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James Madison And The Federalist Papers

- James Madison and the Federalist Papers In the late 1700s, it was apparent that the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation did not establish the type of government needed to keep the nation together as a nation-state. The American people needed to find a more effective way to govern themselves and this was no easy feat. Most Americans had varying political thoughts in the 18th century. The challenge because how to best take care of the masses in a fair and equitable way....   [tags: United States Constitution, James Madison]

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Analysis Of The Exchange Between Thomas Jefferson And James Madison

- After reading the exchange between Thomas Jefferson and James Madison on the question of central importance to American constitutionalism—whether any Constitution, including the United States Constitution, needs to be positively reauthorized or not by every succeeding generation for it to remain legitimate, I believe that what Jefferson demands in his letter as in all too much else, is ignorance, even rage against the past. His principle on expiring the constitution and laws every 19 years would only result in weak government that offers no social continuity and stability....   [tags: United States Constitution, James Madison]

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Analysis Of The Book ' Dolley Madison '

- Dolley Madison was known as the wife of the United States President James Madison from 1809-1817. Dolly Payne was born in the Quaker community of North Carolina, on May 20, 1768. She marries James Madison after her husband John Todd and son William died the same day of yellow fever. The representation of the video of Dolley’ life was up to my expectation they included the voice the dressing and the housing. Just the way I imagined their lifestyle on the 1700, the main characters of the story looking so much like her including her facial expressions as they were describing her....   [tags: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison]

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Marbury V. Madison ( 1803 )

- Marbury v. Madison (1803) is one of the most important cases in the history of the Supreme Court. It began in 1800, with the beginning of the Democratic-Republican party of Thomas Jefferson (McBride). John Adams of the Federalist Party had just been defeated and creating political alarm for the group (McBride). John Adams in his final days of presidency decided to appoint a great number of justices of the peace (McBride). The new President Jefferson and his Republicans were infuriated with Adams act before he left office....   [tags: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison]

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James Madison: The Father of The Constitution

- James Madison was born in 1751; he was the oldest of 12 children. He was from a wealthy Virginian family. James was a small child and was not healthy or rambunctious; he spent a lot of time reading. He was married later in life to Dolley Payne Todd and had no children. Madison attended the College of New Jersey which later took the name of Princeton University; he took a liking to history and politics, that opened bigger doors for the soon to be president of the United States. In 1776, the Declaration of Independence was ratified; while a member of the Virginia State Legislature, Madison helped create the Virginia State Constitution....   [tags: american history, articles of confederations]

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The Political Career of James Madison

- James Madison was a very important and famous political leader in the early 1800’s. Although, he may not be as well known as George Washington or Benjamin Franklin, his impact on shaping the U.S. was very significant. Throughout his life, James Madison was always involved in politics within the U.S. After leaving his position as a colonel for the Virginia militia, he was recognized for his writing ability, which became the foundation for shaping his political career (Fritz 21). James Madison was a founding father of the U.S., a father of the Constitution and the fourth President to take office....   [tags: treaty of ghent, constitution, virginia militia]

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The Constitution Of 1787 By James Madison

- The Tenth Amendment was added to the Constitution of 1787 by James Madison due to the problem with its predecessor, the Articles of Confederation. In Article 2 in the Articles of Confederation it states, “Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every Power, Jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled.” With states having too much sovereignty this caused an issue. Madison was a Federalist and believed that the federal government should have some control over states, therefore, he proposed the 10th Amendment....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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James Madison and the Federalist Papers

- On September 17, 1787, the Philadelphia Convention sent their new constitution to the states for ratification. The Federalists highly approved of the Constitution because it allowed for a more central and powerful government that was previously undermined under the Articles of Confederation. The Anti-Federalists, however, didn’t want a powerful central government, but, instead, powerful state governments; in response to the Constitution, many Anti-Federalists began writing essays and creating pamphlets as a means of arguing against it....   [tags: Federalist Papers]

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The War Of 1812 By James Madison

- The War of 1812 In June of 1812 James Madison, proposed that congress should declare war with the largest navel powers in the world, Great Britain. This declaration was the result of several years of poor relations between the two nations. Madison presented a list of grievances against Great Britain and brought it before congress, after weeks of debates they voted for war on June 18th, 1812. The issues of British impressment of American sailors, the failure to respect the United States neutrality in their war with France, and the arming of Native Americans who attacked American colonists were the key deciding factors....   [tags: War of 1812, United States]

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The Bill Of Rights By James Madison

- When the Bill of Rights was written by James Madison in 1791, the First Adamant says that one’s freedom of speech or expression of personal beliefs will not be restrained (Bill of Rights Institute). Two centuries later, U.S. society has changed so much from the early days of America, it is hard to determine if someone’s freedom of speech is still protected under the First Adamant. Court cases and State government policies have brought this issue up when it comes to the education of children in America....   [tags: Supreme Court of the United States]

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The Federalist Paper By James Madison

