealth of rhetorical resources - Donne does not shy away from using the lexis of the military (“triumph’st”), the medical (“two bloods…mingled”) or even the religious (“cloysterd”, “sacrilege”)....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Explication of John Donne's The Flea

- On the surface, John Donne’s poem “The Flea” dramatizes the conflict between two people on the issue of premarital sex, however, under the surface, the poem uses religious imagery to seduce the woman into having sex. The speaker in this poem is a man, who is strategically trying to convince a woman to have premarital sex with him through the conceit based on a flea, however, the coy lady has thus far yielded to his lustful desires. The speaker’s argument has the form of logic, which contradicts to its outrageous content....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Religious Agenda of John Donne and Francis Bacon

- The Religious Agenda of John Donne and Francis Bacon Discuss the significance of religious belief in writing you have studied on the course. Introduction The Renaissance period was marked with bouts of religious change, from the Protestant Reformation in Germany to the formation of the Church of England. Much of the literature published during the Renaissance was a reaction to these constant changes – the works of John Donne and Francis Bacon are no different. Donne and Bacon were prominent writers of their time....   [tags: Religion in Literature, Theology]

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Poem Analysis of Meditation 17 by John Donne

- It is quite feasible to state that poetry at its finest is a dazzling and expressive art of words. A poem not only can expose the diplomatic beliefs of societies, but can also articulate passions and sentiments of the author to whom the poem belongs. One of the many fine poems that have been prevalent among the study of literature that is irrefutably powerful is Meditation 17 by John Donne. This poetic essay exposes John Donne’s opinions and beliefs on humanity, and covers much cogitation from religion all the way to death....   [tags: social issues, belief]

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The Poem A Valediciton : Forbidding Mourning By John Donne

- A poem is a piece of writing that partakes of the nature of both speech and song that is nearly always rhythmical, and usually metaphorical. More often than not poems are written about love. Authors talk deeply about love gone wrong, advice when in love, and the over powering feeling and emotions of being in love. Love is magical, when to people bond physically, mentally, and emotionally, giving all that you are to someone for them to appreciate and love all your flaws and imperfections, that’s beautiful....   [tags: Love, Sonnet, Poetry, Metaphysical poets]

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The Writings of John Donne

- The 17th century opened with a generation of great social change which culminated in the eventual execution of King Charles I in 1649. This created an atmosphere of conflict that permeates much of the literature of the period. The writings of John Donne are rife with this conflict, reflecting in their content a view of love and women radically and cynically altered from that which preceding generations of poets had handed down. John Donne's view of love deviated greatly from the Medieval philosophy of courtly love, which had been expressed in poetry handed down from the sonnets of such poetic giants as Sidney and Petrarch....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Uncertainty in John Donne Poetry

- Poetry of the seventeenth century is among some of the best ever written, however, there is more uncertainty when dealing with particular subjects. The topics, for the most part, are more serious and there is the impression that the poets are earnestly uncertain about their choices. The poets themselves do not want to make any definite lines between what they believe and what could be the reality. John Donne's poems discussing women and religion are among the most noticeable examples of the deliberate use of ambiguity in seventeenth-century poetry....   [tags: Poetry]

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The Rising Sun and Death be not Proud by John Donne

- ... He extends this metaphor throughout the poem. In the second last line of the poem he says to death: “One short sleepe past, wee wake eternally.” (13). Line 13 completely defeats the purpose of death; it even redefines the word. The speaker is telling death that we will wake up from the sleep of death and experience eternal life. On the dark topic of death, Donne manages to shines a light on humanity on it. The lesson taught in the poem is that there is no need to fear death, because “...Death shall be no more, death thou shalt die!” (14)....   [tags: elizabethan era, sonnets]

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The Flea - John Donne

- John Donne and an Analysis of "The Flea" John Donne was born on Bread Street, London, in 1572. His family was very rich but they were Roman Catholic, not the best group to be a part of at his time, in England. He studied three years at the University of Oxford and three years at Cambridge. He never got a degree because he refused to take the oath of supremacy at graduation time. He then studied law and was on his way to be a diplomat. He wrote a book of poems, Satires, after his brother died of fever in prison after offering sanctuary to a proscribed catholic priest....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Sexual Meaning in John Donne's Poem, The Flea

- Following a unique poetic language of the Renaissance, John Donne's ‘The Flea' is a poem illustrating the metaphor of a flea to represent the sexual act and relations between a man and woman. Portrayed through language, imagery, and structure John Donne's poem is one of conceit and seduction, as the speaker (assumed to be a man) follows a consistent pattern of persuasion to have premarital sex with a woman. Written during the 17th century, John Donne utilizes an unconventional genre in his poem, demeaning and objectifying the female sex....   [tags: Poetry, Poem Analysis]

