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The Creation Of The Constitution

- In creating the Constitution, the states had several different reactions, including a rather defensive reaction, but also an understanding reaction. As a document that provided the laws of the land and the rights of its people. It directs its attention to the many problems in this country; it offered quite a challenge because the document lent itself to several views and interpretations, depending upon the individual reading it. It is clear that the founders’ perspectives as white, wealthy or elite class, American citizens would play a role in the creation and implementation of The Constitution....   [tags: The Constitution]

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The Constitution Vs. Constitutional Constitution

- Although the Constitution was put in place to protect the people, there is much debate about the strength and weaknesses of the Constitution. If you lived in this era, would you for or against the Constitution. The pros and cons of the Constitution seem to be based on geographical location, with the primary goal being breaking free of Britain control and establishing a functioning government that we all can live by. The boundaries of slavery stood in the midst of forming a more perfect union. Creating a more perfect union had its’ own agenda such as setting boundaries for state governments, securities, commerce, and the welfare of the people....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The Constitution Of The United States Constitution

- The Constitution of the United States is the most important thing with all the rights and amendments are under it. Based on an article of “The United States Constitution,” there are three main functions of the Constitution. First, it creates a national government consisting of a legislative, an executive, and a judicial branch, with a system of checks and balances among the three branches. Next, it divides power between the federal government and the states. And lastly, it protects various individual liberties of American citizens....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Uk Constitution And The Constitution

- The UK constitution, although uncodified, is unwritten. This essay will critically assess whether the UK would benefit from a written constitution considering problems with the constitution today. The merits and defects of the current unwritten constitution will be examined, for example devolution and the separation of powers. An unwritten constitution relies on a combination of sources to establish a system of government, including written and unwritten, legal and non-legal sources. Although a written constitution has all the constitutional information in one place, which means there is less chance of conflict when all the information comes from one source, in being unwritten the UK constit...   [tags: Separation of powers, Law, Constitution]

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The Constitution Of The United States Constitution

- The Framers in composing their new government, first started with the legislative branch because they felt lawmaking a major and vital role of the republican government. Article 1 is the longest, and most elaborate of the articles. It grants limited legislative power to Congress. Section 8 of Article 1, expresses the basis of enumerated powers which means Congress can exercise only the powers that the Constitution assigns to it. The last clause in Section 8 of Article 1, of the United States Constitution is the ‘necessary and proper clause’ other known or referred to as the elastic clause....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution Of The United States Constitution

- Most of the American people know about the Bill of Rights, but don 't know much else about our constitution. One of the most important parts of the constitution are the rules and principles that give government its power, if these were not already embedded in there would be mass confusion on who could do what and how much power a single branch held. Luckily the United States constitution, which is 228 years old, still provides a framework for legitimate government in the U.S.. The constitution can change with the times because of the six broad principles it is based on....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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Theu.s. Constitution And The Constitution

- On September 17, 1787, the United States Constitution was signed and officially established the Independence of America as we know of today. This founding document has secured the rights of citizens for over two centuries. The philosophy behind this piece of work begins with the words “we the people..” explaining the democratic concept of including all citizens within the governing of power. The U.S Constitution is organized by various parts, first the introduction or also known as the Preamble, which explains the purpose of the Constitution and the power of government, next are seven separate articles with additional sections added to them, and finally twenty seven amendments– or changes–ar...   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The United States Constitution And The Constitution

- The United States Constitution is one of the most used documents in American History, as it is the foundation of American democracy. Within the constitution, the tenth amendment grants, “…The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” Thus, Texas also has a Constitution, which outlines important powers within the state, itself. Both of these documents are extremely important to understand together, but to also understand their differences....   [tags: United States, United States Constitution]

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United States Constitution And The Constitution

- United States Constitution The United States Constitution, although the classic American declaration of US law, is actually a compilation of thoughts, ideas, and political ideology adopted from Europe. In the summer of 1787, fifty-five delegates representing twelve of the thirteen states met in Philadelphia to fix the national government. The previous Articles of Confederation were too weak and did not adequately unify the states/colonies into one political entity. The challenge was to create a strong central government without letting any one person, or group of people, get too much power....   [tags: Separation of powers, United States Constitution]

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The Success Of A Constitution