- James Madison wrote the federalist papers to explain the federal system should of government to the the american people. The federalist papers also introduced the idea of factions in a republican government. James Madison describes a faction as a small, organized group that forms within a larger group which is often present in politics. Republican governments are prone to factions. In order for a republican government to be successful it is important to protect against factions. Madison believed there are two ways to protect against factions;to get rid of them or control them....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The Second Amendment By James Madison

- The second amendment, originally proposed by James Madison as part of the Bill of Rights, was ratified on December 15, 1791 and clearly states, “A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” Many people who are ignorant about the true meaning of the second amendment will tell you that it is all about hunting. Though I can tell you after taking many government and US history classes that the meaning of the second amendment means far more than the right to hunt....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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Factionalism According To James Madison

- The writers of “The Federalist Papers,” Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, strongly opposed the oftentimes negative effects of factionalism on government efficiency. Within “The Federalist Paper No. 10,” Madison explains factionalism, what causes it, its effect on American society and how to limit the damage cause by opposing factions. The nation’s original constitution was being re-evaluated by the various delegates present during the Constitutional Convention of 1787. The Articles of Confederation, as the preliminary constitution was christened, had been the bylaws of the United States for six years....   [tags: Causes, Effects, Cures]

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Alexander Hamilton And James Madison

- Alexander Hamilton and James Madison had faith in the ethics of the people to establish a republican government. Alexander Hamilton and James Madison did have faith in the ethics of the people to establish a republican government, for they could see that the old Federalist Government was no longer working for the people. The people had out-grown the Federalist government, and needed to become a Union. Alexander Hamilton asked the people to come join him in making a new Union. By uniting the thirteen colonies, the colonists could have more of a say in their government, and become united as a country....   [tags: United States, Democracy]

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Analysis Of The Book ' Dolley Madison '

- Dolley Madison is a very popular name in world history mainly because of her being our country’s fourth president. She is also known for her ability’s to host parties and gathering at the White House, with her riveting personality and her charismatic in her character traits and her way of living life. She didn’t entertain people like most of her time did with loads of alcohol and drinking, but with nice, clean, wholesome fun. She is one of the most unsung heroes of The War of 1812. As the British were marching on Washington, Dolley was protecting it like it was her own....   [tags: James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Dolley Madison]

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Analysis Of The Book ' Dolley Madison '

- Dolley Madison is a very profound name in world history, mainly because of her being our country’s fourth president. She is also known for her ability’s to host parties and gathering at the White House, with her riveting personality and her charismatic in her character traits and her way of living life. She didn’t entertain people like most of her time did with loads of alcohol and drinking, but with nice, clean, wholesome fun. She is one of the most unsung heroes of The War of 1812. As the British was trudging on Washington, Dolley was protecting it like it was her own....   [tags: James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Dolley Madison]

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Biography of James Madison: The Father of the Constitution

- ... John's Episcopal Church in the duration of his presidency. In 1784, he battled Patrick Henry because he was trying to tax the citizen to support the Christian religion. Madison was dedicated to separating Church and state and he selected some documents that supports Virginia’s devotion to religious freedom. During this time, he had become acquaintances with Thomas Jefferson. Two years later, he was appointed to the Virginia Council of State. This only further secured the bond between Madison and Jefferson,who was the governor of Virginia at the time during the war....   [tags: wealth, society, president]

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James Madison on the Constitution and the Bill of Rights

- ... Madison saw this as a way to counteract factions by not getting rid of them, but instead having factions cancel each other out by majority vote. This is due to the fact that if you have a lot of factions that have different on a given topic then no matter how big or small the faction is each will get equal representation and in theory the majority vote would show what the nation as a whole wants not just what one large overruling faction wants. Madison knew that a republic would not be full proof though....   [tags: power and oppression, government]

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Federalist No. 10 and No. 51 by James Madison

- Federalist No. 10 and No. 51 were a series of essays written by James Madison, arguing for the ratification of the U.S Constitution. Before the ratification, the Articles of Confederation only bounded the thirteen colonies, uniting them as military alliance rather than a cohesive government. The central government lacked authority; the national government could not collect taxes or force states to comply with their laws. The lack of a strong central government made it difficult for states to operate effectively as one single nation....   [tags: thoughts of the 4th US president]

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Federalist Paper No. 51, by James Madison

- “In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself,” are words written by James Madison in The Federalist Papers No. 51. The Federalist Paper No. 51 is one of several documents that compose the Federalist Papers, a series of essays written by James Madison, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton promoting the ratification of the Constitution....   [tags: Checks and Balances]

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Federalist Paper 10, by James Madison

- The theories presented in Federalist Paper #10 by James Madison directly apply to many of the world’s utmost dilemmas. Madison’s first theory states that Factions can be very detrimental to the common, good. Madison’s second theory explains that a strong, large republic is the best form of government. Federalist Paper #10 is one essay in a series of papers written mostly by James Madison, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton, fighting for the ratification of the United States Constitution. In Federalist Paper #10 James Madison addresses the issue of “how to guard against factions.” The definition of a faction is “a group of citizens, with interest’s contrary to the rights of others or the inter...   [tags: Theories Modern Influence]

