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Emily Dickinson and Walt Witman Clash

- ... Jobs for people who really don't have the best things, or make the most money. Here Whitman speaks on expanding the horizon for society, giving everyone the same power, and equal voice. Not just the wealthy or more significant figures of society. Emily also writes on this idea in her poem “Success is Counted Sweetest”. It is in this poem she says, “Success is counted sweetest By those who ne'er succeed” (Dickinson, line 1). Here Dickinson is echoing the idea of having individualism in society....   [tags: inspiration, poetry, companionship]

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Emily Dickinson’s Poem 422

- Emily Dickinson’s Poem 422 In her poem numbered 422, Emily Dickinson addresses death, the theme of many of her works. This poem describes the death of a woman and the emotions of those around her at the time of her passing. The first line of this poem is very interesting. Dickinson uses the phrase " the last night she lived" instead the night she died as most would describe this circumstance. This puts more emphasis on the life of the person dying and her life. One does not think of the night someone dies and also the last night they live....   [tags: 422]

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Emily Dickinson And Edgar Allen Poe

- American authors thrived in the 19th century more than any other time in history. Two central figures of this American Renaissance were Emily Dickinson and Edgar Allen Poe. These two authors primarily wrote dark fiction about the subjects of death, love, and nature. Not only is the general subject matter between Dickinson and Poe similar, but there are also parallels between their speakers. Many of their works contain a first-person narrator who displays drastic psychological states and is aware of an overwhelming presence of death....   [tags: Edgar Allan Poe, The Tell-Tale Heart]

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Emily Dickinson 's Life And Death

- In the poem Safe in Their Alabaster Chambers by Emily Dickinson death is shown not to necessarily lead to a heaven or an afterlife and the speaker says how all life perishes not matter the status of the person. This is seen in the lines from the eighteen sixty-one version. The speaker says, “Diadems – drop – and Doges ¬– surrender–¬¬¬¬/ ¬¬¬Soundless as dots– on a disc of snow– ” (9-10). The word dot shows the insignificance of all different types of people even the people like leaders. The words diadems and doges represent higher people and even these people are not immune to death....   [tags: Death, Afterlife, AfterLife, Immortality]

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Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Emily Dickinson

- Poetry Research Paper No matter how bad things may seem, there is always hope for things to ameliorate. When people believe that the future will be promising, they can have something to look forward to as opposed to dwelling on the past or the problems of the present. This hope can give a person a positive outlook on life and motivate him or her to look past what is happening in the present. In the poems “Hope is the Thing with Feathers” by Emily Dickinson and “The Darkling Thrush” by Thomas Hardy, they both convey similar messages about hope....   [tags: poetry, past, future, metaphor]

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Emily Dickinson 's Death And Death

- Everyone at some point in time unfortunately will lose a loved one. At the time of their passing they may be young or they may be older. Either way we all will or already have experienced the process of losing someone close to your heart. When you’re younger you may be scared of it more. As you get older your views on death may shift. You’ll have a better understanding and will have learned to accept it. Personally have experienced this adverse event both at a young age and older age, I know first hand the feelings the human body goes through....   [tags: Death, Afterlife, Dylan Thomas, Life]

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Emily Dickinson 's Life And Death

- Emily Dickinson in her poem anthology had many, varied attitudes towards many questions about both life and death. She expressed these in a great variety of tones throughout each of her poems and the speaker in these individual poems is often hard for the reader to identify. In many of her poems, she preferred to conceal the specific causes and nature of her deepest feelings, especially experiences of suffering, and her subjects flow so much into one another in language and conception that it is often difficult to tell if she is writing about people or God, nature or society, spirit or art....   [tags: Poetry, Meaning of life, Soul, Personal life]

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My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun by Emily Dickinson

- Emily Dickinson: Insight into Her Works As Vincent Van Gogh once said, “If one is a master of one thing and understands one thing well, one has at the same time, insight into and understanding of many things.” Grippingly, this seems to be the case with a famous poet known as Emily Dickinson, since her passion for poetry led to her gaining insight into many topics. Born on December 10, 1830, in Amherst, Massachusetts, Emily Dickinson went on to drop out of school and live the rest of her days at home with her family....   [tags: metaphor, poem, criticism]

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Loaded Gun Symbolism Depicted in Emily Dickinson's Poem, 754