- The success of a constitution is dependent upon its ability to evolve’. Discuss (50 marks) - June 2010 A constitution is a body of fundamental principles according to which a state or other organization is acknowledged to be governed. The UK and U.S are polar opposites in terms of their constitutions. The UK has a uncodified constitution which means the fundamental rules are often take the form of customs, usage, precedent and a variety of statutes and legal instruments, this type of constitution is only present in 3 countries New Zealand, Israel and the UK....   [tags: United States Constitution, Constitution, Law]

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U.s. Constitution And The Constitution

- The U.S. Constitution is without a doubt the foundation of U.S. Law from which all other laws stem from. Not only does the constitution outline the basic civil liberties and laws, but also protects U.S. citizens from an unfair government. This safe guard to the American people provides a special brand of freedom, and protection from the government. Though all laws abide by the constitution, not all of them can be perfectly aligned with each special situation that individual states may carry; this is where amendments nine and ten come into action, to provide a statement of reserved powers....   [tags: United States Constitution, U.S. state]

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U.s. Constitution And The Constitution

- The U.S. Constitution was written with a great vision to create a strong nation. Unlike the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution is a very well organized and well thought out document that holds a strong bases for the future of America. It was September 17, 1787 that the Constitution was created, just a few years after we broke away from England’s control. In 1777, America’s government operated under the Articles of Confederation. This allowed states to operate independently like little countries....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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U.s. Constitution And The Constitution

- The U.S. Constitution has a unique history. Facing drafts and ratifications it was finally created under the founding fathers in 1787. The constitution is the foundation for the government we have today and influences almost every decision that government officials make. However, before the constitution was influencing, it was influenced. The political, economic, and diplomatic crises of the 1780s not only helped shape America, but also the provisions found the constitution. The creation of our nation and its constitution cost our ancestors not only their lives, but also their money and a few rebellions....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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U.s. Constitution And Indiana Constitution

- To formulate an opinion on gun laws relating to places of employment the U.S. Constitution and Indiana Constitution must first be examined. The Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution states “A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” Simply proclaiming people of the U.S. have the preserved and irrevocable right to own and carry firearms to ensure safety and freedom of the people. The 14th Amendment extends these laws to the state by the “equal protection of the laws.” Written as “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens...   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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U.s. Constitution And The Constitution

- The United States government is based around our Constitution. One of the most important pieces to U.S. Constitution is what lies in Article. I. Section. 8. Here is a list of powers granted to congress through the Constitution, known as the Enumerated Powers or Granted Powers, stating what congress can enforce on the nation as a whole. Examples of these powers include, the ability to lay and collect taxes, to pay debts, provide common defense/ declare war, provide for the general welfare, and the power to regulate commerce....   [tags: United States Constitution, U.S. state]

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An Essay on the Constitution

- After gaining independence, Americans created a unique government. Purposefully diverging from the seams of a monarchial government, Americans created a new one from the ideas of republicanism. Under the Articles of Confederation, the power was given to the states as opposed to a centralized government. However, this made it difficult to raise revenue. Without the power to tax, congress could not pay back debts. Also, needing nine out thirteen votes from the states to pass a law made it almost nearly impossible to get anything done....   [tags: American Constitution]

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The Democracy Of The Constitution

- The Democracy of the Constitution How Democratic is the American Constitution. by Robert A. Dahl is an interesting novel questioning the reliability of the American Constitution. Dahl brings up many interesting points and queries in the novel that really strike a chord with anyone who has had similar thoughts before, including me. His main first argument stating that the Constitution is essentially outdated is what caught my attention the most, with his argument that the Constitution needs to be more democratic coming as a close second....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Treaty Of The Constitution

- In September 1787, the U.S. Constitution was written and signed. Under the Constitution there was the Elastic Clause, which granted the Congress the power to make any laws necessary and proper (U.S. Constitution Article 1 Section 8). Furthermore, in the Constitution the fear of democracy and authority was present, shown through the checks and balances system. The Federal government’s loose interpretation of the Constitution and/or the breakdown of checks and balances led to rising tensions between people of opposing views, ultimately causing the expansion of the federal government’s authority and the limitation of states rights....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Confederation And The Constitution

- In this essay I will be discussing the Confederation and the Constitution. The articles of Confederation were diminished in comparison to the Constitution we all know today. Under the Articles, the federal government was weak and limited in power. A major issue was that congress could not collect taxes; they could only merely request funds from the states. The national debt was growing and soldiers needed to be paid for their service. Congress had only one representative for each state. This meant that a populous state would not be represented fairly with respect to its population....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Treaty Of The Constitution

