Your search returned over 400 essays for "Earnest Hemingway"
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heroarms Frederick as a Code Hero in Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms

- Frederick as a Code Hero in Farewell to Arms It is the nature of the beast within that fuels our inclination towards conflict and destruction. During the surreal powers of war, life hangs in the balance setting the stage for an elite group of individuals who triumphantly rise above the rest amidst the chaos. As Ernest Hemingway illustrates in his book, Farewell to Arms, the character of Frederick Henry; an ambulance driver, is put to the ultimate test during the madness and atrocity of WWI....   [tags: Hemingway A Farewell to Arms]

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The Need for Mental Control: Nick's Search for Peace in Hemingway's "Big Two-Hearted River"

- In his short story, “Big Two-Hearted River”, Ernest Hemingway focuses on the mental and emotional state of Nick, the protagonist, who “le[aves] everything behind” during a wilderness fishing trip. Traumatic thoughts and memories haunt Nick, but the cause of his inner turmoil is not disclosed in the story. Other short stories by Hemingway, however, reveal that Nick Adams is a wounded veteran who served in the First World War. To distract himself from these painful memories, Nick concentrates on the physical details of his journey such as making camp and preparing food....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway, Big Two Hearted River]

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The Importance of Being Earnest

- It has been said that ‘Comedy, beginning in turmoil but ending in harmony, celebrates life.’ and this is the general idea with ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ Wilde proves that this comedy of manners does conform to this model. As Lady Bracknell tries to prolong the resolution and tries to prevent the marriage between Jack and Gwendolyn, she can be seen as a ‘gorgon’ because she refuses to let Gwendolyn marry Jack. Despite this, She may be seen as a heroine because she is a strong, commanding woman who isn’t passive like traditional Victorian women as she makes decisions which indicates that she has power within the play....   [tags: oscar wilde, comedy, being ernest]

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The Importance of Being Earnest

- Archer once said, “What can a poor critic do with a play which raises no principle, whether of art or morals, creates its own canons and conventions, and is nothing but an absolutely willful expression of an irrepressibly witty personality?” These words by archer help to reveal what Wilde intended to show in this play. Wilde in response to his play said, "we should treat all the trivial things of life seriously, and all the serious and studied things of life with sincere and studied triviality (2).” Despite the depiction of humor, the play is one of the best plays of the 19th century compared to other British plays....   [tags: Theatre]

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The Importance of Being Earnest

- Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest is a timeless comedy of manners in which two young, light-hearted men, pretend their names are ‘Ernest’ in a bid to impress their love interests, who both believe the name Ernest bestows magical qualities on the possessor. Throughout the play, Wilde uses a mix of social drama, melodrama and farce to appeal to the audience. Through his gentle use of parody Wilde is able to ridicule his contemporaries and attack the values and attitudes of Victorian society, such as; wealth, hierarchy, respectability, morality and self- interest....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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Depiction of Nature in Ernest Hemingway's Unfinished Story, The Last Good Country

- The Depiction of Nature in Ernest Hemingway's Unfinished Story, The Last Good Country Ecological criticism in the 1990s has declared many works, including Ernest Hemingway's novels like The Old Man and the Sea, and many of his nonfiction works and short stories as nature-oriented masterpieces. "The Last Good Country," one of Ernest Hemingway's later short stories, however, still remains to be reinterpreted as more than merely, "a metaphor for childhood innocence" (Werlock 131), and his usual "imaginative use of the natural world" (Fleming 2)....   [tags: Hemingway Last Good Country Essays]

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The Importance of Being Earnest

- AThe Importance of Being Earnest a play written by Oscar Wilde is set in England in the late Victorian era. Wilde uses obvious situational and dramatic irony within the play to satirize his time period. According to Roger Sale in Being Ernest the title has a double meaning to it and is certainly another example of satire used by Wilde. With a comedic approach, Wilde ridicules the absurdities of the character’s courtship rituals, their false faces, and their secrets. (Sale, 478) In the Victorian era, courtship rituals were slightly different from modern time courtships....   [tags: Plays]

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Ernest Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants

- Ernest Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants"      Ernest Hemingway's short story 'Hills Like White Elephants' is a story about a couple who are having some trouble in their relationship. The main characters in the story are an American man and a girl. The whole story is mostly a dialogue between the couple. They are trying to have a fine time, but there is a tension between them and some kind of operation needs to be done. The operation can easily be done and if it's going to happen it will be done on the girl....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway Hills White Elephants Essays]

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How Important is Being Earnest?

- Oscar Wilde is the author of the comedic play, The Importance of Being Earnest, which is a drama about two people who hold double lives trying to be the same person. While Wilde intended for his play to have people filling the theatre with laughter he conveys a deeper meaning. By looking closely at the characters in the play readers can see everyone is very selfish or egocentric. All the events that occur between the characters happen because they are only thinking about themselves. The lives of all the characters mingle together all due to this one character named Ernest who is first created by the character, Jack, for personal benefit....   [tags: Literary Analysis]

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Jake Barnes as Hemingway Code Hero in The Sun Also Rises

- Jake Barnes as Hemingway Code Hero in The Sun Also Rises       The portrayal of heroism is an essential aspect of literature, and every writer delineates his heroes through their ability to triumph over adversity. Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) consistently defined and distinguished his heroes through an echoing set of characteristics that form a characteristic "Hemingway Code Hero." A Code Hero is one that distinguishes himself by his ability to demonstrate grace under pressure, to adhere to a strong set of personal values and, most importantly, to live life to the fullest....   [tags: Hemingway Sun Also Rises Essays]