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John Donne's The Sun Rising

- John Donne's "The Sun Rising" In his poem, "The Sun Rising," Donne immerses the reader into his transmuted reality with an apostrophe to the "busy old fool, unruly sun" that "through curtains" calls upon him, seizing him from the bliss which "no season knows." This bliss, a passionate love, stimulates him to reinvent reality within the confines of his own mind, a wishful thinking from which he does not readily depart, much like a sleepy child clings to the consequences of a dream. In his address to the sun, he bids "the saucy, pedantic wretch" "go chide late schoolboys, and sour prentices," resembling a petulant youth imploring for more time to slumber....   [tags: Sun Rising Essays]

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The Flea by John Donne

- The Flea by John Donne In the poem "The Flea", by John Donne, the speaker uses a peculiar analogy in order to persuade his beloved to engage in premarital intercourse with him. The poem is composed of three stanzas that tell a story in chronological order about a flea that has sucked the blood of the two subjects. It tells the reader how the speaker attempts to persuade his beloved not to kill the flea because it is their marriage bed and then tells of how the woman still kills the flea but how the speaker uses that to take his argument one step further and explain how since it is so easy and guilt-free to kill the flea, the same could be said of her going to b...   [tags: Papers]

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William Shakespeare, John Donne, And Mary Wroth

- Perhaps the most admirable quality of a poet is their ability to develop and combined ideas, images, metaphors, and symbols while uniquely interpreting these literary devices to reflect their own perspective. Poetic works produced during the seventeenth century were fundamentally rooted in the cultural and intellectual movements of the time, the renaissance during the Elizabethan Era. Seventeenth-century poems contributed unique insights into cultural life but they also positively influence the portrayal of cultural values....   [tags: Poetry, Sonnet, Ben Jonson, Iambic pentameter]

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The Flea by John Donne

- The Flea by John Donne The situation described in the poem is the narrator trying to persuade his girlfriend to sleep with him. Bearing in mind the social context of the poem, the girl is going to need quite a lot of persuading. This is where the flea comes in. The idea of sex being like a flea is sustained throughout the poem thus making it a sustained metaphor. In the sixteen hundreds, fleas were just a common fact of life. Everybody had them, even rich people. I think it is quite a clever persuasive device to compare something that was such a huge thing in those days, to something which is just a part of everyday life that everyone had to deal with....   [tags: Papers]

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Analysis Of John Donne 's ' A Broken Heart '

- The Speaker’s Changes in Attitudes in “A Broken Heart” In “A Broken Heart,” John Donne reveals the speaker’s unusual attitude toward love through language, imagery, and form. The speaker regards love as a relentless, powerful, and cruel monster that transcends human control. Personification and dramatic monologue help the reader to understand the speaker’s warped perspective of love. Meter, rhyme scheme and pattern also emphasize the unstable tone in each octave. After the first two stanzas, the speaker’s attitude shifts from exaggerated rage to withdrawn grief....   [tags: Poetry, Love, Meter, Poetic form]

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Analysis Of John Donne 's ' The Great Chain Of Being '

- Obedience and disobedience were implicated themes in Renaissance Era poetry, whether the acts of such were toward man in John Donne’s work or toward God in John Milton’s. The concepts of obedience and disobedience can only make sense with a structural ranking or scale of entities. “The Great Chain of Being” is fundamental in the epic poem of Paradise Lost, as well as other poetry of the period. The beings and objects that held the most value were signified at the top of the chain, while the least valued were depicted at the bottom....   [tags: Adam and Eve, Paradise Lost, Garden of Eden]

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Devotions by John Donne and They Are My Friends by Margaret Atwood

- So similar and yet so different, is the perfect way to describe the two literacy pieces, “Devotions” by John Donne and “They Are My Friends” by Margaret Atwood. “They Are My Friends” is a story that revolves around the protagonist and her friends, and the author uses this friendship to convey a message to the reader, that centers on being alone. “Devotions” is a quote that discusses about mankind as a whole, and the values of being surrounded by people who care, by using countries as metaphors. These two literacy pieces discuss about similar topics, which contradict and support each other in certain aspects....   [tags: literary piece comparison]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' Salvation Anxiety ' By John Donne

- Thousands of cancer patients, or any terminally ill patients, wish for life in the end, nevertheless for Vivian, who states, “It is not my intention to give away the plot; but I think I die at the end” (Edson), she knows that may not happen for her. Wit’s conclusion has a great deal to say of peaceful death and salvation and is connected to that theme of “Salvation Anxiety” since Vivian is not afraid of her cancer, Vivian 's peaceful death, and Jason and Susie 's reaction to Vivian 's death. Primarily, while Vivian does not truly come out and state if she is religious or not, she makes supply hints though out the play that she may not be religious and she truly fears the unknown journey of d...   [tags: Health care, Patient, Health care provider, Fear]