- Bill or rights Page 2 For many years the congress have been around,During the Revolutionary the Declaration of Independence and Articles of Confederation gave birth to a republic founded on liberty, rights, and limited government, but these charters did not establish a government that could successfully address the growing pains of the new nation. The ratification of the Constitution in 1788 was a difficult nine-month contest fought in the thirteen individual states. The Constitution was ratified, but some reservations surfaced about its content....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Framers Of The Constitution

- In wake of the new government America had to form, the framers of the constitution believed that important measures needed be taken to avoid tyranny, since that is what the long malicious Revolutionary War was fought for. To prevent the possibility of another cruel and oppressive government, the framers wrote the constitution ¬ to protect the people for tyranny in all and every level. The framers when writing the Bill of Rights amendments particularly focused on how the government will police the people....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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Theu.s. Constitution And The United States Constitution

- The U.S Constitution was signed on September 17, 1787. To date, the constitution is a living document, it never gets old and it is a model for democracies from around the world. It provided America with its own identity and it is one of the causes of why America is deemed, as one of the most powerful nations. America 's first document, the Articles of confederation provided a weak government structure. Where each state operated like an independent country, as the federal government was granted no power....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The Article On The Constitution

- A shout out should be given to the 55 men who took their time and wrote out the basic rules we follow in our daily lives. The constitution. If it were not for these men our country would not be the same. The constitution has so many parts that are great and very effective and should remain untouched, but there are various tidbits, that are outdated that, could use small changes that would make the constitution as effective as the first day it was in effect. The constitution begins with the preamble....   [tags: United States Constitution, Separation of powers]

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The Principles Of The Constitution

- Introduction Our Constitution was created by our founding fathers to ensure that the rights that for would never be infringed upon by anyone, especially the government. The drafters of the Constitution drew from previous documents and experience to make a statement that would govern not only the people, but the individual governments as well. Just as the Constitution guarantees our citizens rights, it also allocates specific rights to the states and federal governments. It also dictates when one may overrule the other....   [tags: Separation of powers, United States Constitution]

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The American State And The Constitution

- Chapter nine of Enduring Debate talks about how the American opinion poll plays role in constructing the government and how the media has affected the American politics. The public polling promotes democracy by allowing citizens to give their views concerning issues in government. The opinion polls also keep the government on toes. The main ideas are based on the founding of the American state and the constitution. Constitutionalism is based on the concept of the rule of law and limited authority....   [tags: United States Constitution, Constitution]

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The Constitutional Convention Of The Constitution

- On May 25, 1787 the constitutional convention began at the Independence Hall in Philadelphia in order to amend the Articles of Confederation. It was apparent to the framers of the Constitution that the Articles of Confederation lacked central authority over foreign and domestic commerce, threw many conflicts over time after the Revolutionary War. This wouldn’t be a harmonious amendment either. Between the Federalists and the Anti – Federalist they spent the entire summer creating a new government unlike any before....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitutional Amendments Of The Constitution

- The Constitution is made up of twenty-five different Amendments. In this paper I will be talking about the first Ten Amendments of the Constitution. The Constitutional Amendments are made to protect the people from both the government and the law. The Constitutional Amendments explains the rights the people have that can’t be taken from the government. The First Amendment of the Constitutional protects the rights of the people when it comes to the freedom of speech, press, and religion. An example of this in a court case would be Sandul v....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Haudenosaunee Constitution And Its Influence Of The Us Constitution

- The Haudenosaunee Constitution and its influence of the US Constitution It has long been taught that the first constitution and the idea of a representative government first came into existence with the creation of the United States’ constitution. However, six hundred years prior to that creation, a group of native tribes came together and forged the America’s true first constitution. Through this creation, a powerful nation, known as the Haudenosaunee, or known to Europeans as the Iroquois Nation, became an important part in the shaping of the Americas....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution And The Law Of The Land

- Unlike many other foundational documents written by other counties, the US Constitution has held strong from the start. The Constitution is at the center of our everyday lives and is the reason we are able to live with the freedom and security that we do. As the Constitutions author, contents, and effect on the US are evaluated it is very clear why America holds so strongly to the foundation the Constitution set in place. The Constitution is responsible for establishing and distinguishing the powers of the presidency, Congress, and the court system....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Texas Constitution

- The Texas Constitution is a document that describes the structure and purpose of the government in Texas. It took effect in February 15, 1876 and is amongst the longest state constitutions in the United States. It is the sixth constitution since claiming their independence from Mexico in 1836. Texas joined the United States under the Constitution of 1845 with provisions. Those provisions included allowing Texas to enter the union and begin the first U.S. statehood constitution. In 1861 Texas amended to transfer their statehood to the Confederacy....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The Constitution Is The Supreme Law Of The Land