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Character Brett Ashley in Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises

- The Character Brett Ashley in Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises There is a common perception among casual readers--who hasn't heard it voiced?--that Ernest Hemingway did not respect women. The purpose of this essay is to examine one work in such a way as to challenge these heinous assumptions. Hemingway's persona will be left alone. What will be examined is the role of women, as evidenced by Brett Ashley in The Sun Also Rises, and what, if anything, it reveals in the way of settling this account of Hemingway as misogynist....   [tags: Hemingway Sun Also Rises Essays]

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Essay on Jake Barns as a Code Hero in Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises

- Jake Barns as a Code Hero in The Sun Also Rises Ernest Hemingway is a renowned American author of the Twentieth century who centers his novels on personal experiences and affections.  He is one of the authors named "The Lost Generation." He could not cope with post-war America, and therefore he introduced a new type of character in writing called the "code hero".  Hemingway is known to focus his novels around code heroes who struggle with the mixture of their tragic faults and the surrounding environment....   [tags: Hemingway Sun Also Rises Essays]

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Parallels Between The Sun Also Rises by Hemingway and The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald

- Parallels Between The Sun Also Rises by Hemingway and The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald                     During the decade of the 1920's, America was going through many changes, evolving from the Victorian Period to the Jazz Age. Changing with the times, the young adults of the 1920's were considered the "Lost Generation". The Great War was over in 1918. Men who returned from the war had the scars of war imprinted in their minds. The eighteenth amendment was ratified in 1919 which prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of liquor in the United States....   [tags: Gatsby Fitzgerald Rises Hemingway Essays]

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Nick’s Psychological Development in Ernest Hemingway’s "In Our Time"

- Nick’s Psychological Development in Ernest Hemingway’s "In Our Time"      In Hemingway’s collection of short stories, In Our Time, we follow a character by the name of Nick Adams. We are introduced to Nick in “Indian Camp” as a young boy, and follow him to adulthood in both Parts I and II of “Big Two-Hearted River”. Through this we see Nick develop and learn about some major facts of life. Nick is a character who changes through the effects of war on many different levels. Although Hemingway hardly mentions the war, he uses the stories to express different effects and emotions caused by the war....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway Our Time Essays]

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Patterns of Life in Ernest Hemingway’s A Soldier’s Home

- Patterns of Life in Ernest Hemingway’s “A Soldier’s Home” Is there a pattern for life. Maybe not, but in Ernest Hemingway’s short story “A Soldier’s Home”, the main character Harold Krebs finds that he needs to live his life through a series of patterns. In this story, the series of patterns associated to Krebs results in an explanation of his character’s desire for an uncomplicated life. The series of patterns can be found through Krebs’s involvement in college, the Marines, and even in his personal relationships....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway A Soldier’s Home]

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Analysis of The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber by Ernest Hemingway

- Analysis of The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber by Ernest Hemingway Ernest Hemingway is known for producing novels and short stories with ambiguous endings. In his short story, "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," he definitely leaves his readers guessing. The question is whether Margot kills her husband, Francis, intenionally, or if she accidentally shoots him in an effort to save his life. There are many points that could be argued for both conclusions, but my observations have led me to believe that Margot did indeed shoot her husband intentionally, however, without pre-meditation....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway Short Stories Essays]

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Critical Themes in the Writings of Hemingway: Life & Death, Fishing, War, Sex, Bullfighting, and the Mediterranean Region

- Critical Themes in the Writings of Hemingway: Life & Death, Fishing, War, Sex, Bullfighting, and the Mediterranean Region Hemingway brought a tremendous deal of what is middle class Americanism into literature, without very many people recognizing what he has done. He had nothing short of a writer’s mind; a mind like a vacuum cleaner that swept his life experiences clean, picking up any little thing, technique, or possible subject that might be of use (Astro 3). From the beginning, Hemingway had made a careful and conscientious formula for the art of the novel (Hoffman 142)....   [tags: Hemingway Themes Literature Essays]

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Essay About Love in Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises

- Love in The Sun Also Rises             In the novel The Sun Also Rises,  Ernest Hemingway describes a couple who share a very strange and distant kind of love for each other. This story takes place immediately after World War I, a time of great hardship. This hardship results in a digression of values both morally and socially. The love that Brett and Jake share is symbolic of the general decline in values in that they tolerate behaviors in one another that would have been previously considered unacceptable.              It is clear that Lady Brett Ashley is anything but a lady....   [tags: Hemingway Sun Also Rises Essays]

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Ernest Hemningway as a Paradox

- This sentence is a lie. Is the statement a lie because it states that it is. Or is the sentence true because it is lying about it being a lie. Is there even a correct interpretation of this sentence. This sentence is a paradox. A paradox is an expression or situation that contradicts itself without a defined answer or opinion. Many great writers like to use paradoxes because the reader thinks more about the text. One of the greatest writers of all time; Ernest Hemingway loves to use this in his works....   [tags: Traits, Irony, Life Events]

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The Sun Also Rises, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, and The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber by Ernest Hemingway