- In the beginning of Emily Dickinson’s poem “754,” the narrator immediately compares her life to a weapon, “My Life had stood -- a Loaded Gun --” (754). Usually, when one thinks of a gun, he or she might think of death instead of love. In most cases, when a person owns or has a possession of a gun, that person might use the gun for protection. A gun is an inanimate object that has the potential or power to take the life of a human. From analyzing the poem “754,” the narrator symbolizes a loaded gun, full of potential, full of power, waiting to be in the possession of its owner for protection just as a bride waits to be wedded by her husband....   [tags: 754, poetry]

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Emily Dickinson's My Life Had Stood:A Loaded Gun

- Emily Dickinson's My Life Had Stood:A Loaded Gun Emily Dickinson is a poet known for her cryptic, confusing language. Words are often put together in an unusual way and create deciphering difficulties for the reader. But behind all the confusion is a hidden meaning that becomes clear, and one realizes that all the odd word choices were chosen for a specific reason. The poem I will try to analyze is My Life Had Stood—A Loaded Gun, or number 754. I find this to be one of her most difficult poems to decode....   [tags: Literature Poetry Writers Papers]

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Emily Dickinson's Poem, My Life had stood---a Loaded Gun---

- There are dangers and risks if you are a woman and a poet. With a poetic voice comes a vast amount of power. The knowledge and power women gain from their craft can be dangerous. It is dangerous in terms of addiction, the inability to go back to a point when ignorance was available. There is a moment of recognition as a female poet who uses her words with effect, words that possess immense power, that despite this power, as a woman you are still incapable of controlling how your words will be directed....   [tags: male and female roles, poetry analysis]

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Emily Dickinson's God

- Emily Dickinson's God Works Cited Not Included God, to Emily Dickinson, is seen in more than a church or a cathedral. God is seen in her poems in relationship to such themes as nature and the individual existence. These thematic ties are seen in such poems as "It might be lonelier," and "Some keep the Sabbath going to church." "Some keep the Sabbath going to Church" consists of the differences that exist between Dickinson's way of being close to God and many other people's ways of being close to God....   [tags: Papers Religion Emily Dickinson Essays]

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Emily Dickinson on the Addictive Process

- Emily Dickinson on the Addictive Process Awareness of Emily Dickinson has grown and deepened over the course of the twentieth century such that the "delightful" andplatitude-laden verses, as they were initially viewed, have provento be rich, often ironic, highly complex explorations of one poet'ssubjectivity. Dickinson's poetry today challenges us to confrontaspects of our own inner processes in relation to psychologicalpain, death, the world and possible -- though not undoubted --transcendence of it, and frustrated desire, to name just a few ofthe themes....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Authors Writers Essays]

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Hope by Emily Dickinson

- Hope by Emily Dickinson As a literary woman of the nineteenth century, Emily Dickinson wrote, . ?Hope. is a things with feathers- that perches in the soul- and sings a tune without the words- and never stops- at all.. Are you listening. Does your soul too sing a melody, an ongoing tune to which you delicately move, and never stop. Here Dickinson suggests an aspect of life, a struggle for spiritual freedom, that applies to many women within the nineteenth century, as well as the women of today. My consciousness speaks to me; a spark of hope rests inside my soul, hoping to emerge into the sunlight of each new day....   [tags: Papers Emily Dickinson Hope Essays]

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Emily Dickinson's Death Poems

- Emily Dickinson's Death Poems Emily Dickinson's world was her father's home and garden in a small New England town. She lived most of her life within this private world. Her romantic visions and emotional intensity kept her from making all but a few friends. Because of this life of solitude, she was able to focus on her world more sharply than other authors of her time were. Her poems, carefully tied in packets, were discovered only after she had died. They reveal an unusual awareness of herself and her world, a shy but determined mind....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry Death Dying Essays]

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Emily Dickinson's Fascicle 17

- Emily Dickinson's Fascicle 17 Approaching Emily Dickinson’s poetry as one large body of work can be an intimidating and overwhelming task. There are obvious themes and images that recur throughout, but with such variation that seeking out any sense of intention or order can feel impossible. When the poems are viewed in the groupings Dickinson gave many of them, however, possible structures are easier to find. In Fascicle 17, for instance, Dickinson embarks upon a journey toward confidence in her own little world....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Fascicle 17 Poetry Essays]

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Emily Dickinson and Interpretations of Her Poetry