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James Madison 's The Federalist Papers

- She not only broke down each Crime in full detail and pin point actions to each one, but also cited water from credible source from great people such of the like James Madison who wrote the Federalist papers; and the South Carolina Reification Convention; and Justle Joseph Story who served as justice under Madison who is beg known for explaining the for states power under the committuution. She quoted James Madison to emphasize under point was making by sagity “a President is impeachable if he attempts to subvert the Constitution”....   [tags: United States]

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Journey Through History By James Madison

- Journey through History When I was around the age of 8 or 9, I read lots of books and realized it was so easy to be an author of a book. At that point of my life, I was convinced that I was going to be an author when I grow up. Throughout my life in elementary and middle school, I was given simple writing assignments that didn’t take much thought or research, making me feel as if the writing was effortless. I realized that when I entered high school, I would be writing papers that consisted of 5 to 6 pages long or longer and this would be challenging for me because of my weakness in writing....   [tags: Writing, High school, Essay]

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The Creation of the American Republicn - James Madison

- The Creation of the American Republicn - James Madison James Madison prided himself on his knowledge from books and theories. Madison was born into a class of Virginia planters. His father was the wealthiest landowner in Virginia and it was known that Madison would lead a financially secure life. This factor helped him in his pursuit of education. He gained opportunities to go to elite schools because of his status. Madison was ambitious and he graduated from the College of New Jersey a year early....   [tags: James Madisom Biography US History]

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The Father of the Constitution

- James Madison most notorious for his title of father of the Constitution was born on March 16, 1751 on a small plantation in Virginia. In his early life James Madison was very sickly suffered from psychosomatic, or stress-induced, seizures that accompanied the treat of Indians attack during the French and Indian War. This all changed James Madison Sr. acquired a good amount of money by marrying the daughter of a rich tobacco merchant Nelly Conway. They moved into the large plantation Montpelier, with seven younger siblings he was very studious and hardworking earning him the chance to study Princeton which was then called The College of New Jersey....   [tags: James Madison]

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James Madison and the Slavery Issue

- James Madison and the Slavery Issue The Revolutionary period of the United States was a time filled with much turmoil and confusion as to how this newly found nation, should be modeled. Many delicate issues were discussed and planned out to get the best outcome for all concerned. One of these issues that cast an ominous shadow over the new republic was the slavery issue. Some of the most prominent figures at the head of this nation wanted to bring about an end to it but continuously failed due to the inconvenience of finding a workable plan....   [tags: Papers]

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The Dangers of Factions Explained in James Madison's The Federalist No. 10

- ... Madison believes that factions are inherent to human nature, making it unavoidable that people are living under a state of liberty. Madison argues that "the most common and durable source of factions has been the various and unequal distribution of property" (Madison). I think what Madison is trying to state is that as long as people have different talents, economic statuses, and amounts of property, people will always continue to associate with others who have similar qualities as them. The difference between those who have and those who do not has always existed throughout human history, thus making it one of the most unavoidable causes of factions....   [tags: republic, tyranny, governement]

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James Madison's View of Factionalism

- Partisanship is a natural phenomenon for Human beings; we seek out, long for, and align ourselves with others who share our views. Through these people, we polish our ideas and gain courage from the knowledge that we are not alone in our viewpoint. Factions give breadth, depth, and volume to our individual voice. James Madison, the author of the Federalist #10 underlined the causes of factions, the dangers factions can pose, and solutions to the problem. . Factions can be present in many different settings in society....   [tags: Political Science]

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James Madison And Thomas Jefferson

- Through the Presidencies of both Jefferson and Madison, the nation had drastic changes. Each of the Presidents showed their views of being loose constructionists of the Constitution by their actions in office. These Presidents helped further the Republican ideas, like a small central government and the support of the lower class farmers. The powers of the Federalist Party slowly diminished as the Republican Party became the overwhelming majority. Thomas Jefferson made his inaugural address on March 4, 1801....   [tags: American History]

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An Analysis Of James Madison Writes 's Federalist No

- James Madison writes in Federalist No. 51, “[i]n framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself.” He goes on to explain his concept of “compound republic” in which two distinct governments (national and state) are further subdivided into separate departments. In each of the two distinct governments, the legislative, executive and judicial branches (departments) work like a scale to balance each other and prevent one from gaining too much power or influence....   [tags: Democracy, Government, Federalist Papers]

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Analysis Of James Madison 's ' Federalist 10 '

- In Federalist 10, James Madison is discussing the issue of factions in the US government. At first, Madison defines to us that factions are groups of people who share the same economic and political opinions. He believes that America is in turmoil from the effects of factions, but at the same time he believes that factions are inevitable as long as man have different opinions. Madison mentions that factions are constantly at war with each other, and normally are not looking out for the greater good of the people....   [tags: President of the United States, Elections]