- The Constitution created a government of limited and expressed powers. The Constitution is the supreme law of the land. It was written to make good government and laws, and to provide freedom to all, thus creating a healthy nations. The Articles of the Constitution express the roles and duties each part of the government has. It also separates power between the federal and state governments.The founding fathers knew that as time changes, so do the needs of society and the government needs to address this change....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution

- The founding fathers composed the United State 's first constitution, the Articles of Confederation, which was put into effect in 1781. Moreover, this constitution was known as the “league of friendship” and had major faults embedded within it. Consequently, these major faults lead to the formulation of a new constitution, the United States Constitution, which was put into effect in 1789, in which we still use today. The constitutions are both similar in retrospect but when one compares them directly the differences out lay the similarities....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution

- Even though the US constitution’s history dates back to 1787, the constitution was not the original document that governed the country. Before the constitution was created, the Articles of Confederation guided the country. The Articles of Confederation was created by the continental congress after the United States declared independence from Britain to describe the functions of our national government. Unfortunately, the Articles of Confederation had defective qualities and lacked the ability to really be the backbone of the United States....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Texas Constitution Should Be Rewritten

- Texas is big. From the size of the state, to our trucks, and to our pride, there are countless examples of why “everything is bigger in Texas”. Even our state constitution is bigger. With approximately 87,000 words and 474 amendments, the current Texas Constitution of 1876 is one of the longest state constitutions in the United States. Compared to the United States Constitution with only 4,400 words and 27 amendments, one wonders how the Texas state and local governments can operate efficiently with such an overwhelming document....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Bill Of Rights And The Constitution

- In 1789 the United states created the Bill of Rights to the Constitution after they gained independence from the British. Then in 1791 They added the amendments to the Constitution. There are many similarities to the Bill of Rights and the amendments in the Constitution but many people have a misconception that they are the same. There are some differences between the two and let’s see what are the difference in the two. The Bill of Rights the first ten amendments to the US Constitution, ratified in 1791 and guaranteeing such rights as the freedoms of speech, assembly, and worship....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution Is Not The Same One?

- Good afternoon everyone. I’d like to start by saying I am truly honored to be here in order to address what has happened to our Constitution over the last couple hundred years. Mr. Franklin and the other delegates, our nation has changed very much since the time you drafted the Constitution. We’ve had plenty of time to test the limits you established with the creation of the Constitution. We’ve also had time to discover topics and concerns our society has that you did not address in the Constitution....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution

- The Article of Confederation was approved by congress (Nov. 15, 1777) and was ratified by the states on March 1, 1781. The attempt by a new country to unite itself and form a national government. “The articles of Confederation and the Constitution” www.Historynet.org the new Constitution was rewritten in 1787 in Independence Hall. The new Constitution is unified with a lot more power. The differences between the Constitution and the Articles of confederation is the way they are set up, the articles is unicameral legislature which refers to as congress....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Shaping of the U.S. Constitution

- In the initial years of the United States a meeting of delegates appointed by the several states met for the sole purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation. The result of this meeting was the creation of the U.S. Constitution that would soon become the ultimate directive for both Federal and State Governments. Since its birth it has been revised, amended, and ratified in order to solidify the allocation of power between the separate branches of government. Although this may be the case, distribution of the powers has been disputed ever since the formation of the Constitution....   [tags: U.S. constitution, nullification crisis]

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The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution

- The article of confederation is the very first constitution that was written by early colonists and was adopted by Congress in 1981. Because of their experience from British, they feared strong national governments and needed something to hold their states together to protect them from future attacks. They also hoped to make a strong economy by trading with each other and foreign lands. This and other reasons brought a need for a stronger federal government and this led to Constitutional Convention of 1787....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Rights Of The United States Constitution

- Growing up as an American citizen, one is normally taught their rights in each and every history or government class. However, knowing the name and brief purpose of an American right is completely different than knowing its history, background, and how it affects the country today. In America, our rights are listed in the Bill of Rights, which is the first ten Amendments to the United States Constitution. The second Amendment to the Constitution of the United States involves the right to bear arms....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Convention Of The United States Constitution

