Your search returned over 400 essays for "Jean-Paul Sartre Nausea"
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Comparing Albert Camus' The Stranger (The Outsider) and Jean-Paul Sartre's Nausea

- Lack of Order in Albert Camus' The Stranger (The Outsider) and Jean-Paul Sartre's Nausea   Nausea, by Jean-Paul Sartre, and The Stranger, by Albert Camus, refuse to impose order on their events by not using psychology, hierarchies, coherent narratives, or cause and effect. Nausea refuses to order its events by not inscribing them with psychology or a cause for existence, and it contrasts itself with a text by Balzac that explains its events. Nausea resists the traditional strategy of including the past to predict a character's future....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Nasea by Jean Paul Sartre

- In Jean Paul Sartre’s 1938 novel, Nausea, the protagonist, Antoine Roquentin questions the existence and purpose of objects and himself. He ultimately discovers the answer to be nothingness for one creates their own meanings and connections to the past and reality. Roquentin is a victim of self-deception and through the narrative point of view and word choice conveyed, it is clear that he lies to himself that he must exist in the present to escape the meaningless past. Roquentin speaks in the first person narrative, which conveys his attachment and curiosity about the link between time and existence....   [tags: self-deception, antoine roquentin]

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The Life of Jean-Paul Sartre

- Existentialism could be defined as a philosophical theory that focuses on the individual person being a free and responsible person who determines his or her own development through acts of will. Existentialism is a thesis that has been discussed by some of the greatest philosophical minds ever to live. Minds such as Kierkegaard and Nietzsche all had their own view on what existentialism was and major impact on the development of this thesis. Each of these philosophies played a huge influence on a great mind that would come later on in history....   [tags: philosophy, existentialism]

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Jean-Paul Sartre and Our Responsibility for Teaching History

- Jean-Paul Sartre and Our Responsibility for Teaching History ABSTRACT: Historical research was one of Jean-Paul Sartre's major concerns. Sartre's biographical studies and thought indicate that history is not only a field in which you gather facts, events, and processes, but it is a worthy challenge which includes a grave personal responsibility: my responsibility to the dead lives that preceded me. Sartre's writings suggest that accepting this responsibility can be a source of wisdom. Few historians, however, view history as transcending the orderly presenting and elucidating of facts, events, and processes....   [tags: Philosophy Education Research Papers]

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Comparing Common Characteristics of The Trial and Nausea

- Common Characteristics of The Trial and Nausea I am happy I took the opportunity to explore Jean-Paul Sartre's Nausea and Franz Kafka's The Trial. These novels are considered by many to be two of the definitive works representing Existentialist philosophy. Many other authors have dealt with the subject of existence in the form of a novel, most notably Samuel Beckett (Molloy) and Albert Camus (A Happy Death). Existentialist ideas have even slipped into the works of authors such as Ernest Hemingway and Joseph Heller....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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The Stranger (The Outsider), Nausea, and Death on the Installment Plan

- The Stranger (The Outsider), Nausea, and Death on the Installment Plan        The Stranger, by Albert Camus, Nausea, by Jean-Paul Sartre, and Death on the Installment Plan, by Louis-Ferdinand Celine, all contrast themselves with internal texts that fail to represent the world competently. The Stranger includes the prosecutor's narrative of the murders as an incompetent text by refusing to support the motives he assigns. It contrasts itself with the prosecutor's narrative in view of the excessive language of the prosecutor versus the simple reporting of Meursault....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Comparing Existentialism in The Trial and Nausea

- Existentialism in The Trial and Nausea   The Trial and Nausea   Webster's Dictionary defines Existentialism as a "philosophic doctrine of beliefs that people have absolute freedom of choice and that the universe is absurd, with an emphasis on the phenomena of anxiety and alienation." As Existentialism was coming to the foreground of the philosophical world during the 1940's, a group of Existentialist philosophers became well-known public figures in America. Their philosophies were commonly discussed in magazines, and their concepts of man's ultimate freedom of choice were quite intriguing to readers....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Jean Of Jean Paul Sartre

- ... As we are condemned to be free we are always acting as Sartre had said. As Kant insisted the things that we do, we cannot use the excuse of having causes of why it things happened. Our decisions and our actions are souely upon us. As humans we are always making decisions. As a human myself, I am making decisions about my life every single day. We make decisions whether they are rational or irrational. We are stated that we must make decisions but it is not stated that you have to make every decision that steps in front of you....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism]

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Existentialism, By Jean Paul Sartre

- In life humans have to make several different choices based on different circumstances, some decisions you make you regret and some you do not. Many kids parent encourage their kids to go to college for a better life but sometimes a child does not always listen to what their parents want, in the end hurting their parent’s feelings. In the Continental Ethics Reader Sartre describes four ways in which the student is forsaken. Focusing on the four different ways hoping to explain how one is forsaken, what does this mean for humanity and whether I agree or disagree with the four different ways....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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`` No Exit `` By Jean Paul Sartre

- ... The second, deeper level is that hell is other people’s presence and how they remind one of how inadequate their own behavior has been. The one act, existentialist play, “No Exit,” exemplifies this perfectly by setting up three characters, Garcin, Estelle, and Inez, to prove that hell is other people on two different levels. Garcin is in hell. He knows it and he accepts it. He was a terrible person while living. He beat his wife and brought his mistress home often. While telling the story of why he is in hell, he states that, “Night after night I came home blind drunk, stinking of wine and women.” (24) He was hell for his wife, even if she never shed a tear....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism, No Exit]