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James Madison 's Federalist # 10 A Faction

- According to James Madison’s Federalist #10 a faction was a group of citizens, either large or small, who came together and act on common grounds for the rights of other people and/or their community. He believed that we as citizens naturally broke up into factions because of differences in opinion especially political ideology. Also Madison expressed that the distribution and collection of riches and property is so unequal that it causes the development of common faction. Although stating that factions are more of an inevitably harmful thing he does believe that they still are a way for the people to express their viewpoint to their government....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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James madison and Slavery

- James madison and slavery Slavery was a problem that faced all Americans in the years prior to the American Civil War. Many Americans wanted to bring about an end to it but were unable to come up with a workable plan. One person to try and find an answer to the problem was himself a slave owner; he was James Madison. The institution of slavery deeply concerned James Madison, even at the start of his political career. During his career, Madison held many important political offices; he used these offices to try to bring to an end this "evil" in his society....   [tags: Slavery Essays]

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Presidency of James Madison

- The presidency of James Madison was one which many people have disagreeing points of view on. Some historians think he was not one of our greater presidents because he let the United States fall into the conflict known as the war of 1812. Other historians think that Madison's presidency was a good one because he led America out of the war of 1812 and united the country. The presidency of James Madison while not being one of the greatest of all the presidents was still above average as a president because of Madison's administrative skills, international relations, and crisis leadership....   [tags: American History]

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James Madison

- The Founding Brother: James Madison The American Revolution emerge, and new ideas and changes were made from the Founding Brothers. The Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation...were all made and edit from the Founding Brothers. One of the Founding Brothers, did not experience the American revolution. James Madison, a federalist who was a republican-democratic had many goals he wanted to achieved. He looked back and was able to see what aspects of were done wrong and try to renew them for the future of the United States....   [tags: Biography]

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James Madison

- James Madison He was a small man at 5 feet 4 inches tall, less than 100 pounds with penetrating eyes, a charming smile, and parchment skin. "James Madison Jr. born into a large Episcopalian family on March 16,1751 in Port Conway, Virginia, made a large political impact on the United States of America" (The Federalist 1). "He was frequently referred to as the father of the Constitution, for he made many provisions to it's making" (The Federalist 1). "His father James Madison Sr. one of the wealthiest landowner's of the area managed a large Piedmont farm, and married late to Nelly Conway in 1749." "There were eleven children born in all to the Madison family, only seven survived to adultho...   [tags: Papers]

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James Madison

- James Madison James Madison was born in 1751 and died in 1836. He was the fourth president of the United States (1809-1817). Madison worked for American independence, helped to establish the government of the new nation, and went on to participate in that government as congressman, secretary of state, and president. Madison's work on the Constitution of the United States gave him his best opportunity to exercise his great talents and is generally considered his most valuable contribution. More than any other person, Madison can be considered responsible for making the Bill of Rights part of the Constitution....   [tags: biographies bio biography]

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James Madison

- James Madison In the years following the Revolutionary War, the economic and political condition in the newly declared nation was disastrous. The young states were in extreme debt after the expense of the war, and economic growth was hampered by the fact that each state had its own tariffs and currencies. The Continental Congress was helpless to repair the dilemma because of its inability to tax (Garraty, 1971). In the middle of all the confusion, however, a commercial dispute, the Oyster War, between Virginia and Maryland was successfully solved with assistance from General George Washington and James Madison....   [tags: Papers]

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James Madison

- When English political philosopher John Locke published Two Treatises of Government anonymously in 1689, the lack of attention the seemingly radical work received in the period of upheaval immediately in the wake of the Glorious Revolution is, in hindsight, nothing short of astounding. Drawing inspiration from Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and Machiavelli’s Discourses on Livy, few (if any) of Locke’s contemporaries would have realized how explicitly revolutionary his ideas would prove to be. Locke’s philosophical ideals, exposed mostly in the Second Treatise, were more radically individualistic than arguably any others published at that time....   [tags: American History]

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James Madison

- James Madison, the 4th president of the United States, born March 16, 1751. Despite serving as President, eight years each as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, as secretary of state, his principal contribution to the founding of the United States was the acclaimed "Father of the Constitution." He played the leading role in authoring the U.S. Constitution, and was its leading defender and interpreter for 50 years. To the top degree, he combined scholarship, a keen intelligence, commitment to republican government, and a realistic understanding of politics in a way that allowed him again and again to move from an idea or a conception to a plan, a policy or a law....   [tags: Biography]

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james madison

- James Madison begins his famous federalist paper by explaining that the purpose of this essay is to help the readers understand how the structure of the proposed government makes liberty possible. Each branch should be, for the most part, in Madison's opinion, independent. To assure such independence, no one branch should have too much power in selecting members of the other two branches. If this principle were strictly followed, it would mean that the citizens should select the president, the legislators, and the judges....   [tags: essays research papers]