- Emily Dickinson and Interpretations of Her Poetry During Emily Dickinson’s fifty-six years she was able to produce many complex poems that contained deeply hidden meanings. When I consider the life she lived, this is not surprising to me. She was not only talented, but she also was born into a family and time that would provide much of her inspiration. Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born into the Dickinson family on December 10, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts. Her parents, Edward and Emily Norcross Dickinson, were strict and cold like the Puritan religion they upheld....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poet Poem Essays]

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A Slanted View on Religious Authority in the work of Emily Dickinson

- A Slanted View on Religious Authority Emily Dickinson uses her poem, “There’s a certain Slant of light,” to express her view of organized religion. Almost the entire poem is written in a ballad stanza form, which is the same structure of a hymn. Yet, the intention is not to praise the faith taught by the church but to show that it distorts the true idea of God. Dickinson provides variety in this established structure with changes in form and rhythm, giving emphasis to her opinions and conveying an increasing distress and unfulfilled desire....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry Poem]

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Identity and Ideology Beyond Death in Emily Dickinson's Poem “I Died for Beauty”

- Emily Dickinson had a fascination with death and mortality throughout her life as a writer. She wrote many poems that discussed what it means not only to die, but to be dead. According to personal letters, Dickinson seems to have remained agnostic about the existence of life after death. In a letter written to Mrs. J. G. Holland, Emily implied that the presence of death alone is what makes people feel the need for heaven: “If roses had not faded, and frosts had never come, and one had not fallen here and there whom I could not waken, there were no need of other Heaven than the one below.” (Bianchi 83)....   [tags: identity, Emily Dickinson, ]

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The Implicit Intimacy of Dickinson's Dashes

- The Implicit Intimacy of Dickinson's Dashes The dash in Emily DickinsonÂ’s poetry, initially edited away as a sign of incompletion, has since come to be seen as crucial to the impact of her poems. Critics have examined the dash from a myriad of angles, viewing it as a rhetorical notation for oral performance, a technique for recreating the rhythm of a telegraph, or a subtraction sign in an underlying mathematical system.1 However, attempting to define DickinsonÂ’s intentions with the dash is clearly speculative given her varied dash-usage; in fact, one scholar illustrated the fallibility of one dash-interpretation by applying it to one of DickinsonÂ’s handwritten cake recipes (Franklin 120...   [tags: Emily Dickinson analysis Essays]

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Emily Dickinson

- Emily Dickinson Emily Elizabeth Dickinson, was born on December 10, 1830 in the small town of Amherst, Massachusetts. Emily was born into a wealthy and well-known family. Living with her father, mother, sister, and brother, Emily went through emotional problems as a child. Her father, Edward Dickinson, was a lawyer, treasurer of Amherst College, and a member of Congress. He was an orthodox Calvinist and he raised his family to be very religious (www.online-literature.com/dickinson). On May 6, 1828, Edward married Emily Norcross (Ferlazzo 11)....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Emily Dickinson

- &#8220;Best Things dwell out of Sight';(#998) describes one of America&#8217;s greatest poets. She dwelled out of sight for most of her life and her poems, with the exception of seven published anonymously, remained out of sight until well after her death. Many literary scholars have attempted a biography on this mysterious woman and poet and yet none are conclusive. Dickinson remains an enigma even today but biographical speculation allows us to analyze some of her poetry even though we may be completely inaccurate about what we presuppose....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Nature of the Being Emily

- Before the sun you rise to great heights- showing your mighty trunk in brilliant shades of brown and gray. You take a bow, embracing the wind- enticed to join in- you begin to sway. Your prominent twisted chest, branches out with sounds of paper wax- whispering among the day. Your hollow heart stirs- pure with energy of life- in the moments beat; Your blood flows with the intensity of a river- from the dirt below to the blue above- stopping only to replenish its’ broken banks. You are a power to be reckoned with, but to fate… remain… merciful....   [tags: Dickinson]

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Emily Dickinson's Living Death

- Emily Dickinson was born December 10, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts to a governing father and an almost non-existent mother. Her father was a lawyer, a legislator and a rigorous Calvinist. Although her father had strong faith in God, Dickinson declined to pronounce herself as a believing Christian in her late teens. In her younger years Dickinson considered herself different because she was shy and sensitive (Emily Dickinson’s Life and Work). Dickinson and her younger sister Lavinia started their education at Amherst Academy....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