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David Hume And Jean Paul Sartre

- ... Soren K. belief of his family being cursed brought upon the disruption of the relationship between his father, Michael Kierkegaard and himself. Also in addition, it led to the broken engagement with Regine Olsen. At 27 years old, Soren Kierkegaard was engaged to Regine Olsen, who was only 18 at the time, until Soren decided to call it off one year later. There were exactly two reasons as to why Soren decided to call off his engagement with Regine Olsen even though, both of them loved each other....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism]

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No Exit By Jean Paul Sartre

- In the theatrical play No Exit, by Jean-Paul Sartre, is set in 1944 and has an existential theme popularized by Sartre. This play describes the mysterious adventure of three characters, Garcin, Inez, and Estelle, who are trapped in a room by the Valet. By being trapped in this room, they are forced to confess their crimes. Annette Petrusso, author of “No Exit” an article written about the play, refers to the characters as cowards, or how they lack courage. Even though Petrusso makes a good point about how all of the characters show a cowardly trait, she leaves out the fact that each character becomes less of a coward throughout the play just by being trapped with each other....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism, No Exit, Coward]

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Existentialism, By Jean Paul Sartre

- “Existentialism in Humanism” is a speech given by Jean-Paul Sartre given in 1946. Existentialism is a philosophy that states the existence of the individual person determines their own development through the acts of free will. Basically, this means that a person is free to decide and manipulate the course their life will take. They can control their reactions to situations, and cause other actions to occur. The argument made by Sartre is essentially nature vs nurture. The point Sartre argues is that existence precedes essence....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism, Human, Religion]

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Existentialism, By Jean Paul Sartre

- Existentialism Comparison Essay Existentialism is a philosophy, which revolves around the beliefs humans create themselves. Every person has his own view on existentialism and displays it differently. An existentialist in search of his meaning of life to end meaningless existence. Jean-Paul Sartre in his story The Wall attempts to demonstrate the conditions due to which a protagonist loses himself and becomes an existential after a deposited psychological trauma, but afterwards finds his new meaning....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Meaning of life]

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Jean Paul Sartre's No Exit And Its Existentialist Themes

- Jean Paul Sartre's No Exit And Its Existentialist Themes I would like to take this opportunity to discuss Jean Paul Sartre's philosophy and it's integration into his play "No Exit". Embedded within the character interactions are many Sartrean philosophical themes. Personal attributes serve to demonstrate some of the more dominant ideas in Sartre's writings. Each of the three characters in the play show identifiable characteristics of sexual perversion, bad faith, and interactions of consciousness.This play takes an interesting setting, that of the afterlife....   [tags: No Exit Jean Paul Sartre Essays Existentialism]

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Analysis Of Jean Paul 's ' Hell '

- No Exit is a play that I remeber seeing in compition in High school. Once I saw the name I instanly was tranported back to watching my fellow speech class mates practicing the play for compition. What do the damn have to say to the damned. No Exit seems to answer half of that question. Jean-Paul Sartre is a 1944 existentialist play writer. He explores peoples own private hell and poses the question what happens if you are in a room with no exit in hell what then. Jean-Paul Satre’s version of Hell in No Exit is full of drama, irony and humor....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism, No Exit]

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Sartre 's Ethics Of Ambiguity

- Simone de Beauvoir 's ethics is exceptionally complex. In The Ethics of Ambiguity, her ideas of "vagueness," "exposure," "common flexibility," "moral opportunity"-taking their takeoffs from Jean-Paul Sartre-interweave to frame unpredictable groups of argumentation. To these conceivable reasons we may include the basic origination of Beauvoir as only Sartre 's followers and the slow decay of existentialist scholars in academia. Sartre’s ethics, his Being and Nothingness, and the advancement of his thinking are tough subjects to handle....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Sartre 's Theory Of Existentialism

- It was in the 19th centuries where a French writer Jean-Paul Sartre who popularized the concept of existentialism during his play No Exit. The play was published in 1943. Sartre explained Existentialism, which states in the belief that life has no meaning. Reynolds stated that, “People should be responsible for themselves rather than make excuses for the occurrences in their life, the belief that humans have free will” ( ). Each is separate from all other individuals, so each person has the power to place himself in the position he wishes, that every individual is responsible for his actions....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Psychology]

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Jean-Paul Sartre: Conscience to the World

- Jean-Paul Sartre: Conscience to the World At the time of his death on the fifteenth of April, 1980, at the age of seventy-four, Jean-Paul Sartre’s greatest literary and philosophical works were twenty-five years in the past. Although the small man existed in the popular mind as the politically inconsistent champion of unpopular causes and had spent the last seven years of his life in relative stagnation, his influence was still great enough to draw a crowd of over fifty thousand people – admirers or otherwise – for his funeral procession....   [tags: Biography Sartre Essays]

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Existentialism, By Jean Paul Sartre

- Existentialism is one of the most argued subject of Philosophy. Existentialism is the belief that having awareness, free will, and personal responsibility of the world that individual may obtain a view unique to the average person. This meaning within a world that intrinsically has none of its own. Existentialism started to appear in early Buddhist and Christian writing. In Jean-Paul Sartre’s eyes Existentialism means in the beginning of the human life humans are nothing. It is everyone 's individual choice to make something of themselves....   [tags: Meaning of life, Human, Existentialism, Jews]

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Sartre 's Moral Relativism And Existentialism