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President James Madison

- President James Madison James Madison, (1751-1836), 4th President of the United States of America. Although he served eight years each as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, as secretary of state, and as president, Madison's principal contribution to the founding of the United States was as "Father of the Constitution." Madison's place among the Founding Fathers reveals the essential qualities of his public career. Jefferson had a superior vision of the potential for life under republican government, a greater capacity for leadership, and a special gift for the memorable phrase, but Madison had a more subtle and incisive political sense....   [tags: Presidents American History Essays]

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James Madison's Influence

- James Madison’s Influence on the Creation of American History Introduction The decade of 1790s is the most decisive decade in our nation’s history, in which the greatest statesmen of their generation came together to define the new Republic and direct its course for the coming centuries. Of all the Fathers that have contributed to the formation of American national structure that has survived until today, I picked James Madison because he strikes me as one of the most outstanding people that have achieved great consequences for American history....   [tags: American History]

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James Madison Biography

- Like his close friend Thomas Jefferson, James Madison came from a prosperous family of Virginia planters, received an excellent education, and studied law "though only informally" and quickly found himself drawn into the debates over independence. In 1776, he became a delegate to the revolutionary Virginia Convention, where he worked closely with Thomas Jefferson to push through religious freedom statutes, among other liberal measures. The youngest member of the Continental Congress, Madison was of smaller than average height for a Virginian of the period; reports have him standing either five feet four or five feet six inches tall....   [tags: Biography]

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The Life and Political Career of James Madison

- The Life and Political Career of James Madison James Madison is most widely known as the father of the Constitution. It is a title “deeply deserved on many accounts” (Wills 37). Although his many achievements at times are overshadowed by his work on the Constitution, Madison’s life reflects a legislative talent (Wills 3). Through his interest in politics, he was able to shape the forming nation. Education, illness, and religion dominated the beginning of James Madison’s life; the experiences enabled Madison to write the Constitution as well as a number of influential essays in response to his views on the incompetent confederacy....   [tags: American America History]

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James Madison's Contribution of Checks and Balances

- James Madison didn't originate the idea of checks and balances for limiting government power, but he helped push it farther than anyone else before or since. Previous political thinkers, citing British experience, had talked about checks and balances with a monarch in the mix, but Madison helped apply the principle to a republic. Contrary to such respected thinkers as Baron de Montesquieu, Madison insisted checks and balances could help protect liberty in a large republic. Madison, incredibly, insisted that to be legitimate, a government must coerce people....   [tags: Political Science Politics]

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The Role that Logic Plays in the Constitution

- Humans use logic in their everyday lives, whether they are deciding important things or using logic for simple decisions. However, the logic used in our government is a lot more complicated than everyday decision making. Using James Madison’s essays, Federalist No. 10 and Federalist No. 51, Americans can have a better understanding of how logic was and is used in our government. James Madison was the fourth president of the United States and is one of the founding fathers of the United States. He is an important figure in the history of the United States....   [tags: Government, James Madison, Federalists]

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Analysis Of James Madison Was No Stranger From The Grasp Of Distant Monarchical Rule

- James Madison was no stranger to opposition. In publishing an essay referred to today as Federalist Essay No. 10, Madison participated in a persuasive attempt to ratify the Constitution, a document he drafted and for which he is credited as its “Father”. Along with John Jay, who became the United States’ first Supreme Court Chief Justice, and Alexander Hamilton, who became the first Secretary of the Treasury, Madison articulates in his writing the necessity of the Constitution as a remedy for the extant ills of an infant nation recently freed from the grasp of distant monarchical rule....   [tags: United States Constitution, Democracy]

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The Federalist Papers By James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, And John Jay

- The Federalist papers were written by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay. The purpose of these papers was to persuade American’s to disregard the Articles of Confederation and to replace it with the Constitution. In Federalist papers 10, 51, and 78 are crucial ideas discussed such as liberty, factions, separation of powers, and the electoral system and pluralism. According to the Oxford dictionary, the definition of liberty is, “the state of being free within society from oppressive restrictions imposed by authority on one 's way of life, behavior, or political views.” After just being under the tyranny of England, the American people sought a weak central government, s...   [tags: Separation of powers, Democracy]

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James Madison’s Federalist Papers' Comparison of the Republic and Democatic Governement

- ... In the words of Madison, “Liberty is to faction, as Air is to Fire”. There needs to be liberty for politics to survive and since liberty feeds the factions the problem is how can it be maintained. There will always be a group of people that share interests or opinions about a topic positive or negative that is their right. What concerns Madison is that these factions will grow and eventually poison the system. Keep in mind that either Democracy or Republican governments are not the perfect solution....   [tags: factions, representatives, voting]

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History of the War of 1812

- James Madison was a close acquaintance and a political ally with Thomas Jefferson; the two often met frequently whenever they could. They’re personal relation and close friendship allowed Madison to be easily chosen as Jefferson’s successor. James Madison was viewed as being unfitted for leadership, but an analysis of his actions at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, Speaker of the House, and as Secretary of State under Jefferson reveals otherwise. James Madison was Thomas Jefferson’s Secretary of State and closest advisor during his presidency, this allowed Madison’s transition the White House to occur with ease....   [tags: james madison, constitutional convention]