- The Sun Also Rises, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, and The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber by Ernest Hemingway In the short story, The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, author Ernest Hemingway introduces the reader to the Macombers, a loveless married couple who is on a hunting safari in Africa. After an episode in which Francis runs away from a lion that he is hunting, all of the couple’s problems become exposed. His wife Margot is cold and callous to Francis because of his cowardice. The fragility of their relationship is further exposed by the presence of their guide and professional hunter Robert Wilson....   [tags: Code Grace Hemingway Essays]

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Ernest Hemingway's Code Hero in For Who The Bell Tolls and A Farewell To Arms

- Ernest Hemingway's Code Hero in For Who The Bell Tolls and A Farewell To Arms They were American innocents negotiating the river of life wherever it took them: to Italy, to Spain, to Africa, to the Caribbean, wounded men laughing through the pain, sometimes risking their skins but never sacrificing their honor. It was a river into which countless writers would thrust their paddles.(Papa) Ernest Hemingway is arguably one of the most important writers in American history. Though this is disputed, Hemingway has undoubtedly had a major influence on contemporary American literature....   [tags: Bell Tolls Farewell Arms Hemingway Essays]

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Comparing Hills Like White Elephans by Ernest Hemingway and Babylon Revisited by F. Scott Fitzgerald

- Comparing Hills Like White Elephans by Ernest Hemingway and Babylon Revisited by F. Scott Fitzgerald At first glance it seems that the two short stories “Hills Like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway and “Babylon Revisited” by F. Scott Fitzgerald have absolutely nothing in common other than being written by two famous American authors in the 1920s....   [tags: Compare Contrast Fitzgerald Hemingway]

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Ernest Hemingway's Big Two-Hearted River and Sigmund Freud

- Ernest Hemingway's Big Two-Hearted River and Sigmund Freud Ernest Hemingway’s “iceberg theory” suggests that the writer include in the text only a small portion of what he knows, leaving about ninety percent of the content a mystery that grows beneath the surface of the writing. This type of writing lends itself naturally to a version of dream-interpretation, as this story structure mirrors the structure of the mind—the restrained, composed tip of the unconscious and the vast body of subconscious that is censored by the ego....   [tags: Hemingway Two Hearted River Freud Essays]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By The Victorian Era

- In the Victorian era, a woman’s place was in the home, their careers were their marriages to their husbands. From a young age, women were destined to only live for being married to men of their parent’s choice. Societies only saw women as weak, helpless and incapable of making any decisions that were not about the morals of which their children were taught and household duties. Women’s job in the Victorian era were to ensure that their homes were a place of comfort for their husbands and children from the everyday stresses of the world....   [tags: Love, Victorian era, Thought, Marriage]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- The title is “The Importance of Being Earnest” and it had multiple meanings. The first meaning is the irony between earnest and the name Earnest. The meaning of earnest is honesty, which causes irony because the is opposite of what Earnest demonstrates in the play. In addition, Earnest was not honest about his identity in the play and was living a double life. The second meaning is the importance of being honest, which he realized when he discovered his name is actually Earnest. II. Oscar Wilde was born October 16, 1854....   [tags: Social class, Victorian era, Sociology]

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Infectious Death Through Lack of Living in The Snows of Kilimanjaro by Ernest Hemingway

- Infectious Death Through Lack of Living in The Snows of Kilimanjaro by Ernest Hemingway The short story “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” by Ernest Hemingway gives a look into the life of a man facing death in the African savannah as a result of an infection. Exotic locales and predominate dialogue are common in Hemingway’s writings and are evident in “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” as well. “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” by Ernest Hemingway portrays the theme of death by use of specific narration, the protagonist’s, Harry’s, attitude, and symbolism....   [tags: Ernest Hemingway Death Africa Women Essays]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest Is The Nature Of Marriage

- One major theme of The Importance of Being Earnest is the nature of marriage. Throughout the entire play, marriage and morality serve as the catalyst for the play, inspiring the plot and raising speculation about the moral character of each person. Throughout the entire play, the characters are constantly worried about who they are going to marry and why they would marry them. This theme is the most prevalent theme throughout the entire play and shows what impact marriage had on a Victorian society....   [tags: Victorian era, Love, Marriage, Social class]

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Analysis Of ' Being Earnest ' And ' Arms And The Man '

- Alice Lee ENGL 2413 CRN15872 October 3, 2015 Essay 3 Rough Draft Than Man in the Mirror Have you ever watched a movie and thought “Wow. Those characters are so very different, but they are in two very similar situations?” That is just what the creator of the work wants you to see. They have used what is called a character foil. A character foil is a double or a mirror of characters. This allows you to see alternative versions of the story play out and help intensify the work. Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest” and Bernard Shaw’s “Arms and the Man” both use character foils to highlight the conflicts and themes which help intensify the drama for the audience....   [tags: Love, Marriage, Hero, Romance]

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The Importance of Being More Than Earnest