- Philadelphia convention of 1787 lasted from May 25, to September 17 where the founding fathers worked to create a new government that was more equipped than any other type of government before its time. This piece of work is now known as the United States Constitution. The Philadelphia convention stemmed from the poorly effective Articles of Confederation which the States operated on before hand. This poorly written document allowed the states to operate with complete free reign and left little authority to the central government....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution Of The United States

- Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution of the United States reads “And to make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof” (Constitution (1787), 2015). The ability for the federal government to “bend” the laws to accommodate the needs of the people are what make people leery of a national government with too much power....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution And Bill Of Rights

- The Constitution and Bill of Rights The Constitutional Convention was a mix of highly influential, and lesser so influential individuals. Less than a year after these individuals gathered in 1787 to suggest finite reforms to the Articles of Confederation a far more powerful national government would be replacing it (Paletz, Owen and Cook 55). The American Constitution and Bill of Rights established the foundations of American politics through initiating the first ten amendments which illustrate the civil liberties that human beings are entitled to, and as a result of the Constitutional Convention a document-the American Constitution-that advocated for a much more powerful government than th...   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The First Ten Amendments Of The Constitution

- Were the US Constitution and its first ten amendments when it was first ratified in the beginnings of America for slavery or slavery. Perhaps the founders were looking into the future of their young, beloved country believed that slavery was not going to be around for the long term. I believe that the Founders of America believed that slavery was going to die a natural death. They believed that slavery was not going to be around for the eternity of the existence of America. Maybe the country was preparing to eliminate slavery, but they were not ready for the consequences quite yet....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution Of The United States

- By looking to the United States government structure, there are three kinds of government, the Federal government, the State government, and the Local government. The Constitution of the United States divides the part of federal government into three distinct branches, the Executive, the Legislature, and the Judiciary. Article 1 of the Constitution sets that the United State Congress is the legislative branch of the U.S. government. This branch consists of the Senate and House of Representatives, where the laws of the country are made....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution And The United States

- About two hundred years ago the U.S. constitution was written which created the basis of the states, the nation, and the powers they have. Because the specific interests in mind during the creation of the document, there has been a trend throughout the country’s history of the country’s choices and movements in constant conflict with inequality, there’s been a pattern of the hierarchy in control making choices instead of the general population, creating a false sense of democracy, along with the federal government slowly reserving more powers for its self that formerly belonged to the states....   [tags: United States Constitution, Democracy]

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The Constitution Of The United States

- Today our country is who we are today based on an important document that changed our lives forever; The Constitution of The United States. This document is a revision of the Articles of Confederation that was ratified in 1781; the United States Constitution was ratified in 1788. The document contains 4,543 words and 27 amendments that are the reasons we can do the certain things we do today. The United States Constitution has an impact on my life as a college student living and working due to me being able to attend college as a black student, taxes being taken out of my everyday life activities, being a young woman able to work and having equal rights as men, and lastly being an 18 yea...   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution And The Supreme Court

- all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness” those were the elementary principles why United States of America decided to declare its independence displeased of Britain’s crown’s tyranny and looking to act according to its beliefs. Once the independence was declared, there was necessary laws that ensure compliance to their rights and an institution that guarantee them. It is why a group of man, representatives of the 13 states, known as the founding fathers created the US Constitution and the Supreme Court....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Declaration Of The Government Constitution

- This Sumerian Government Constitution begins with its preamble, which summarizes the main principles that influence the articles that follow it. There is a few references paying homage to God because of the strong Islamic presence in the country. The ideas of universal suffrage and anti-discrimination are included as a means to show the more prevalent ideas of a democracy. Language of a more unified government is added to show that the central government shall be powerful and not one that allows more power to be given to the states making them prone to disobeying federal law....   [tags: United States Constitution, Democracy]

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Clinton 's Attack On The Constitution

- Clinton’s Attack on The Constitution Not all American people were a fan of the Constitution. There were many flaws with the proposed Constitution that turned people off of the document. George Clinton was one of the people who disliked the Constitution immensely. Clinton wrote a paper, under a pseudonym, entitled “An Attack on the Proposed Federal Constitution”, in which he further explained his beliefs. Clinton, dubbed an “antifederalist”, believed the country would fail with one government controlling all of the power....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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Why The Constitution Was Essential For The Nation

- The Need for a Stricter Campaign Finance System in America In 1787, Americaś Founding Fathers decided that it was time to create the United States´ (U.S.) Constitution, the most important - yet controversial - document in our nation. After the frivolous Articles of Confederation proved the weaknesses of the federal government, our Founding Fathers came to the realization that the need for a strong federal government was vital, while maintaining a democracy that was representative for the people....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution Of The United States