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Comparison And Effectiveness Of Early Political Parties

- Comparison and Effectiveness of Early Political Parties During the establishment of the United States government, it was easy to choose a president. George Washington was the best choice, he showed leadership during the revolution and was a candidate that all Americans could agree on. "George Washington 's departure unleashed fierce party competition over the choice of his successor." The two first political parties that emerged from this fight to power were the Federalist and Democratic-Republicans....   [tags: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison]

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Thomas Jefferson And The Republican Party

- Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and James Madison were all members of the Democratic- Republican Party. The Democratic- Republican Party had many standards for which it was built upon. These standards included the opposition of the National Bank, tariffs, Great Britain, and the Jay Treaty. They stood for a strict constitution, states rights, and they saw the importance in the yeoman farmers. All of these things went completely against everything that their opposing Federalist party stood for. However, even though their beliefs strongly differed those of the Federalists it didn’t stop Jefferson, Monroe, or Madison from adopting Federalist ideas....   [tags: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison]

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Separation of Church and State Benefits Everyone

- Two of America’s well known thinkers, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, created the precedent for how political and ecclesiastical groups would exist autonomously in order to guarantee a favorable outcome for both. To allow for proper functioning and success, an entity must be able to act independently without reliance on another. If one party is disadvantaged, those disadvantages way on both sides. If one party is successful but to the point of dominance, the other becomes weakened and its needs placed in the shadow....   [tags: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison]

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Large Constitutional Republican System

- As James Madison defined, a faction is “A number of citizens, whether amounting to a majority or a minority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or interest, adverse to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community.” (Federalist. 10, page 43) If we look at the world throughout the history we see that there have been always efforts by factions to get power and authority. According to Madison’s definition, factions occur because of differences in opinions and interests among people....   [tags: James Madison, factions, interests]

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Comparing Plato, James Madison, and John Mills

- Comparing Plato, James Madison, and John Mills Plato, James Madison, and John Mills are all supporters of the idea that opinion must be discussed in public debate. In my own reason-based thought this idea that through silence ignorance grows louder is my own general understanding. In Plato's The Republic he discuses the idea that there is first knowledge at the first degree. In the second degree there is opinion which is neither proven to be true or false. In the last degree is falsehood. He argues that opinion is not pure knowledge and therefore can not be pure truth....   [tags: Papers]

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The Right to Bear Arms a Constitutional Conflict

- The act of bearing a firearm was initially represented as a duty in England, up until King Alfred converted this duty into a right. By doing so, individuals were allowed to use firearms for two purposes: self-defense and hunting. In time, “kings chose to trust their subjects with arms and to modify and supplement the militia if need be” (Malcom 3). Individuals were given the right to bear arms in exchange for their participation in England’s militia, which consists of “able-bodied male citizens declared by law as being subject to call to military service” (“Militia”)....   [tags: militia, james madison, second amendment]

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Critical Review : Federalist Paper Number Ten

- Critical Review: Federalist Paper #10 The Federalist Paper number ten was an essay written by James Madison to support the ratification of the U.S Constitution. Its content deals with factions and how the effects of factions can be minimized. There were two options given; to do away with liberty, or create a society with the same opinion. To eliminate liberty was out of the question. That left the second option, giving every individual the same opinion, which is unrealistic. The main obstacle is that as long as people have free will and are able to think freely they will form different opinions....   [tags: James Madison, United States Constitution]

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The Founding Fathers And The Constitution

- Did the Founding Fathers actually create the constitution to help us. Alternatively, did they create the constitution just to protect their beliefs and so on. The Founding Fathers was an elite group that sought to create a constitution for their own interests. Several members apart from this strategic group agreed to create the constitution only for their selfish ambitions. The Founding Fathers created the constitution rather than amend the Articles of Confederation. Just because some decline the ideas of others apart from the group, which created a break in the group....   [tags: United States Constitution, James Madison]

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1108 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

The American Government Has Changed Over The Years

- The American government has changed drastically over the years. Someone that has so much impact in the way this country was formed was by federalists. The federalist papers are eighty-five papers written in the late 1780’s by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay. These papers were written to advertise the ratification of the United States Constitution. The Constitution needed nine votes out of the thirteen states in order for it to be approved. So, these Statesman began writing trying to convince the states to vote for acceptance of this....   [tags: United States Constitution, James Madison]

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The Anti Federalist And Anti Federalists

- When Congress met on that warm September night in 1789 they had every intention of adding twelve new amendments to the constitution, only ten of them made the final cut and these amendments are known as the Bill of Rights. The decision to add a Bill of Rights was not unanimous by any means. Back then, similar to the present day, there were two main political parties; Federalist and Anti-Federalists. The Federalists ideology was based off having a strong, nationalistic, and fiscally responsible government, these men did not want to add a Bill of Rights....   [tags: James Madison, United States Constitution]