- Every line, every character, and every stage direction in The Importance of Being Earnest is set on supporting Oscar Wilde’s want for social change. The Importance of Being Earnest was written during the late period of the Victorian era. During this period social classification was taken very seriously. It could affect working and living conditions, education, religion, and marriage. Wilde explores the issues of social class and turns it into a comedic play. He humorously criticizes Victorian manners and attacking the society of the luxurious life....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest presents a satirical critique of Victorian society, in which women are not only presented as, but also expected to act like mindless objects who are dutiful to their hyper-masculine husband. The expectation of men in Victorian society, however, was to act as bachelors with the end goal of getting married. These marriages were often not for love but rather for societal advancement, marrying into well-established English families. Even the actual marriages themselves Wilde’s play serves primarily to playfully mock Victorian society, especially the relationships and gender expectations which he claims lack real substance....   [tags: Marriage, Gender role]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Being an only child, raised by a single mum, has allowed me to understand the person I wanted to be. From a young age my mother has instilled in me certain characteristics, qualities and the importance of being a true gentleman. As a young male living in the 21st century trying to behave in a gentlemanly manner I was dared by my mates to ask a girl out. Instant rejection followed; her response “Sorry, you are just, how should I put this not ideal.” Later that night as I buried my face into my pillow, it hit me....   [tags: Fitzwilliam Darcy, Pride and Prejudice, Gender]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Jane Austen

- The novel, Persuasion, and the play, The Importance of Being Earnest, both have similar features in them. The conflict of both stories deals with social status, criticizing social mobility, and marriage within the same and different social classes. The authors Jane Austen and Oscar Wilde both draw the reader’s attention by telling how people were like in the 19th century Victorian era, then having the characters of their respective stories breaks those stereotypes. In Persuasion, Jane Austen focus on the idea of what living under social mobility was like....   [tags: Social class, Sociology, Victorian era, Marriage]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Sommer Wood Mocking Marriage “The Importance of Being Earnest” By Oscar Wilde, is a satirical play that has captured the attention of audiences for over a hundred years. Much of this plays popularity has stemmed from Wilde’s ability to direct viewers attention to the flaws of Victorian society, while maintaining a lighthearted and comical tone throughout. Although the play maintains a humorous nature, Wilde manages to touch on many issues surrounding the moral and social values held by many people in the Victorian era....   [tags: Marriage, Victorian era]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Wilde’s Earnest Satire The Importance of Being Earnest is a comedic play that was written by Oscar Wilde in the late 1800s. He believed that people in the Victorian Era took life too seriously. He wrote this play with various forms of satire to ridicule the strict lifestyle the upper-class were boxed into. The upper class had pretentious values and behaviors that characterized Victorian life. During the Victorian Era, people were living under Queen Victoria’s monarch. During her reign, “Queen Victoria, conveyed connotations of "prudish, "repressed," and "old fashioned" (Roth)....   [tags: Victorian era, Love]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By William Shakespeare

- The play, The Importance of Being Earnest, was set in the late 1800’s when a woman needed a man to make her someone. This play portrays two young men pretending to be someone they’re not to win the affection of Gwendolen and Cecily, two women they have just recently met. Gwendolen and Cecily, blind for love, ignored all the “red flags” a woman born in the 21st-century couldn’t forget or forgive. Gwendolen and Cecily were lied to and made to look like a fool because of the men they fell in love with, Jack and Algy....   [tags: Marriage, Woman, Love, Wife]

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Communicating Conflict in Ernest Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants

-    Ernest Hemingway's short story "Hills Like White Elephants" touches on an issue as ageless as time: communication problems in a relationship. He tells his story through conversations between the two main characters, the American and the girl. Conflict is created through dialogue as these characters face what most readers believe to be the obstacle of an unexpected pregnancy. Their plight is further complicated by their inability to convey their differing opinions to each other. Symbolism and the title's meaning are other effective means of communicating conflict....   [tags: Hills Like White Elephants Essays Hemingway]

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Identity as a Name in The Importance of Being Earnest

- Because this play is meant to embody victorian society, Wilde is able to interpret and criticize the high importance of social identity to Victorians. The encompassing critic that Wilde addresses in his script involves the corrupt nature of society and the hypocrisy of presenting oneself as a wholesome, earnest person when reality indicates otherwise. This play symbolically allows us to view the characters as an example of all elite Victorian society. Bromige declares that, “reading or watching the play is to observe the unconscious of the society of Wilde’s day” (1)....   [tags: Oscar Wylde, literary analysis]

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Gender and Consistency in "The Importance of Being Earnest"

- The Importance of Being Earnest is regarded as one of the most successful plays written by Oscar Wilde, a great 19th century playwright. Oscar Wilde deals with something unique about his contemporary age in this drama. It addresses Victorian social issues, French theatre, farce, social drama and melodrama. All these factors influenced the structure of the play in a large scale. This play is basically a Victorian satirical drama showcasing the social, political, economic and religious structural changes that affected 18th century England....   [tags: Literary Characters]

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The Importance of Bieng Earnest by Oscar Wylde

- Marriage is of paramount importance in The Importance of Being Earnest. In the play, marriage is reflected as the conventional Victorian society respectability, which is character, income, and status. These three criteria were considered to be the nature and purpose of marriage of that time. In a cynical way, marriage was considered as a means to an end. Oscar Wilde ridiculed the institution of marriage. Throughout the play, The Importance of Being Earnest, there is a pessimistic view on marriage....   [tags: marriage, play analysis and review]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- The Importance of Being Earnest, a play by Oscar Wilde, explores the theme of deception and social class conflict, and how detrimental they are to forming new relationships, through the conversation between Cecily and Gwendolyn. In the passage that starts on page 78 and extends to page 80, Gwendolyn and Cecily are formally introduced to one another establishing the plot of The Importance of Being Earnest. Wilde utilizes a compassionate and gentle tone as Gwendolyn and Cecily first meet. Soon after, however, this tone changes to a blunt spitefulness between the two women....   [tags: Social class, Working class, Deception, Marxism]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- The Importance of Being Earnest is a play written by Oscar Wilde during the Victorian era. It is a farcical comedy in which the main characters live and maintain a fictional persona to escape their responsibilities. To which Oscar Wilde uses secondary characters within the play such as Lady Bracknell to humorously make her the tool of the conflict and much of the satire. She is the first and foremost a symbol of Victorian earnests and the unhappiness it brings as a result. Lady Bracknell was specially designed to represent Wilde’s opinion of the upper Victorian class repressiveness and traditional negativity....   [tags: Social class, Victorian era]