- The Constitution of the United States is an intricate document, that has influenced and shaped many newly formed Democratic nations. Many people believe that the ideas in the American Constitution are all novel and original, but that is untrue. The roots of American Constitutionalism are found in the historical paradigms of Western tradition. The fact is, constitutional doctrines were long developed and put into use long before the birth of America. The Greeks, the Romans, the English, and even the Colonialist in the New World all formed constitutional doctrines that would later influence the Founding Fathers of the American Constitution....   [tags: United States Constitution, Democracy]

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The Constitution Of The United States

- In the New World problems rose with the Articles of Confederation, and a solution to the weaknesses and issues of the Articles came as the Constitution of the United States. During the Annapolis Convention in 1786, people came to replace the Articles of Confederation by presenting three proposals. Ratification of the Constitution led two opposing groups: Federalist, who supported this new document, and Anti-Federalists, who feared the power of this new document over the people. The country needed a stronger government for the people, but the Federalists required the support of the Anti-Federalist....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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Necessary And Proper Of The Constitution

- Necessary and Proper “Necessary and Proper” clause is often referred to as Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution and stats that Congress has the power "to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for the carrying into execution the foregoing powers." At the Constitutional Convention, the Committee of Detail took the Convention 's resolutions on national legislative authority and personalized them into a series of enumerated powers. “This created the principle of enumerated powers, under which federal law can govern only as to matters within the terms of some power-granting clause of the Constitution.”(1) By including the Necessary and Proper Clause, The Framers set the standard...   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Second Amendment Of The Constitution

- The right to bear is the Second Amendment of the Constitution. The founding fathers of America had three reasons to consider before implementing the gun control act. The first reason is for individuals to protect their property and family, second is to enable citizens challenge an undemocratic government, and the last was to assemble as a well-regulated militia. In the 1930’s, those who opposed the act began to grow towards a federal level and two laws were introduced during this period. They are the National Firearms Act of 1934 and the Federal Firearms Act of 1938....   [tags: United States Constitution, Firearm]

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The Declaration Of Independence And Constitution

- The Declaration of Independence and Constitution’s treatment of equality are different. Let’s start with the differences, the Declaration of Independence is the only document that uses the word equality. It does not have any real legal power. The Constitution add the bill of rights in 1789 and was written by James Madison. Within those bill of rights it states the rights of people and that everyone would not be deprived of “life, liberty or property”. The thing the Constitution missed is that in the 1700’s when it was first written it did not apply to everyone....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Rights Of The United States Constitution

- The First Amendment is included in the Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution. The soul purpose of the Bill of Rights was to limit the powers of the federal government. The First Amendment is perhaps the largest and most famous of the Bill of Rights. The first amendment has many parts to it, but all parts ensure the people their right to freedom in the United States. The freedoms of religion, speech, press; right of assembly, and petition are all included and all have their own historical background that led to the adoption of each part of the First Amendment....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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Article Review On The Constitution

- Article I of the Constitution lays out the design of the legislative branches of the US Government. It is broken down into 10 sections with each section having its own set of clauses. Section 8 states that Congress shall have Power to lay and collect Taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States. . (US. Constitution, 2015). Article I, Cornell University Law School....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Fourth Amendment Of The Constitution

- The Fourth Amendment of the Constitution pertains to search and seizure and exists in order to protect citizens of the United States from unreasonable inquiries and detainment. The exact wording of the Fourth Amendment is as follows: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized (“Fourth Amendment”, 2014., p....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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The U.S. Constitution and Slavery

- The US constitution was written with great vision to create strong nation. The bill of right were written, it provide all humans with rights. The writers of the constitution we hypocrites, they didn’t abide by what they preached. Thomas Jefferson wrote himself “ all men are created equal” but he owned slaves. The founding father didn’t look or even think about slavery when they wrote the constitution. They were pre-occupied in getting the southern state to join the union and sign the new constitution....   [tags: USA, constitution, slavery, history, ]

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The Second Amendment Of Theu.s. Constitution

- The Fourth Amendment of the U.S Constitution provides protection to the people against unreasonable searches and seizures. The exclusionary rule was a judicial precedence that made evidence obtained in violation of the US Constitution inadmissible in federal, state and local courts. Its primary focus being to discourage illegal or inappropriate law enforcement investigation practices. This ruling applies not only to evidence obtained directly from an illegal search or seizure, but also branches out to cover evidence indirectly obtained known as fruit of the poisonous tree....   [tags: United States Constitution, Jury]