- ... Thus, the idea of ‘God’, a being whose existence entails purpose, seems absurd to Sartre. The one being that satisfies the first principle of existentialism is man: “Man first exists: he materializes in the world, encounters himself, and only afterward defines himself” (22). This simply implies that a human being is thrown into this world without any essence, meaning, or characteristics. For example, if someone is to be deemed truthful, he or she is truthful not because he or she told the truth once or twice, but he or she is defined as truthful because he or she habitually tells the truth and lives in such a way that is deemed to be truthful....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Ontology]

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Jean Paul Sartre

- Discussion Most western Philosophies and monotheistic traditions base the creation of man as a design of god. God is the primary artisan that is the creator for all, and god’s conception of man is conceived before the creation of man. For Sartre this means that because god created humanity through a conception, it must mean that we are all created to that conception and are created with a purpose, or as Sartre defines human nature (Sartre, p.206-207). As an atheistic existentialist Sartre sees a problem with a notion of a divine creator, as this would mean that our essence precedes our existence....   [tags: Philosophy, God, Creation]

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Jean Paul Sartre : French Activist

- Throughout the post World War Two era, many people became homeless in countries such as France, Poland, Belgium and other territories of war because of the economic collapse. A Cold War also emerged between the two rising power countries in the world, the USSR and the United States. The emergence of the United Nations, which was a council where the countries of the world could get together so they could discuss global issues, had given some hope to those but only on the surface. In France specifically, there were homeless people all over because of economic weakness, little military power because of Hitler’s occupation of France, and most importantly the corrupted psychology of the people....   [tags: Writer, Critic, Political Activist]

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Title Analysis of No Exit by Jean Paul Sartre

- Title Analysis of No Exit by Jean Paul Sartre Since its first publication in 1944 in French, the play Huis Clos by Jean-Paul Sartre has been translated into numerous languages around the world. The English translations have seen many different titles, including In Camera, No Way Out, and Dead End. The most common and accepted of all the title translation, however, is No Exit. The translation is derived from the literal meanings of the title words in French: “huis” means “door” and “clos” means “closed”....   [tags: Sartre Play Analysis]

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Jean-Paul Sartre and Radical Freedom

- Jean-Paul Sartre claims that there can be no human nature, or essence, without a God to conceive of it. This claim leads Sartre to formulate the idea of radical freedom, which is the idea that man exists before he can be defined by any concept and is afterwards solely defined by his choices. Sartre presupposes this radical freedom as a fact but fails to address what is necessary to possess the type of freedom which would allow man to define himself. If it can be established that this freedom and the ability to make choices is contingent upon something else, then freedom cannot be the starting point from which man defines himself....   [tags: god, human nature]

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Jean-Paul Sartre’s Play No Exit

- Jean-Paul Sartre’s Play “No Exit” Existentialism is a very confusing concept to understand. Existentialism is a school of thought, so to speak, where people believe that for every action there is a reaction. Moreover, most of the time, the reaction is a negative one. There is the basic understanding that humans have free will. They have the choice to do whatever they feel in life, which in turn makes life very stressful. Our choices obviously result in some other consequence, and as I said, the consequences, though we may not notice, are negative ones....   [tags: Existentialism Sartre No Exit Essays]

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Characters in Sartre's No Exit

- Characters in Sartre's No Exit     “No Exit,” by Jean-Paul Sartre, is a play that illustrates three people’s transitions from wanting to be alone in Hell to needing the omnipresent “other” constantly by their sides. As the story progresses, the characters’ identities become more and more permanent and unchangeable. Soon Inez, Garcin, and Estelle live in the hope that they will obtain the other’s acceptance. These three characters cannot accept their existentialist condition: they are alone in their emotions, thoughts and fears....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre No Exit Essays]

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The Body as Anstoss in Sartre's Account of Constitution

- The Body as Anstoss in Sartre's Account of Constitution ABSTRACT: Of all the German idealists, Jean-Paul Sartre refers the least to Fichte-so little in fact that there have been long-standing suspicions that he was not even familiar with Fichte's writings. It is perhaps ironic, then, that Fichte's writings are as helpful as they are for clarifying Sartre's views, especially his views on subjectivity and inter-subjectivity. Here I want to look closely at a key concept in Fichte's mature writings: the concept of the Anstoss, a concept which Dan Breazeale has called "Fichte's original insight." Fichte introduces the Anstoss, or "check," to explain why the I posits the world as it does....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre Philosophy Existentialism]

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Existentialism And Human Emotions By Jean Paul Sartre

- Another famous philosopher in support with my idea of the good life is Jean Paul Sartre, he spends the majority of his book, Existentialism and Human Emotions, expressing his disapproval of the generalization of humans. Each man or woman is their own person and contains the ability to choose his or her values. He believes the way of living is for each individual to choose, and that any person has the right to change their job, where they live or even their way of living. Sartre looks upon humans as intelligent beings, able to make rash choices and take responsible for their actions....   [tags: Human, Existentialism, Meaning of life]

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Jean-Paul Sartre’s Play, The Flies

- Jean-Paul Sartre’s play, The Flies is a tragedy in which Sartre melts philosophy, politics, and literature together. Sartre uses his literary talents and places countless themes and literary devices in The Flies in order to make statements about human beings as well as the political turmoil of 1946; freedom is a constant and obvious theme throughout the play, and Sartre even goes so far as to use inanimate objects, such as stones, to insert deeper meaning into the play. Sartre inserts bits of his life into the tragedy as well....   [tags: the flies]