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The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

- The Importance Of Being Earnest. One of the Oscar Wilde’s most loved, well known and successful play ‘The Importance Of Being Earnest’ was written during the summer of 1894 at Worthing, England. It was first performed on 14 February 1895 at the St James’s theatre, London. Jack Worthing, the play’s main character was found and adopted by a wealthy man, Thomas Cardew in a handbag at a railway line where he was accidentally abandoned as a baby. All the respect that has been given to him as acknowledged upper-class Victorian is only because of his adopted father’s wealth....   [tags: story and character analysis]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Three hundred years ago A Midsummer-Night 's Dream written by William Shakespeare was printed in 1600. In this love sonnet Shakespeare compares his one and only love to a summer 's day, and he talks about the beauty of the two and their similarities. Everything in this world is connected in one way or another, it 's all entangled, and thus it gives a chance for there to be similarities; and two seemingly opposites such as, love and war, may have more in common than what we might have initially thought....   [tags: Marriage, Love, William Shakespeare, Similarity]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Every text is an argument to the audience and every argument is influenced by a text and the audience surrounding the author. The Importance of Being Earnest is a play written by Oscar Wilde which was first performed in 1895. The plot centers around the proposal of marriage between Jack Worthing and Gwendolen Bracknell and also the proposal from Jack’s friend and Gwendolen 's cousin Algernon Moncrieff extended towards Jack’s ward, Cecily Cardew. In The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde uses the ideas of his time period, his own background, and absurd comedy to argue that the views of marriage and gender held by those in Victorian Era England are wrong and hypocritical....   [tags: Victorian era, Marriage, Worthing]

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Importance of Being Earnest: Dinner is Served

- Food is the world’s safe house. Primarily, food is what keeps the body in working order. Behind the scenes, food creates an industry that is incomparable to any other. From diners to fishermen, and from bakeries to slaughterhouses, food is known by all. Oscar Wilde takes this universal knowledge of food to create the compelling social satire known as “The Importance of Being Earnest.” Wilde cleverly brings readers into a new world of secrecy, fantasy, and power through the need to eat. With the onset of the “New Woman” era, Oscar Wilde uses food to introduce his humourously repulsed opinion on the freedom of women, while alluding to the struggle of being accepted in this previously unheard...   [tags: Theatre]

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The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

- The Importance of Being Earnest was one of Wilde’s Victorian melodramas. There are plenty elements of satire, intellectual travesty, a comic take on Victorian manners and an appealing superficial-ness that makes it a light comedy. Behind this charade of humor though lie deeper, more serious undertones. The play is a take at the extreme hypocrisy and cloying moralism’s that were distinct marks of the Victorian era. In Act I of The Important of Being Earnest, the term and concept of ‘Bunbury’ is first introduced when Algernon accuses Jack of “being a confirmed and secret Bunburyist’....   [tags: victorian era, hypocracy, melodrama]

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The Importance of Being Earnest and The Rape of the Lock

- What is the true role of women in life. Is it to surpass men and soon become equal to them. Or is it to remain in the domestic role which society has placed upon them. Whichever it may be one thing that is agreed is that, the “woman’s question” can be agreed upon in many ways by popular literary authors of the 17th and 18th century. The “woman question” is a phrase, which is used within the 17th through 18th century, which spoke about the ever-changing role of women during the time era. Though all women did not agree upon such phrase, it still defined the change which....   [tags: Alexander Pope, Oscar Wylde, ]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Identity and social class can be closely tied together. Identity is the part of a person that makes up who he/she is. Social class has been known ever since the late eighteenth century. In the play, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Miss Prism’s identity of knowledge and education leads her into the middle class; while in the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, the monster’s identity leads him into no social class at all, in which he becomes excluded from society. Also, in the play, Fences by August Wilson, Troy’s identity of being an African American male leads in a conflicting struggle with society and with his relationships in his family....   [tags: Social class, Sociology, Working class]

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Comradeship in James Hanley's The German Prisoner, Ernest Hemingway's Farewell to Arms, Not So Quiet, All Quiet on the Western Front, and Pat Baker's

- Comradeship in James Hanley's "The German Prisoner", Ernest Hemingway's "Farewell to Arms", "Not So Quiet", "All Quiet on the Western Front", and Pat Baker's "Regeneration" For many soldiers and volunteers, life on the fronts during the war means danger, and there are few if any distractions from its horrors. Each comradeship serves as a divergence from the daily atrocities and makes life tolerable. Yet, the same bonds that most World War literature romantically portrays can be equally negative....   [tags: Hanley Hemingway Baker Essays]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest by Wilde