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Love and Emily Dickinson

- Love and Emily Dickinson I am going out on the doorstep, to get you some new—green grass—I shall pick it down in the corner, where you and I used to sit, and have long fancies. And perhaps the dear little grasses were growing all the while—and perhaps they heard what we said, but they can't tell. – Emily Dickinson to Susan Gilbert Dickinson (L 85, 1852) Seventy-five years after the 1890s publication of the premier volumes of Emily Dickinson's poetry, critics still squabble about the poet's possibly lesbian relationship with her sister-in-law, Susan Huntington Gilbert Dickinson....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Emily Dickinson and Daniel Dennett

- "The Brain—Is wider than the Sky— For—put them side by side— The one the other will contain With ease—and You—beside—" So goes the first stanza of poem #632 by Emily Dickinson (1). For the moment, let us infer, as Paul Grobstein does, that Dickinson is saying that each of us is in our brain (2). Our conscious self is situated inside that physical wet stuff of neurons, chemicals, electrical impulses, and the like. Some people feel uncomfortable "that 'self,' rather than being safely housed in some form resistant to physical disturbance, might actually, itself, be a material thing" (2)....   [tags: Darwin's Dangerous Idea]

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The Poem Love by Emily Dickinson

- In her famous poem Love, Emily Dickinson writes, “She rose to his requirement, dropped the playthings of her life to take the honorable work of woman and of wife.” The heroine of the novel Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet, chooses to stand up against society’s standards of a woman’s responsibilities and pursue happiness. The novel describes the hardships and romances of the five Bennet daughters: Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty, and Lydia. Both Jane and Elizabeth, the eldest daughters, combat to find true love amidst a society in which a woman simply marries for convenience....   [tags: hardships and romances, fairytale lives]

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The Nature of Death in Emily Dickinson's Poems

- Emily Dickinson once said, “Dying is a wild night and a new road.” Some people welcome death with open arms while others cower in fear when confronted in the arms of death. Through the use of ambiguity, metaphors, personification and paradoxes Emily Dickinson still gives readers a sense of vagueness on how she feels about dying. Emily Dickinson inventively expresses the nature of death in the poems, “I felt a Funeral, in my Brain (280)”, “I Heard a fly Buzz—When I Died—(465)“ and “Because I could not stop for Death—(712)”....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

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The Poet's Tool - The Words of Emily Dickinson

- The Poet's Tool - The Words of Emily Dickinson     A poet couched in mystique and controversy--that is Emily Dickinson. But amidst all the disagreement, one idea critics seem to agree upon is the recognition of this remarkable poet's love of language. Emily Dickinson's love affair with words fed her desire to master their use whether individually or combined in phrases until they said exactly what she wanted them to say. For Emily Dickinson words were a fascination and, in her hands, they become the poet's tool....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Mortailty and Eternity in Emily Dickinson Poems

- Emily Dickinson is the epitome of the modern poet. Her poetry breaks from the traditional style with dashes to separate ideas. Dickinson, also, challenged the religious belief of her time. Growing up as a Puritan in Massachusetts, Emily Dickinson knew the bible, yet as an adult, she questioned that belief. Many of her poems seem focused on death; death of the body, death of the soul, death of the mind. Why was she so intrigued with death. The poems that embody this theme are: “Success is counted sweetest” (#112), “Safe in the Alabaster Chambers” (#124), “I like a look of Agony” (#339), “I felt a funeral in my brain” (#340), “Because I could not stop for death” (#479), and “I heard a Fly buzz...   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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Essay on the Poetry and Life of Emily Dickinson

- The Poetry and Life of Emily Dickinson        Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born on December 10, 1830. She was from a small town in Amherst, Massachusetts. One hundred and seventy-one years later people enjoy reading Emilyâs poetry. There is intrigue behind both her poetry and her life. Emily Dickinson remains a popular poet; her poetry has stood the test of time. Dickinson shunned public attention and during her life, she refused to have her poetry published. Between five and twelve pieces of her poetry were actually published (numbers vary according to different sources)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Emily Dickinson: Creating an Identity for Women

- Emily Dickinson can be described as a hermit, living within the walls of her family home for great lengths of time (Young 76). Though this may have been seen as insanity, it has also been described as “an uncompromising commitment to artistic expression” and “as an attempt to undermine the restrictive masculine culture of her time” (Gale 49). This along with her failure to conform to poetic styles of her time, demonstrate Dickinson’s “desire to defy social and gender conventions of her day” (Gale 49)....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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Writing Techniques of Emily Dickinson