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1644 words | (4.7 pages) | Preview

The Articles Of Confederation And Constitution

- Confederation and Constitution After the defeat of the British, the United States was faced with numerous growing pains as they transitioned from a colony from ties to a well-established mother country, to a newborn country suffering from economic turmoil. During this time of turmoil, the founding fathers began to develop differing ideas on how to cultivate a prosperous nation in both an economic and political sense. It was only through debate and compromise, that this goal was achieved. The initial agreement amongst the former colonies made for a poor national foundation....   [tags: United States Constitution, James Madison]

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Alexander Hamilton And The American War

- Hello, fellow delegates. My name is Alexander Hamilton, I come from New York. I attended King’s College, but I left the school to fight in the war. I was in an artillery company, and I rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel, and was trusted by General Washington. After that, I studied law. I am also a writer of the Federalist papers, which makes me a federalist, of course. I believe that a strong central government would be best for the country, with taxes, an organized military, and a process to make sure that the government will not turn out to be like Great Britain....   [tags: United States Constitution, James Madison]

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The Federalists And Republican Republicans

- Once the Constitution was drafted to replace the Articles of Confederation, the feud between the Federalists and Anti-Federalist simmered down because the decision of the Federalist to include the Bill of Rights placated the Anti-Federalists’ fears about the renovations. After the Bill of Rights was implemented, the Anti-Federalists transitioned into the Democratic-Republicans, thus beginning the conflicting views between the two emerging political parties, the Federalists and Democrat-Republicans....   [tags: United States, Federalism, James Madison]

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The War Of 1812 : The Forgotten War

- The War of 1812 is often considered as “The Forgotten War” in our American history. Schools and prior generations have not focused a lot of time and effort on learning about this vital war. However, many positive aftereffects came from this important war. Since 1803, France and Great Britain had been at war and Great Britain had created a blockade, which violated the Treaty of Amity and Commerce between America and France. Through a series of Orders in Council the British blockaded most of Europe’s seaports....   [tags: War of 1812, United States, James Madison]

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A Lot Of Hamilton 's Federalist Economic Program

- A lot of Hamilton’s Federalist economic program, wasn’t demolished by the Jeffersonian Republican’s, however, they did abolish the taxes on whiskey, decreased the government expenditures, and Jefferson’s array of the Republican Simplicity. Republicans glorified the agriculture and trade that occurred before 1800. During the first part of the 1800’s, the United States saw tremendous economic and population growth, which ended up expanding the nation. Trade exports to Europe and commercial agriculture multiplied and Americans headed towards the West in flocks....   [tags: United States, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison]

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Thomas Jefferson And The Separation Of Church And State

- Thomas Jefferson believed that a wall must be built separating church and state in hopes of protecting America’s religious liberty because of his views of human nature and good government, while President James Madison may have not supported how Jefferson went about it, he agreed with the notion that church and state should be separated. Taking a look into Jefferson’s past and how his views back then relate to his decisions, have made a difference. Between Jefferson and Madison, they grew more together than apart, but with different backgrounds in the same party, there were some disagreement....   [tags: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, United States]

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The Alien And Sedition Acts Of 1798

- The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 exposed bitter controversies between Federalists and Democratic-Republicans. The four bills placed extremely strict regulations on incoming immigrants and prohibited freedom of speech among the people. John Adams and Alexander Hamilton, the most notorious Federalists at the time, reasoned that the Alien and Sedition Acts were a necessity in order to keep America safe. However, disputes arose from this because they were many underlying possible true reasons as to why the acts were put into place....   [tags: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Federalist Party]

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Marbury v. Madison: Judicial Review

- In the case of Marbury v. Madison the power of judicial review was granted to the Supreme Court in 1801. The Constitution does not give power of judicial review. On Adams last day in office, several government officials upheld the case. Judicial review does not exist in countries that have a centralized or unitary form of government. The elected parliament declares it is the law of the land. Halsema Proposal to Netherlands has taken the initiative to start the process of judicial review. President John Adams and the Federalist lost the election to Thomas Jefferson....   [tags: Marbury v. Madison]

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The Similarities Between Mason and Madison

- ... He preferred a national government with a strong central body, which left less power for the States. Madison thought that the States should have less power because he was worried about other’s actions. In his Federalist No. 10, Madison expresses his concern about factions corrupting the government’s actions. “These must be chiefly, if not wholly, effects of the unsteadiness and injustice with which a factious spirit has tainted our public demonstrations.” Madison also says that democracies that are comprised of a smaller number of citizens are more susceptible to become corrupt because of their citizens....   [tags: Bill of Rights, influential persons in government]

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The Case Of Marbury V. Madison

- The case of Marbury v. Madison was a monumental United States Supreme Court case. It is the case to which judicial review came to be. The case was brought to the Supreme Court by William Marbury against James Madison. It was a critical ruling based on interpretation, and still impacts modern law. William Marbury was appointed to be Justice of the Peace in the District of Columbia, by President John Adams. However, President Adams failed to finalize his commission before leaving office. James Madison then refused to issue the documents....   [tags: Supreme Court of the United States]