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Jean Paul Sartre´s Existential Philosophy

- ... According to Sartre, individuals are free from the moment of their birth and they continue on throughout life to define their essence. The nature of an individual is what we have done in the past and what we do in the present moments, as such, our nature is never fully defined until we lose our ability to act in the moments that follow our death. After our ultimate end, we are defined by others as the accumulation and result of our deeds, successes, and our failures. Being precedes essence; we are created as individuals without the help of a higher being....   [tags: being, nothingness, death]

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Jean Paul Sartre and the Fundamental Project

- Jean Paul Sartre and the Fundamental Project In this paper I am addressing Jean Paul Sartre premise of the fundamental project. In my presentation I will first give a brief over view of Sartre's existentialism. Next Sartre's a notions of the spontaneous and reflective phases of consciousness will be my focus Upon discussing the reflective phase I will go into depth about the fundamental project, and why it is pursued, and I will give examples from No Exit. I will conclude by making a brief contrast and comparisson between Garcin, a character from No Exit, and myself....   [tags: Papers]

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Sartre 's View Of Consciousness

- Both of these existentialists differ also when it comes to their approach to living the authentic life. Sartre has a direct approach in which he asks the individual to acknowledge death as simply another stage of life, in which one should be responsible of his own choices and not think of life as seen by others. Heidegger in the other hand, seeks to contemplate death, even if it brings anxiety, thus having to transcend the facticity that may stop us from being authentic. In other words, Sartre sees humans as the creatures that define existence, while Heidegger sees humans as merely followers of the idea of being, “Man is not the lord of beings....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Martin Heidegger]

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Jean Paul Sartre on the Anti Semite

- Jean Paul Sartre on the Anti Semite Describe the anti-semitic person's attitude toward reason. How does his attitude toward reason reflect or reveal his general attitude toward life, the human condition and even himself. How does his attitude toward reason compare to the attitude of the rational man. Sartre explains that an Anti-Semite is "impenetrable", and it is actually something he strives to achieve. By gaining impenetrability, the Anti-Semite strengthens his beliefs because another person is not capable of reasoning with him....   [tags: Papers]

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Jean-Paul Sartre's No Exit and Existentialis

- No Exit and Existentialis Jean-Paul Sartre's portrayal of Hell in No Exit is fueled with dramatic irony, implemented in order to amuse the reader. Sartre's illustration of Hades is very psychological, and instead of Satan agonizing you, three roommates take to the task. They each in turn irritate and aggravate one another, thus making themselves hysterical, and thus producing dramatic irony. In addition to a door that will not open, and living in a windowless room, all three characters possess no eyelids, and thus are unable to sleep....   [tags: essays papers]

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Jean-Paul Sartre’s Philosophy: Radical Freedom and Responsibility

- “We are left alone, without excuse. This is what I mean when I say that man is condemned to be free” (Sartre 32). Radical freedom and responsibility is the central notion of Jean-Paul Sartre’s philosophy. However, Sartre himself raises objections about his philosophy, but he overcomes these obvious objections. In this paper I will argue that man creates their own essence through their choices and that our values and choices are important because they allow man to be free and create their own existence....   [tags: Philosophy ]

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Hsün Tzu and Jean-Paul Sartre Comparison of two Philosophers

- Fraud, murder, courage, and strong will are all words that can be linked to humanity. These words will often raise questions like, who did it, how they did it, or why. Can it be that the true answer to these questions lies in getting a better understanding of our human nature. Does man act according to his divine plan, or is he taught how to act. In analyzing the works of Hsün Tzu and Jean-Paul Sartre, I will determine which of these two philosophers offers the strongest foundation for living an ethical life in the modern era....   [tags: compare, contrast]

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Jean Paul Sartre's Existentialist Belief, We Are Completely Free

- ... I support Sartre’s position on that idea that humans are completely free. I believe that we are responsible for our human nature and purpose by the actions we choose to take. I agree with the idea that people are first born and then they choose their existence. Everyone has to be born, but once you are born I feel that you are free to become who you choose to be. There are always options and different paths to take in life; it is just a matter of what one is chosen by you to take. I don’t believe that there is a universal human nature that is shared by all humans in the universe....   [tags: philisophy, actions, agony]

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Jean-Paul Sartre: On the Other Side of Despair

- Jean-Paul Sartre: On the Other Side of Despair   In an age of modern pessimism and inauthentic, insignificant existence, Jean-Paul Sartre clearly stands out amongst the masses as a leading intellectual, a bastion of hope in the twentieth century. Confronting anguish and despair, absurdity and freedom, nihilism and transcendence, "Sartre totalized the twentieth century... in the sense that he was responsive with theories to each of the great events he lived through" as Arthur C. Danto commented (Marowski and Matuz 371)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Jean-Paul Sartre - Problems with the Notion of Bad Faith

- Jean-Paul Sartre - Problems with the Notion of Bad Faith In Being and Nothingness, Jean-Paul Sartre presents the notion of "bad faith." Sartre is a source of some controversy, when considering this concept the following questions arise. "Of what philosophical value is this notion. Why should I attend to what one commentator rightly labels Sartre's 'Teutonically metaphysical prose' (Stevenson, p. 253), in order to drag out some meaning from a work so obviously influenced by Heidegger....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Jean-Paul Sartre