- Emily Dickinson is one of the most interesting female poets of the nineteenth century. Every author has unique characteristics about him/her that make one poet different from another, but what cause Emily Dickinson to be so unique are not only the words she writes, but how she writes them. Her style of writing is in a category of its own. To understand how and why she writes the way she does, her background has to be brought into perspective. Every poet has inspiration, negative or positive, that contributes not only to the content of the writing itself, but the actual form of writing the author uses to express his/her personal talents....   [tags: Emily Dickinson]

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Emily Dickinson's Works

- Emily Dickinson's Works There is a life in Emily Dickinson’s poems, readers have found. Although one may not completely understand her as a legend, a writer, or as a part of literature books, she is considered one of America’s greatest poets. While unknown answers may not be revealed about her, secrets may not be told, nor any new discoveries made, evidence from books and articles showing Emily Dickinson’s experiences and hardships exists. Critic Paul J. Ferlazzo describes her writings: “Many students and casual readers of her poetry have enjoyed hearing tales about her which remind them of storybook heroines locked in castles, of beautiful maidens cruelty relegated to a life of drudgery...   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poet Essays]

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Emily Dickinson's Obsession with Death

- Emily Dickinson's Obsession with Death Emily Dickinson became legendary for her preoccupation with death. All her poems contain stanzas focusing on loss or loneliness, but the most striking ones talk particularly about death, specifically her own death and her own afterlife. Her fascination with the morose gives her poems a rare quality, and gives us insight into a mind we know very little about. What we do know is that Dickinson’s father left her a small amount of money when she was young. This allowed her to spend her time writing and lamenting, instead of seeking out a husband or a profession....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry Poet Death Essays]

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Emily Dickinson and Her Poetry

- Emily Dickinson and Her Poetry Emily Dickinson is one of the great visionary poets of nineteenth century America. In her lifetime, she composed more poems than most modern Americans will even read in their lifetimes. Dickinson is still praised today, and she continues to be taught in schools, read for pleasure, and studied for research and criticism. Since she stayed inside her house for most of her life, and many of her poems were not discovered until after her death, Dickinson was uninvolved in the publication process of her poetry....   [tags: Poem Dickinson Poetry Biographies Essays]

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Emily Dickenson's Poems

- ... As she dies she cuts her ties away from this world and the physical things of this world and waits for death and its full disclosure. ”I willed my keepsakes, signed away what portion of me I could make assignable, -and then There interposed a fly,” (I heard a fly, 9-12) ironically the fly shows up again. On the other hand the poem “I felt a funeral in my brain” (I felt a funeral, 1) tells us that the speaker is imagining a funeral, taking place in her brain. She uses metaphor in this line to describe the funeral as a part of her dying....   [tags: literary analysis, life, poetic analysis, writer]

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Emily Dickinson & Her Outlook on Death

- The subject of death, including her own was a very prevalent theme in Emily Dickinson’s poems and letters. Some may find her preoccupation with death morbid, but this was not unusual for her time period. The mindset during Ms. Dickinson’s time was that of being prepared to die, in the 19th century people died of illness and accidents at an alarming rate, not to mention the Civil War had a high number of casualties, she also lived 15 years of her youth next to a cemetery. Dickinson’s view on death was never one of something to be feared she almost romanized death, in her poem “Because I Could not Stop for Death”, she actually personifies death while narrating from beyond the grave....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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Pain and Sorrow in the Works of Emily Dickinson

- Introduction Almost unknown as a poet in her lifetime, Emily Dickinson is now considered as one of the most mysterious and original American poets of 19th century for her innovation in rhythmic meters and creative use of metaphors. Her poems were rarely published in Russia because most of them had religious content (to express religious feelings was restricted in Russia for almost a century). However, some poems that I read impressed me at the first glance. Dickinson’s poems spoke powerfully to me about meaningful events in living....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Poetry]

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Emily Dickinson and Adrienne Rich

- Emily Dickinson and Adrienne Rich The modernist period, stretching from the late 19th century to approximately 1960, is a very distinct phase in the progression of American literature, employing the use of novel literary techniques which stray away from the traditional literary styles observed in the time preceding the period. Modernist writers explore new styles themes, and content in their compositions, encompassing issues ranging from race (Kate Chopin) to gender (H.D.) to sexuality (James Baldwin), as well as many others....   [tags: Poetry Poets Dickinson Rich Essays]

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