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Analysis Of John Donne, Emily Dicks, And Michael Obi

- In this paper I will argue about the points where John Donne, Emily Dicks, and Michael Obi are struggling with their faith. The speaker in Holy Sonnet 14 struggles with not deserving to have a relationship with God because of sin. Emily Dickson fights with if there is an afterlife, if it is real, and can I belong in there (Poem 501). Michael Obi struggles with whole ideas of religion and remaining to look to the past since he is all about the looking forward (Death Men’s Path). The themes that are underlines is the desire to reconnect with God, believing in a God, but with some doubts, and completely not wanting a relationship with God at all....   [tags: Madrid Metro, Metropolitana di Napoli]

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Analysis of Donne's The Bait and Marlowe's Passionate Shepherd to His Lover

- Love, an extremely and unsurprisingly popular topic among writers in every time period and corner of the world, is the central subject of two similar, yet contradicting literary works – “The Passionate Shepard to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe and “The Bait” by John Donne, respectively. Each author masterfully utilizes imagery, but in different ways to achieve two different purposes. Marlowe’s idealistic vision of what love should be is countered by Donne’s rather cynical realism. Both works begin with an identical first line that is followed by a line that Donne alters from Marlowe’s original line....   [tags: John Donne Christopher Marlowe]

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John Donne Holy Sonnets

- John Donne Death is a very complicated subject that people view very differently in different situations. In John Donne’s Holy Sonnets, he writes about death in Meditations X and XVII. Both meditations use many similar rhetorical devices and appeals, but the tones of the meditations are very disparate. Donne’s different messages in Meditations X and XVII convey tones of defiance and acquiescence towards death, respectively. His apparent change of attitude towards death could be accounted for by his differing life situations while he was writing the meditations: mid-life, and near-death....   [tags: essays research papers]

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John Donne's Sonnet 14

- John Donne's poetry reflects many things about him as a poet. Mainly, that his poetry reflects his character make-up as he writes the poem. In the later years of his life, he entered into a religious stage that he continued with until his death in 1631. Sonnet 14 is an example of his religious period, where he is "besieged" and asks God to come into his life in a very real way. His use of parallelism, powerful diction and syntax, and paradox presents thoughts on this subject in an umatched way and stresses the depth of his feelings in this sonnet....   [tags: Poetry]

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John Donne's The Indifference

- John Donne's "The Indifference" is a love poem that can be interpreted in a number of ways. Not only is the meaning of the text debatable, but the audience for which the poem was intended can be argued as well. The language Donne uses leaves room for the reader's imagination and intellect to take over and decide to whom he is talking and why. The author is writing to a specific audience for a specific reason, trying to convey his point through his verse. While not all people agree as to whom this poem is intended for or whom the speaker is actually talking to, I have a good understanding as to what Donne is trying to accomplish by writing "The Indifference" and whom the voice of the...   [tags: Poets, Poetry, Prose]

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John Donne: Quixotic yet Sacrosanct

- Love and religion are two of the most common topics of poetry. Many of Donne’s poems are on one of these two very different topics, his works are connected through the continuous use of devices such as allusion, metaphor, and pun; providing a bond for each poem, yet a different context for each one. “The Flea,” “Holy Sonnet VII,” and “A Hymn to God the Father” each have distinct themes, but find common ground by the use of common literary devices. “The Flea” is a carnal poem where the speaker tries to convince his lover to be inclined to him....   [tags: Literature]

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The Flea by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell

- The Flea by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell "The Flea" by John Donne is written in the 17th century as is "To his coy mistress" by Andrew Marvell. This we can see by the language used which was typical of that period in time "apt to kill me" and "yea" which are taken from the flea. Both poems also speak of virginity being very important, especially before marriage because if a woman had lost her "maidenhead" before, the husband would have the right to leave her without the need for a divorce....   [tags: Flea donne Marvell Mistress Essays]

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John Donne

- Essay on John Donne John Donne, a master at his work, was born some time during the year 1572. The exact date of his birth date is unknown. Donne accomplished many and experienced many things in his life. He got married secretly, went to prison, and wrote many poems that are world known John Donne attended both Oxford and Cambridge universities, and he also attended Lincoln's Inn. At Lincoln's Inn Donne studied law, but never practiced it there after. Donne did not get degrees at any of the universities that he attended, but he did obtain a mind full of knowledge....   [tags: essays research papers]

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John Donne

- John Donne John Donne was a writer with exceptional talent and had an intense feeling about all that he wrote. In the beginning of his life he was a charming man who , was accepted by royalty because of his personality and writing ability. Having been employed by one of the queen’s highly regarded men , he worked and associated with the high class royalty. Donne’s life and job lead him to meet and eventually marry his employer’s daughter. This couple caused scandal due to the classifications of the two people....   [tags: essays research papers]

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