- Jean-Paul Sartre Jean-Paul Sartre was an existentialist philosopher. The questions of his philosophy often come out in his readings. Existentialism questions why we exist. Existentialists deny the existence of God. Existentialist writers such as Kafka and Sartre often use prisons and solitary confinement to tell their stories. Often, neither the reader nor the protagonist is aware of what crime has been committed. Jean-Paul Sartre’s “The Wall” reflects his philosophy and personal experiences. He worked for the French resistance and was imprisoned by the Germans during WWII....   [tags: Biography Biographies Philosophers Essays]

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The Existential Position Toward Susan Orlean 's ' Sunday Night '

- +The existential position toward Susan Orlean’s essay “Saturday Night” is one that rejects the dehumanizing state of “Saturdayness” and man being defined solely as the hedonistic Being-for-St. Elsewhere (Man as Future-State Man). Her guidelines for Saturday night directly contrast the existentialist ideals of freedom, the individual, and living in the present, and the philosopher Jean-Paul Satre surely would agree. *Even Orlean herself admits “chronological time is a sort of an anachronism these days”: the “Fun Imperative” has been replaced by the “Fear Imperative” (AIDS); and the living-for-the-future syndrome is a Satrian act of “bad faith” and must be acknowledged as such....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism]

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Simone De Beauvoir 's All Men Are Mortal

- Martha Nussbaum makes an important point when she suggests that literature is useful when it comes to understanding philosophy and philosophical concepts. In particular, Simone de Beauvoir’s All Men Are Mortal is useful in the way that Nussbaum describes because the treatment of existential concepts in the book allow the reader to gain insight into the life of a committed existentialist and into the desirability of this type of life. The book does so by being more accessible to readers and reaches a wider audience since it is not written using jargon like many dense philosophic writings....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Existentialism and Its Role today

- The Good Life is an expression representing how one would like to live out their life. In other words, how that person achieves happiness. There are three theories that correlate to the Good Life: daoism, stoicism, and existentialism. Since each person defines their happiness differently, each person has their own opinion as to whether or not what is read to be correct or not. The goal is to at least shine a light onto what everyone seems drawn towards. Existentialism is an important theory to consider in order to achieve the Good Life....   [tags: Jean Paul Sartre, Kierkegarrd]

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Jean Paul Marat: Target and Martyr of Liberty

- Jean Paul Marat: Target and Martyr of Liberty The French Revolution produced countless influential politicians throughout its tumultuous course. As a political figure in the French Revolution, Jean Paul Marat began as a nonentity and became a martyr to the revolutionary patriots of France. His influence is often misconstrued, and sometimes overlooked. Although he was not a political leader like Robespierre, his influence was substantial in that he motivated many people through his writings and powerful personality....   [tags: Jean Paul Marat Politics Essays]

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Existentialism And Its Impact On Society

- As one bends down to retrieve a copper coin on the street with rusted eyes staring back at him, he also sees his future. At least today’s society generates this idea when people see Abraham Lincoln gazing at them from the front of a penny on the sidewalk. Many use objects like this as symbols of significance that they can latch onto, as they gallop through life with the hand of an inherent whip striking at their rumps. These human animals whinny, neigh, and keep muzzled as deemed appropriate by the significance they continuously chase....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Existentialism And Its Impact On Society

- The universe we inhabit is by all accounts an atypical one; a few people manage its foolishness by encompassing themselves with faith, while others disregard all its significance. Existentialism, nonetheless, ushers us down a remarkable course that darkens these perspectives toward one of a kind belief structure. Despite the fact that we can experience circumstances that are out of our control, we do have the ability to control how we manage said circumstances and regardless of whether we decide to create significance from them....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Existentialism : A Philosophical Idea

- ... There it is elaborated on the importance of others in defining oneself. Other people are required to acknowledge the essence created by the decisions made. People are interested in what others think of them, and use it to define themselves. This is the context to the essence, the actions taken place within society are not fixed, rather change with the situation. To establish the self other’s play a role by mediating the opposition for example. The situation is critical because the things that happen around us are never crystal clear and so we rely on others to tell us who we are in the situation, what our essence is....   [tags: Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism]

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Existentialism : I Heart Huckabees

- ... In our individual practices, every individual plans to be the best that we are fit for being. Despite the fact that the thought of existentialism is convoluted, sure subjects are normal amongst rationalists, for example, moral independence, opportunity of decision, obligation, and distance. The key to comprehending existentialism is the comprehension of good independence. Existentialism rejects customary moral endeavors. Philosophers since the season of Aristotle contended for the presence of an immaculate being, which is responsible for the wholeness and intentionality of nature as higher being....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Jean-Paul Sartre and Louis Althusser as Responses to Vichy France

- Jean-Paul Sartre and Louis Althusser as Responses to Vichy France The Second World War seems to have had an enormous impact on theorists writing on literary theory. While their arguments are usually confined to a structure that at first blush seems to only apply to theory, a closer examination finds that they contain an inherently political aspect. Driven by the psychological trauma of the war, theorists, particularly French theorists, find themselves questioning the structures that led to the particular events and situations of the war....   [tags: Literary Theory]

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A Comparison Between William James' and Jean Paul Sartre's Points of View on Emotions

- A Comparison Between William James' and Jean Paul Sartre's Points of View on Emotions What is an emotion. William James and Jean-Paul Sartre present two different arguments regarding what constitutes an emotion. This paper will explore William James' analysis of emotion as set out in his 1884 essay . It will attempt to discover the main points of his view, and then present Sartre's rebuttal of this view taken from his essay on emotions . Concluding with an explanation regarding why Sartre's account is flawed and James's argument is the stronger of the two, it will use outside examples to demonstrate the various weaknesses and strengths within the two perspectives....   [tags: Papers]