- The Satire of Earnestness It was a play that made controversy in the lush mansions of Victorian society. Subtitled "A Trivial Comedy for Serious People," The Importance of Being Earnest jokingly criticized Victorian manners and morals and attacking the society of the rich and luxurious. Oscar Wilde incorporated his own beliefs and ideology into the play by alluding to Victorian society "lets duplicity led to happiness." It is this "happiness" Wilde's play focuses on by concentrating the theme of the play on marriage....   [tags: satire, Victorian, Oscar Wilde]

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Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest

- In Oscar Wilde’s satire, The Importance of Being Earnest, he engages the audience with a profound amount of conflicting dialogue starting with the title. The importance of being Ernest is quite a different meaning than the importance of being earnest. Wilde demonstrates a considerable amount of wit to unfold the importance of being both Ernest and earnest. The play centers on a young man named Jack, who incidentally has created an alter ego, Ernest, in order to frequent the aristocratic high life of London....   [tags: literary analysis]

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The Comedic Element in The Importance of Earnest

- A comedic movie, play, or book should have more importance in the world than they do. On any given night if someone were to watch the news or read the newspaper they would see just how dire and depressing the world actually is. It is important to take the time now and then and have a good laugh to ease the tension that the news can cause. Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest is a witty and amusing comedy which conveys real life everyday themes such as real love as opposed to selfish love, religion, marriage, being truthful and country life as opposed to city life....   [tags: European Literature]

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Masculinity and Hemingway

- Through short stories he published throughout his career, Hemingway uses the relationship between the semi-autobiographical Nick Adams and his father Henry to examine various typical masculine behaviors. While a casual viewing of Hemingway’s subject matter might lead some to believe that he was endorsing hypermasculine behavior through his work, a more thorough reading endorses exactly the opposite view. By closely reading and critically examining Nick and Henry Adams’ interactions, I will explore various ways in which Hemingway condemns hypermasculine behavior and illustrates the internal conflict of men defining their masculinity in the modern world....   [tags: hypermasculine behavior, Nick Adams, men]

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The Importance of Being Earnest and Modern Day London?

- The speed that we allow and enable our world to change and adapt is often a common topic among people. When I think back to my childhood it now seems so outdated and old fashioned, yet it was such a short time ago; showing me how fast were developing as people and as a planet. In the Victorian era, when The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde was written and set, they were just discovering cars for the rich, and railways were becoming a popular form of transport. Nowadays the development of technology has allowed man to walk on the moon and we are able to fly to the other side of the world in just a day....   [tags: Literary Analysis]

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Love in The Importance of Being Earnest

- Love in The Importance of Being Earnest Love is perhaps the most actively sought moral objective of one's life. And though marriage is often thought to be the logical consequence of love, it is Oscar Wilde's contention in his satire, The Importance of Being Earnest, that love begets bliss and marriage thwarts this course of bliss. Algernon Moncrieff spends very little time falling in love and the rest of the time striving toward engagement. Wilde demonstrates through him that once one becomes intent upon achieving a goal, the individual's motivation becomes a matter of action rather than truth....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Papers]

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Play: The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde

- Marriage in The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest is a play by Oscar Wilde. Oscar describes his play as A Trivia comedy for serious people. The protagonists in the play maintains being fictitious in order to escape burdensome social obligations. The play is lighthearted with flippant comments and offhand jokes, however the play contains serious undertones and social commentary about marriage and the society. Oscar Wilde in his plat portrays marriage in the Victorian Era as arranged for the upper class....   [tags: Marriage, Victorian Era]

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The Importance of Being Earnest

- The Importance of Being Earnest A protagonist is described as the main character in the story. The story line revolves around this one character and the events in his/ her life. In the Importance of Being Earnest, Jack Worthing is the protagonist of the play because it is his character that dominates the narrative. His pursuit to marry Gwendolen, and the conflicts and struggles he goes up against to reach his ultimate goal, are traits which develop his character into being the protagonist. For a character to take on the role of protagonist, there always needs to be conflict....   [tags: English Literature]

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Analysis of Importance of Being Earnest

- Analysis of Importance of Being Earnest      “No man is an island.” This means that no man is alone. Of all of the men on the planet, they all have somebody. It may not be obvious to them, but they are not alone. This relates to “The Importance of Being Earnest” by Oscar Wilde in a light tone. Jack has no idea who either of his parents are. Lady Bracknell tells Jack: “To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune. To lose both looks like carelessness.”(Act 1) When he finds out that the handbag he was in as an infant belongs to Miss Prism he embraces her and calls her “Mother”....   [tags: Literary Analysis Literature Essays]

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The Importance of Being Earnest

- IOBE What is called good society is usually nothing but a mosaic of polished caricatures.” (Friedrich Schlegel) An upper class society is merely a twisted web of superficial dogma amidst nonsensical wisdoms and outrageously absurd beliefs. Like many satirical plays, The Importance of Being Earnest is deliberately preposterous in nature so as to better ridicule Edwardian social life and cherished ideals. The Importance of Being Earnest is a stinging indictment of upper class British society of the time....   [tags: essays papers]

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Tartuffe And Oscar Wilde 's ' The The Importance Of Being Earnest '