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The Virginia Constitution And The United States

- The purpose of a constitution was to remove the royal authority 's institution and still govern the people with a popular sovereignty. Each colony developed their own constitution in different ways based on the economic, political, freedom, and social demands of the people as well as the states ' experiences. The Virginia constitution and the Massachusetts constitution were the two of the many states that created a constitution. Both of the constitutions have their similarity and difference, but they are more in common....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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Ratification Of The U.s. Constitution

- Analyze the major concerns generated by the writing and ratification of the U.S. Constitution. (1786-1792) The Constitution had to be ratified by the states before it went into full effect; however, states had different ideas and hopes for their new government, so a national debate over ratifying the constitution sparked. In general, there were two big parties that had opposing ideas; the federalists supported the constitution, and the anti-federalists did not support this fairly new document. Additionally, the constitution needed 9 out of 13 states to sign off the Constitution before it became official, but in order for the Articles of Confederation to be amended there had to be a united c...   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The American Constitution Amendment Version

- Introduction The American Constitution amendment version characterizes the 27 alterations in far reaching sections which contains exhaustive stories on the procedure behind every amendment and it additionally incorporates a significant gathering of steady materials for occasion daily paper articles, Supreme Court cases and government reports in each part. In each amendment part there is a one of a kind segment alluded to as America at That Time, which gives a glance at what was going on in America at the time the amendments were proposed, talked about and voted on....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Conflict Over The Constitution

- Feniben Patel “The Conflict over the Constitution” The United States is known as the land of freedom, which permits, everyone to have their own opinions, and allows everyone to be able to convey them to others, this is permitted by the Constitution. The founding fathers had many contrasting point of views, regarding the formation of the Constitution. Patrick Henry, and James Madison had very diverse point of view, with regards to the government of the recently independent colonies. The United States government is based on federalism....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Constitution And Political Parties

- The Palauan constitution allows the people over 18 years of age to vote in the national and state elections . There are no political parties in Palau and there is no law to prevent the formation of political parties . Thus, all candidates are running as independents. According to Veenendaal (2013) , the population size of the Republic of Palau, and its cultural background is the primary reason for the country not having a political party. Their small population size allows the people to easily communicate with politicians without going through the party organization, resulting in greater awareness about the people’s preferences....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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Unwritten Vs. Unwritten Constitution

- Constitution is body of principles by which a state or organization is governed, especially in relation to the rights of the people it . Constitution is classified into written and unwritten, flexible and rigid or federal and unitary etc. Therefore, some bodies of constitutional law have single documents and bring up written constitutions. Bodies of written constitutions were selected by the people at a particular period in history and other bodies of principles made in different sources and brings up un-codified or unwritten constitutions such as UK constitution....   [tags: Law, Separation of powers, Constitution]

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Is The Constitution Still Valued Today?

- Is the Constitution still valued today. The United States Constitution is arguably considered one of the nation’s most influential documents in America’s history. This centuries old document has not only guided the United States to becoming a successful society, but has also helped other nations in the forming of their own governments. Although, there has recently been a great deal of controversy as to whether the Constitution is still valued today. America has changed greatly in the time since the Constitution was first ratified, it is argued that the older views of the Constitution don’t necessarily reflect the views of today’s society....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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Important Factors Within The Australian Constitution

- The ideas that both Evans and Keyzer identify behind popular sovereignty are important factors within the Australian constitution, but they do not agree with each other’s ideas. This is due to his argument Keyzer pushers enforcing that the better view of relationship is actually between the people and the system of the constitutional government and their reflection of the rule of law to be more inclusive in regards to standing. What Keyzer infers here is that judicial review should allow for forms of anti-governmental expression that comes with the implied freedom within the rule of law ....   [tags: United States Constitution, Constitution, Law]

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The Constitution And The Bill Of Rights

- The Constitution and The Bill of Rights The Constitution and the Bill of Rights are looked upon by the American people as priceless artifacts, constructed perfectly by the founding fathers over 200 years ago, but is that the case. Is the Constitution, the document that built our government from the ground up, dead. Can we interpret it to fit our modern technologies. I am going to go more indepth on these questions and unravel my opinion on the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Let’s start off at the beginning; the founders gathered in 1787 for the Constitution Convention, the purpose was to ratify The Articles of Confederation....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution

- The Articles of Confederation could be referred as the simplest form of the U.S Constitution. The Articles of Confederation came after America’s Declaration of Independence. Now that the nation was free, the colonist needed to decide on what kind of country they wanted to be and how to govern it. The Articles of Confederation were formed to do just so (History.com). The Continental Congress used the Confederation to try to unite the colonies. They knew they needed a strong government, but not one too strong because they just broke free from Britain’s powerful government (History.com)....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The Compatibility Of Sharia And The Constitution

- The recent argument about the compatibility of Sharia and the U.S constitution has sparked a debate that will not be ending any time soon. While both sources of Law are meant for maintenance of law and order in the society, they possess some inherent characteristics that make them different from each on several fronts. From a critical analysis of the two sources, one realizes there are features of the Sharia law that are essentially conflicting with aspects of the U.S constitution. Fundamentally, all the amendments that are contained in the US Constitution demonstrate the differences that exist between the two sources of law especially on the issue of freedom of expression, the right to diss...   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The Declaration And The Treaty Of The Constitution

- Determining which, out of the Declaration and The War of Independence, and the Constitutional Convention and the following ratification of the Constitution, is a more significant event is a very difficult question because of the Declaration and The War of Independence, as well as the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution are both very important events in American history. The Declaration paved the way for the colonies ' freedom from Britain, and the Constitutional Convention redeemed the colonies from near failure....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The Principles Of The United States Constitution

- Paper 1 The United States constitution is said to be unique compared to any other forms of law. There are four ideal concepts that set the constitution apart from any other law. The four ideal concepts is representative-democracy, federalism, separation of powers, and interpretation (Marks; 9/8/16). All of these concepts were different from the other world governments at the time in 1787. Most likely taking influence from Jean-Jacques Rousseau and John Locke, the U.S. constitution tries to establish trust between the people and the government....   [tags: Separation of powers, United States Constitution]

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The Constitution And Its Effect On Society

- Throughout history the constitution has been a large part of the American government. The constitution is still around today. There is an argument between whether or not the constitution still has an effect or continues to play a role in our government. I strongly believe it does based on the laws and rules that are in the constitution that the government still follows and enforces today. There are many events and issues that lead up to the creation of our great constitution today. These are things that I would like to share to give people a better background that leads up to the creation of this important document....   [tags: United States Constitution, Separation of powers]

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The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution

- The Articles of Confederation and the U.S Constitution are both great examples of the phrase, “If at first you don’t succeed, try try again.” You see, the Articles of Confederation and the U.S. Constitution were the main components of what established the government and set the laws of the United States. However, the people that wrote the Articles were so dissatisfied with them that years later decided to come up with new laws and ideas known as the U.S. Constitution that we all know and love today....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The United States Constitution

- The United States Constitution is one of the oldest documents in U.S. history created by our Founding Fathers to limit the power of the federal government and protect the natural born rights of citizens. These forward thinking individuals realized that sometimes people in positions of authority could potentially abuse their power hence the creation and framework of United States Constitution was established. The Founding Fathers intentions which were deemed fair and consistent would give people the protection they once feared could be taken away....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution

- The Articles of Confederation were created to establish a weak confederacy of states to preserve state sovereignty and independence. As a result of this, this left a weak and ineffective central government that lacked powers that are crucial to the governance of a nation such as the ability to tax to generate revenue, establish a national court system, and have a national currency. It is these inabilities of the national government, which resulted in their incapacity to enact upon political and economic issues leaving an economically weak and quarrelsome nation....   [tags: United States, United States Constitution]

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The Establishment Of The U.s. Constitution

- The establishment of the U.S. Constitution was an action taken in order to supply federal control over the young United States of America without replicating the mistakes and flaws present within the Articles of Confederation. The idea of the Constitution was to better unify the states, something the Articles of Confederation were completely unable to do. Even during the infancy of the Constitution, its creators were divided into two major political parties: the federalists, who supported large and strong federal government, and the Anti-Federalists who supported reserving state’s rights and limiting the grasp of the federal government....   [tags: United States, United States Constitution]

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The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution

- The Articles of Confederation was technically the first Constitution for this new country. The fear was giving too much power to a central government as with Britain. Per Article II, “Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, independence, and every power not specifically granted to the new Congress.” (The Articles of Confederation, 2015) Congress had the ability to create treaties and alliances with other countries, create post offices, create money, and build a central military. Since it did not want to levy the taxes as Britain had, it requested funding through the states....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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1249 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

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