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Garcin and Hamlet

- Jean-Paul Sartre and William Shakespeare, while centuries and mindsets apart, both examined through drama the meaning of existence and the weight that man’s actions bear on his soul. In Sartre’s No Exit and Shakespeare’s Hamlet, their characters struggle with the mere concept of death and the mysteries that accompany it as they also struggle to accept choices and decisions made during life. Spirituality and the quest for life’s meaning conflict the protagonists of both works. Sartre and Shakespeare chose symbolic representation of spiritual ideals through props, specifically the bronze ornament resting on the mantelpiece of No Exit’s Hell, and the skull of Yorick, Prince Hamlet’s form...   [tags: jean-paul sartre, shakespeare]

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Human Freedom : A Complex Idea That Integrates Personal Liberty

- ... Therefore, freedom can never be achieved when people have a various views on freedom and what it means to them. Existentialism. A word most people would not even know but is practised profusely in many people’s lives. It is a philosophy that emphasizes individual existence, freedom and choice. It is when humans define their own meaning in life and try to make wise decisions despite existing in an irrational universe. Jean-Paul Sartre stated that human freedom is the freedom to make oneself; to choose what type of character you will have, what you believe in, your values, attitudes and morals....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Human]

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Jean Paul Sartres Writing - No Exit

- Jean Paul Sartre’s Philosophical Writing Jean Paul Sartre personally believed in the philosophical idea of existentialism, which is demonstrated in his play No Exit. His ideas of existentialism were profoundly outlined in the play. Based on the idea that mental torture is more agonizing than physical, No Exit leaves the reader with mixed emotions towards the importance of consequences for one’s acts. Set in Hell, the vision of the underworld is nothing the characters imagined as they are escorted to a Second Empire styled hotel....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Existentialism, By Jean Paul

- ... It is essentially seeing oneself as an ambiguous reversionary reality with nothing to stand on. Sartre firmly had faith in the essential freedom of individuals, and he also believed that as free beings, people are responsible for every aspect of themselves, their consciousness, and their behavior. Ultimately, with complete freedom comes complete responsibility. He believed that even the individuals who wish not to be responsible, who advocate themselves not responsible for themselves or their actions, are still able to make a conscious choice and are thereby responsible for anything that happens as a consequence of their inactivity....   [tags: Human, Meaning of life, Philosophy of life]

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Summary Of Cordwainer Smith 's Story ' Alpha Ralpha Boulevard '

- ... One exists freely, in the moment, for a lack of a more elegant term. The “self” is being constantly renewed, in opposition of the fixed reality of things. There isn’t a predetermined self that one becomes over time, as a result of a series of choices. Instead, “I throw myself without help and without guidance into a world where I am not installed ahead of time waiting for myself. I am free, and my projects are not defined by preexisting interests; they posit their own ends.” Synthesizing both of these views, we come to the conclusion that existentialism is an atheistic, subjective view on life, in which existence precedes essence....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Perspectives on Hell in Jean Sartre's No Exit

- Do you have an identity without this society. Hell is not about suffering or punishment. Hell is the society that we live in. People who surround us make our life in hell or heaven for us. People around us make our life miserable by judging our actions. The society that we live in like to judge our acts and bring it to different level where we lost our self-identity and live with the misunderstanding of what people says about us. In No Exit, from Paul Jean carries the bigger idea of hell being other people....   [tags: Social Issues, Plot Summary]

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Existentialism : The Common Man 's Meaning

- The Common Man’s Meaning Existentialism is a term that was coined specifically by Jean-Paul Sartre in regards to his own life. Sartre had adopted the Atheistic approach to life and its meaning, and while he was not the first or only one to do so, was the first and only one to come up with a way to describe it. Under Existentialism, man lives without higher power or guidance and must rely solely on himself and what he is aiming to do in order to lead a fulfilling life. This can be anything. Critics of Sartre propose that, because such a vast array of options exists within the meaningfulness of life, this philosophy is obsolete and trivial in nature....   [tags: Meaning of life, Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Existentialism Is A Defining Point Of Existentialism

- ... In the existentialist outlook, anxiety makes one realize the senselessness of the world. With this collapse of one’s preoccupation with meaningless characteristics such as race, age, and job, one loses “the basic sense of who [one is] that is provided by these roles” (Crowell). In the same way that someone might repeat a word until it loses its meaning “anxiety undermines the taken-for-granted sense of things” (Crowell). Thus, one who grasps these ideas is brought face to face with their own death: the fact that they are not anything (known as “nothingness”)....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus]

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Feminism And The Second Sex

- ... Beauvoir notes that the differences between men and women are right in front of you and are hard to be ignored. She said that “perhaps these differences are superficial, perhaps they are destined to disappear. What is certain is that they do most obviously exist” (14). Beauvoir believed that women were viewed as weaker or lesser to men only because they had been historically disadvantaged. Because women have been put in situations where have been thought to be inferior to men, they are considered to be “the Other” while men are subjects. Being a woman “is defined and differentiated with reference to man and not he with reference to her; she is the incidental, the inessential as opposed...   [tags: Feminism, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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The Malicious Jean Paul Marat

- On July 13, 1793, Jean Paul Marat, an important leader during the French revolution, was assassinated in his bathing-tub. Marat began as a writer on politics and grew to be a violent radical leader. A young woman, Charlotte Corday, assassinated Marat for all the death and destruction he had caused. Marat was honorably laid to rest, and the political parties of the revolution began to fall. Corday murdered Marat in good intentions and her courageous act saved hundreds of people. Marat, a determined radical leader persecuted those who believed differently from him and because of his words and actions, he was assassinated....   [tags: French Revolution, France]