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The Case of Marbury v. Madison

- ... Adams signed the appointment and Marshall sealed it thereby giving Marbury legal right to the office he was appointed to. Therefore, denying delivery of the appointment to him was a violation of his rights and the law provides him remedy. The third question was to determine whether the Supreme Court had the authority to review acts of Congress for their constitutionality. The Court decided that it did have such authority to determine whether laws were unconstitutional and void. The judiciary has the duty to interpret the law and determine if a law violates any part of the Constitution....   [tags: supreme court, jurisdiction , congress]

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The Marbury Versus Madison Case

- The Marbury versus Madison case of 1803 irrefutably remains one of the most significant cases in history of the Supreme Court, because it was the first United States Supreme Court case to utilize the principle known as judicial review (History.com Staff, 2009). This principle gives the Judicial Branch of the government, in particular the federal courts, the power to declare an act of Congress null and void if they find that it conflicts with the Constitution of the United States. This mandate, by Chief Justice John Marshall, would become a point of contention that places the Supreme Court on par with not only Congress, but the Executive Branch of the government as well....   [tags: Supreme Court of the United States, Law]

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1117 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

The Case Marbury V. Madison

- Judicial Assignment The United States was founded on the principle that the law not man governed, the law being manifested in the Constitution which in 1787 was ratified as the supreme law of the land. Its success is due in large part to the vagueness and relative freedom it allows in interpreting its meaning, having very limited explicit passages. Such vagueness extends to the basic principle of enforcing the laws of the country which although agreed upon by the states, nevertheless provides no effective means by which they are to be enforced....   [tags: Supreme Court of the United States]

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The Story Of Bailey Madison

- 8:45 am "You can do this." Bailey Madison James spoke to herself as she took a seat in one of the empty chairs in the rather large room. The morning had already turned out to be a semi good one minus the fact that she was sore from the night before. It had been while since she had, had sex with Calahan and sex like that rough and passionate all at the same time. It was just the way that she liked it. Looking around the room she sighed thinking about how this test was going to be for more than half of her grade....   [tags: Automobile, Walking, Debut albums]

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1192 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Johnson VS Madison

- Johnson became the 36th President of the United States a few short hours after the assassination of JFK. Known as one of the greatest political persuaders of the times, he sought the “Greater Good” of the people. James Madison was the fourth president of the United States. Although he was president, he is better known as the “father of the Constitution”. He led our fledging nation through the difficult War of 1812. Lyndon Johnson’s presidency was embroiled in foreign nations as was Madison’s. An advocator of the space program, Johnson and the leaders of Russia worked things out between their two nations....   [tags: American History]

Term Papers
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Madison 's View Of Governmental Structure

- Madison’s View of Governmental Structure In 1787, when a series debating argued about the approval of the proposal of the United States Constitution, James Madison and other federalist published several articles in the newspaper of New York to defend the proposed Constitution. In Madison’s writings, he explains the origin of faction, the harm of the factions, and the methods to protect the government from the violence of faction. His view of human nature is realistic and insightful. It also helps people to understand the reason of the structure of the United States political system....   [tags: United States Constitution, Separation of powers]

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1507 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

The Court Case of Marbury v. Madison and Judicial Review

- ... Here is the contradiction to popular belief. Marshall was not a pioneer for the creation of fair and equal government, he was really trying to make a decision that would protect his position while pleasing both the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans. This is most accurately described by Robert G. McCloskey: “ a mastery of indirection [is]…Marshall’s ability to sidestep danger while seeming to court it, to advance in one direction while his opponents are looking another”(Clinton 6). Marshall’s actions were fueled by political concerns, not legal....   [tags: supreme courts, federalists, justice]

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Jefferson And Madison And Federalism

- John Adams was the last Federalist president which led to the next 16 years of Thomas Jefferson as president for two terms and James Madison as president for two terms. Jefferson and Madison were members of the Republican Party, which had principles and philosophies that were very different than the views of the Federalists. Jefferson and Madison each abandoned the Republican philosophies for Federalism. Jefferson and Madison took on Federalist views while being President of the United States. However, Jefferson and Madison each picked somewhere to stand their ground and keep some of their Republican views....   [tags: Political Science]

Free Essays
916 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

Marbury V. Madison : The Legacy Of Judicial Review

- Marbury v. Madison: The Legacy of Judicial Review John Marshall, Supreme Court Justice, created legal precedence in the historical case, Marbury v. Madison in 1803. Throughout history he is portrayed as the fountainhead of judicial review. Marshall asserted the right of the judicial branch of government to void legislation it deemed unconstitutional, (Lemieux, 2003). In this essay, I will describe the factual circumstances and the Supreme Court holdings explaining the reasoning behind Chief Justice Marshall’s conclusions in the case, Marbury v....   [tags: Supreme Court of the United States]

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1183 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

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