- Molière’s play “Tartuffe and Oscar Wilde’s play “The Importance of Being Earnest” both demonstrate a comical portrait of hypocrisy. In “Tartuffe”, the main character Tartuffe is seen as a religious hypocrite who takes advantage of Orgon’s wealth and agrees to marry his daughter, Mariane against her wishes. In “The Importance of Being Earnest”, Jack and Algernon both lie about their identity to get the woman of their dreams. The authors use the concept of double personalities in the play to reveal the deceit and lies to represent the theme of hypocrisy....   [tags: Lie, Deception, Marriage]

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Satirical Comments in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

- The class system during the Victorian Period played a significant role on people’s lives. The class a person belonged to played an important role in that individual’s future. In Victorian England, class diversity and class placement either hindered or enhanced people’s lives. One work of literature that comments on class distinctions in Victorian England is “The Importance of Being Earnest”, by Oscar Wilde. In “The Importance of Being Earnest”, Wilde expresses the concern with the Victorian people endeavoring to maintain an upper class reputation--while hiding the reality of their lives....   [tags: social classes, aristocracy]

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Jest and Earnest in Chaucer's Work

- Geoffrey Chaucer was born in London around 1342, though the details are vague at best, and lived until 1400. Little is known of his early education, but his works show that he could read French, Latin, and Italian, and as such was clearly very well educated, and it is also known that he spent much of his life close to the centres of English power because the first reports of Chaucer come from 1357 as a page in the household of Prince Lionel before he went to serve for Edward III in France, where he was captured and ransomed....   [tags: European Literature]

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The Importance of Being Earnest

- The Importance of Being Earnest ALGERNON. You have always told me it was Ernest. I have introduced you to every one as Ernest. You answer to the name of Ernest. You look as if your name was Ernest. You are the most earnest-looking person I ever saw in my life. It is perfectly absurd your saying that your name isn't Ernest. It's on your cards. Here is one of them. [Taking it from case.] 'Mr. Ernest Worthing, B. 4, The Albany.' I'll keep this as a proof that your name is Ernest if ever you attempt to deny it to me, or to Gwendolen, or to any one else....   [tags: Comedy Irony Papers]

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Hypocrisy of the Aristocracy in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

- Oscar Wilde satires the hypocrisy and stupidity of the strict Victorian aristocracy through the characters in The Importance of Being Earnest. It can be argued that the women of the play usurp the masculine power and this itself is what makes up the comedy as it would have been humorous to a patriarchal audience. Lady Bracknell is the archetypal of the absolute height of a society woman while both Gwendolyn and Cecily’s characters show potential of rivaling this type of power in the future. Arguably, Lady Bracknell is the character who exerts the most power and authority throughout the play....   [tags: authority, women, patriarchy]

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A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway

- Ernest Hemingway was a man whose writing could be summed up as minimalistic and dynamic. While his stories at first glance seem simple, they are deceptively so. He wrote sharp, deliberate dialogue with exact descriptions of places and things. A postmodernist icon, Hemingway broke chronology in his stories and nudged towards the idea of multiple truths. In his story, "In Another Country" he uses both of these postmodern techniques. By effectively using fewer words than his contemporaries to deliver works that resonated stronger with his audience, Ernest Hemmingway earned his place as one of the great postmodernists of the twentieth century....   [tags: biography, hunting, sports, writings]

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The Curse of the Hemingways

- The Curse of the Hemingways “Can someone be predisposed to be suicidal?” That is the question that plagues many Hemingway scholars, and indeed it seems that it exists in the Hemingway lineage. Ernest Hemingway’s family tree is dotted with suicides and sudden tragic deaths, too many occurrences for one to merely disregard such tragedies as coincidence. Some believe that there exists the so- called “curse of the Hemingways,” a way to explain the many deaths within the Hemingway family due to drug overdose or self-inflicted gunshot wounds....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]

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A Farewell Of Arms By Ernest Hemingway

- In his novel A Farewell to Arms, Ernest Hemingway transfers his own emotional burdens of World War I to his characters. Although considered to be fiction, the plot and characters of Hemingway’s novel directly resembled his own life and experience, creating a parallel between the characters in the novel and his experiences. Hemingway used his characters to not only to express the dangers of war, but to cope and release tension from his traumatic experiences and express the contradictions within the human mind....   [tags: Unconscious mind, Sigmund Freud, Mind]

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Importance Of Being Earnest

- Theatre Studies: Cat One Draft The Importance of Being Earnest is set in late Victorian England, a time of social reform. Society was rediscovering art in its many forms yet as a consequence, The Upper class continued their program of suppressed inferiority. The lower classes were treated with disdain and disgust and the animosity between the groups was easily visible. Essentially, the late Victorian era was the beginning of a mini cultural renaissance, yet Upper Class society, which forms the basis of the play was rigidly controlled by a set of unwritten rules, a code of conduct as it may, in which all were expected to conform with....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Importance Of Being Earnest

- Love equals Excitement Mr. Algernon "I really don't see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If ever I get married, I'll certainly try to forget the fact" (Norton 2180). Through this statement and others in The Importance of Being Earnest Oscar Wilde creates a mockery and joke of the most sacred tradition in society; marriage....   [tags: Oscar Wilde]

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The Life of Ernest Hemingway

- The making of an author stems from their upbringing or a life altering event that happened in their lives. With most modernist authors, the first World War had changed their mentality as well as the way they wrote their works. Ernest Hemingway was a writer from the Modernist period whose impact comes from the feelings and thoughts he has evoked within his readers and effectively conveyed his consciousness through his works. Hemingway and other Modernists have changed how people view the world and what they bring into it....   [tags: The encrypted diary,modernist period, author]