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Jean Theories Of Jean Of The World

- Jean William Fritz Piaget was born on August 9, 1896 in Neuchâtel, in the Fracophone region of Switzerland. He was the oldest son of father Arthur Piaget, a professor of medieval literature at the University of Neuchatel, and mother Rebecca Jackson (piaget.org). Jean Piaget was a very bright and advanced young child who showed an intense interest in small animals and a vast knowledge in the fields of Biology and Taxonomy. When Piaget was simply ten years old, he began volunteering at the Neuchatel Museum of Natural History under the watchful eye of the seventy year-old museum director, naturalist Paul Godet....   [tags: Jean Piaget, Theory of cognitive development]

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I Heart Huckabees : Existential And Philosophical Themes

- ... By the end of the film, Albert realizes that the path to authenticity involves a combination of the existential detectives’ beliefs and Caterine’s nihilistic beliefs. Albert tells Caterine and the detectives that “You’re too dark, and you’re not dark enough” (I Heart Huckabees). He becomes aware that everything being interconnected is true but it derives from human suffering. In the very first scene, Albert is reading a poem about a rock that his environmental organization was able to save....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Existentialism And Its Impact On Popular Music

- Existentialism is a difficult philosophy to define as many philosophers have rejected the term being applied to themselves. The main idea of existentialism, “existence precedes essence” (Sartre), is one of the accepted definitions for existentialism. Some of the other themes associated with existentialism are, “Dread, boredom, alienation, the absurd, freedom, commitment, nothingness, and so on” (Stanford). Existentialist themes are prevalent throughout film and literature, but the philosophy is not as common in popular music....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Eleanor Rigby]

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History of the History of Jean Paul Marat

- As an English speaking college student with only a basic, conversational understanding of French, finding historical information specifically on Jean-Paul Marat has been rather difficult. Nearly every work printed in English that could be located on this intriguing man is printed in a collection of short biographies about famous figures of the French Revolution and so, naturally focuses primarily on his part in the Revolution and less on himself specifically, with what books there are about him alone being written by the same two scholars: Louis R Gottschalk, Ph.D....   [tags: history of France, French Revolution]

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Sartre's Theories and Sylvia Plath's Poem Lady Lazarus

- Sartre's Theories and Sylvia Plath's Poem Lady Lazarus After reading Sartre's Essays in Existentialism, I evaluated Sylvia Plath's poem "Lady Lazarus" according to my interpretation of Sartre's philosophy, then used this aesthetic impression to evaluate the efficacy of Sartre's theories as they apply toward evaluating and understanding art. If you have not read the poem in question, I suggest you go here to check it out before reading this essay. "We write our own destiny -- we become what we do." -- Madame Chiang Kai-Shek When a reader experiences Sylvia Plath, immediately he is aware that he has never read anything like it....   [tags: Sartre Sylvia Plath Lazarus Philosophy Essays]

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John Paul Sartre

- John Paul Sartre John Paul Sartre is known as one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. He wrote many philosophical works novels and plays. Much of his work is tied into politics. The essay Existentialism is a Humanism is just one of his many works. Existentialism is a Humanism is a political essay that was written in 1945. Its purpose was to address a small public during World War II in Nazi occupied France. This essay stressed the public not to conform. Sartre introduced a great number of philosophical concepts in Existentialism....   [tags: Papers]

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Existentialism As The Bridge Of Modernism And Post Modernism

- ... Furthermore, the existentialists deem that although there are not any other external existences in the world except for human, human should exercise its irrational instinct to create values, which is because people’s rational thinking is relied on external existence (Mart, 2012, 52). Then, external existence is nothingness and it is human’s irrational instinct that can assist human to exert its original value of “being” substantially. While focusing on the values of human’s original being and its irrational consciousness, most existentialists, such as Camus, Hediger, Sartre, and Neitiche, worry that since human is the only being in the universe, it is doomed to lonely, independent, and h...   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Ontology]

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The Radical Journalist And Jacobin Jean Paul Marat

- One of the most important factors of the political clubs is the way in which they deceived the common people to support them. After Louis XVI was executed the Republicans demonstrated that they were not all about freedom after all. The Radical journalist and Jacobin Jean-Paul Marat did a tremendous job at striking fear into the Girondins and completely defeating the point of a Republic. Marat wrote vicious stories that ironically called for the suppression of freedom of press for the opponents to the government....   [tags: French Revolution, Reign of Terror, Georges Danton]

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Life According to Sartre

- “The Room” by Jean-Paul Sartre takes us on a journey through the conflict of man with the world. Eve makes the choice to sacrifice self identity to care for her mentally ill husband Pierre. In the beginning of the book “The Wall and Other Stories” Sartre invites us to interpret the text from an existentialist point of view. So we must understand Sartre philosophical meaning of life. “What is the meaning of life?” Jean-Paul Sartre defines life as first accepting our own faults and strengths, to then understand that the world exists regardless of our actions, and it is only when we actively participate and take responsibility for our place in the world do we honestly experience life....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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Existentialism

- In his 1946 essay Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre undertakes the task of defending existentialism against what he defines as “charges” (341) brought against it. Sartre begins to outline the “charges” brought against existentialism and further, existentialists. Following the medieval quaestio-form, Sartre begins with the statement of the objection, a short discussion, and then his reply to each. The first of the charges is that of quietism. “First, it has been charged with inviting people to remain in a kind of desperate quietism because, since no solutions are possible, we should have to consider action in this world as quite impossible” (341)....   [tags: Analysis, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Paul's Character in Paul's Case

- Paul's Character in Paul's Case Pauls's Case is the story of a young man who struggles with his identity. Paul feels that he knows where he belongs, but his family and teachers refuse to support his choices. In the middle of Paul's Case, there is a switch in narration. At this point, the reader can associate with Paul and his problems. Paul struggles with both internal and external conflicts, causing him to be quite a puzzling character. From tha perspective of his family and teachers, Paul seems abnormal....   [tags: Paul]

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Analysis Of ' No Exit '

- “This bronze. Yes, now’s the moment; I’m looking at this thing on the mantelpiece, and I understand that I’m in hell. I tell you, everything’s been thought out beforehand. They knew I’d stand at the fireplace stroking this thing of bronze, with all those eyes intent on me. Devouring me. What. Only two of you. I thought there were more; many more. So this is hell. I’d never have believed it. You remember all we were told about the torture-chambers, the fire and brimstone, the “burning marl.” Old wives’ tales....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, Mind, Thought]

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The Concept of 'Bad Faith' in the Philosophy of Sartre

- The Concept of ‘Bad Faith’ in the Philosophy of Sartre Jean-Paul Sartre was the French philosopher and a versatile thinker and writer. He is today known for two systematic and extraordinary works in the field of philosophy. Besides these two phenomenal works- ‘Being and Nothingness’ and ‘Critique of Dialectical Reason’- Sartre developed some shorter philosophical versions including; several screenplays, plays, and novels; essays on art and literary criticism; short stories; an autobiography; scores of journalistic and political writing; and original and distinctive biographies of different writers....   [tags: French philosophers, existetialism]

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Philosophical Insight On My Life Philosophy

- ... In a world of idols, high expectations, and expected flawlessness, it is easy to lose sight of the fact that be by nature are flawed, and by definition, can never achieve true perfection. Accepting that we can never be perfect is a necessary realization. Even more prudent however, is continuing to live a meaningful life despite our inevitable fault. One cannot be bogged down by the weight of imperfection, but must possess the drive and wonder in life to still try to grow anyways. It is important to recognize that there is still value in flaw....   [tags: Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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The Man Vs. Self

- ... One is that since each character needs one another,it would be MAN vs. MAN, but in reality a person does not need one other person making it all in their heads giving the reader the MAN vs SELF. In the play, Inez realizes what is happening when she says “Ah, that’s the way it works, is it. Torture by separation” (Sartre 8). Inez in that quote is realizing that she is not in literal hell but she is in a variation of hell and the “torturing” that happens from the “devil”. When someone thinks in their head that they need another person that can put them in hell, as stated here by Méra, “Which means that if my relations are bad, I am situating myself in a total dependence on someone else....   [tags: Meaning of life, Life, Jean-Paul Sartre]

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Sartre and the Meaning of Human Existence

- Where the Meaning of Human Existence is Located According to Sartre The word philosophy comes from Greek and literally means "love of wisdom." The Merriam-Webster online dictionary defines philosophy as "a critical study of fundamental beliefs and the grounds for them." Both explanations of philosophy are correct and concrete. The meaning of human existence has no such concrete answer, but in this paper we will examine where Sartre believes it to be. Sartre's existentialism is a philosophy, which deals with man....   [tags: Sartre's Existentialism, Philosophy]

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Jean Jacques Rousseau : A Brief Summary

- Rousseau: A Brief Summary Jean-Jacques Rousseau has been referred to as the father of the romanticism movement due to his philosophical writings challenging the status quo at the time. To help set the cultural scene surrounding him, he lived in Paris just prior to the French Revolution where turmoil was in the atmosphere. During this time in France’s history monarchs reigned, the Catholic Church was the leading religion, and those who were considered commoners were viewed as less than human. I believe Rousseau’s environment led him to ponder and write about assumptions regarding human nature, the government’s role in relation to humans, types of will people have, and educational methods....   [tags: Political philosophy, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Human]

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Paul Pontieri 's Mayor Was Concern About Jean Kaledas Call

- Paul Pontieri, Patchogue 's mayor was concern about Jean Kaledas call. Paul Pontieri was informed about the violence against latinos in patchongue where he was raised and born. Patchogue was a town where was well known as a immigrant town, and Paul Pontieri refuse to believe that anti-immigrant hatred was happening in Patchogue. During his childhood Patchogue was was a great place for a kid where they could ride their bikes anywhere, and their parents did not have to make play dates. Pontieri was concern about immigrant hatred in patchongue, and he believed that no one should be afraid of walking the streets at night because of hatred against skin color or accent....   [tags: Immigration to the United States, United States]

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Use of Symbols in Paul's Case

- Symbols are one of those most important things to a story. They share the meaning of themselves, as well as the meaning for something else. Symbols usually make the important ideas stick out as well as make the reader have different ideas of what is actually being said. One of the many symbols in “Paul’s Case” is flower’s. From violets to carnations, the flowers Paul talks about are ones of many meanings. The flowers represent a continual motif, expressing Paul’s character. The narrator expresses the teacher’s views towards Paul’s flowers, “…his whole attitude was symbolized by his shrug and his flippantly red carnation…” (Cather)....   [tags: Paul's Case]

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