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A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway

- In the Novel “A Farewell To Arms,” the author Ernest Hemingway creates a passionate and romantic love relationship between Lt Henry and Catherine. This love relationship, which is birth in the middle of the most gruesome and violent war that history has ever come to know. World War one, is said to account for one of the largest death tolls in American history wars in. When reading the novel, the author sets the setting in a beautiful place that has mountains, valleys, and flower plants growths....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Use of Realism]

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The Life and Works of Ernest Hemingway

- Ernest Miller Hemingway was born into the hand of his father, who was a physician, July 21 1899 in Oak Park Illinois. His father, Dr. Clarence Hemingway had a great interest in literature and history as well as outdoor activities such as fishing and hunting. The second of six children Ernest greatly partook in the activities and interests of his father. His mother,Hemingway was the daughter of an english immigrant. She was more the domineering type who wanted a daughter, instead of a son, and continuously dressed Ernest up as a girl and called him Ernestine....   [tags: biography, in our time]

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A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway

- Ernest Hemingway defined a hero as, “A man who lives correctly, following the ideals of honor, courage and endurance in a world that is sometimes chaotic, often stressful, and always painful.” It is blatantly apparent that Henry, the protagonist of A Farewell to Arms, did not exemplify any of these traits at all in the beginning of the novel. However, as the book progressed, Henry gradually learned how to be a “Hemingway Hero”, and he eventually progressed to the point where he completely embodied all that is expected of such....   [tags: Attributes of a Hero]

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Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea

- On the surface, The Old Man and the Sea is the story of an old man trying to catch fish to save himself from poverty, but under the surface are many underlying messages and themes. The setting is in Cuba, in an impoverished fishing village. The old man, Santiago, is a well-seasoned fisherman who takes a young boy, Manolin, under his wing. He has not caught a fish in 84 days and has been relying on the help of others from the village. In, The Old Man and the Sea, Hemingway conveys his opinions and his own life through themes and symbolism in the book....   [tags: literary analysis]

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The Historical Fiction Of Ernest Hemingway

- Throughout the twentieth century a wide variety of novels began to hit the shelves of bookstores in America. Books written about anything from dystopian futures to memoirs of recent years past filled the bookshelves of Americans during the time period. Historical fiction seems to be the most significant of these genres, however, as it teaches people of the past to educate them for a better future. Men learn from their past mistakes, and when man’s mistakes are told as tales, one is more inclined to listen if the story entertains him....   [tags: Fiction, Literature, Novel, American literature]

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Coping with Loss in Hemingway and Faulker

- Coping with Loss in Hemingway and Faulkner Although both Hemingway and Faulkner use their writing styles to create characters who no longer recognize the world around them, Hemingway uses short, simple prose to create characters who thoughtlessly avoid their problems while Faulkner's messy stream of consciousness establishes characters who scramble to make sense of their new reality. In Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Vardaman Bundren struggles to find a solution that will allow him to cope with the loss of his mother....   [tags: characters, problems, feelings, actions]

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The Life and Works of Ernest Hemingway

- Ernest Hemingway was born in 1899 in Oak Park, Illinois. He was raised by his parents Clarence and Grace Hemingway in the suburbs of Chicago. While attending high school, Hemingway helped maintain the school newspaper. After graduating, he began his writing career by working for the Kansas City Star at the young age of seventeen. Hemingway once said, “On the Star, you were required to learn to write a simple declarative sentence. This is very useful to anyone.” Hemingway’s time at the Star certainly helped his prose style of writing....   [tags: writing, awards, beliefs]

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The Evolution of Ernest Hemingway

- Ernest Hemingway is praised for his use of the “iceberg effect”. The effect giving the reader just enough information to get the point across and grab his or her attention. The tip of the iceberg are the facts that the reader must know, and the rest of the Iceberg, the majority of it - is left up for the reader to discover. This portion is uncovered by how the reader interprets the “two different meanings of a phrase, not from multiple interpretations of its thematic import” (Cohen 1). As Hemmingway’s writing evolved, so did the “crystalline clarity and structural simplicity” (158) of the tip of his icebergs, but in Soldier’s Home one of his first published works the “iceberg” appears to be...   [tags: iceberg effect, writing style]

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Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms

- Our existence in life is special and unique, but unfortunately war destroys all living things. Ernest Hemingway explores his viewpoints on war and presents those concepts in the novel, A Farewell to Arms. Difficult situations arise during war, because it interferes with many aspects of life and usually has a negative impact overall. Hemingway articulates his beliefs about life during war, through the young character Fredrick Henry, but focuses on his change in values as he experiences it. Hemingway shares some of his own life experiences about war in the novel....   [tags: Reflections on War, Analysis]

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Ernest Hemingway: A Brief Biography

- Ernest Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Illinois in 1899. He was a writer who started his career with a newspaper office in Kansas City when he was seventeen. When the United States got involved in the First World War, Hemingway joined with a volunteer ambulance unit in the Italian army. During his service, he was wounded, and was decorated by the Italian Government. Upon his return to the United States, he was employed by Canadian and American newspapers as a reporter, and sent back to Europe to cover the Greek Revolution....   [tags: famous American writers]

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