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Kant's and Aristotle's Ethics - To be good is good but it has to be done for the right reason. Aristotle and Kant are two famous philosophers who have different ethical theories. The theory’s of virtue and duties rest not only on laws and obligations but from what comes from the inside. Morality comes from inner strength, character and how we live our life to the best end. Aristole 384-322 b.c.e. Aristotle conceptualized the branches of philosophy and contributed to the theories in logic, metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy (book 237)....   [tags: Philosophy, Philosophers]
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1297 words
(3.7 pages)
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Aristotle's Concept of Happiness - In the work, Nicomachean Ethics, the philosopher Aristotle creates a guideline for those who are serious about pursuing happiness. Aristotle's recommendations for finding happiness are not accepted today without some struggle and careful examination. In Aristotle's time, slaves, women and children were not truly considered human; so in many cases the philosopher is directing his words towards free males only. It is necessary to understand that by overlooking this discrimination and applying it to all people, one can discover the timeless wisdom of Aristotle....   [tags: Philosophy]
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1089 words
(3.1 pages)
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Aristotle’s Elements of Tragedy - Aristotle is one of the most important western philosophers in history that has influenced our society in many aspects. Many of Aristotle’s teachings have affected our world for many years and still continue to have such a big impact. Some of the subjects Aristotle has influenced include: logic, physics, government and poetry. Aristotle’s study of poetry mainly focused on the elements to a good tragedy. Some of his elements have been used in Greek tragedies and modern movies. The Greek play, Medea, and the modern movie, No Country for Old Men, use elements from Aristotle philosophy, while using similar and different techniques but both achieving an effective tragedy....   [tags: Creek, Poetics, Tragedy]
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1479 words
(4.2 pages)
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Aristotle: The Rule of Law - A. Explain what is meant by the concept of “the rule of law” According to Aristotle, "The rule of law is better than that of any individual”, suggesting every member of society, even a ruler, must abide by and follow the law. The rule of law is linked to the principle of justice, meaning that everyone within a society (including both private citizens and government officials) are subject to the law, and that those laws are administered fairly and justly. The intention of the rule of law is to protect against arbitrary governance....   [tags: society, judicial power, legislative power]
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1737 words
(5 pages)
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Aristotle’s Theory of Motion - The scientist Aristotle (384-322 BCE) developed many important theories which modern day physics is based upon. One of these theories is Aristotle’s theory of motion. Through his research Aristotle attempted to provide explanations as to how objects in our universe moved. While many of his theories have been since proven to be inaccurate, they provided a basis for future theories which eventually lead to our present day understanding of motion. To understand Aristotle’s overall theory of motion you must first understand his classification of matter....   [tags: physics, force, false]
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612 words
(1.7 pages)
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Aristotle's Perspective On Courage - In the 1939 movie classic, The Wizard of Oz, the Cowardly Lion is on a quest for the wizard to give him courage. He is afraid of everything and anything. However, in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle believes that courage is possible for all individuals. To gain courage one must have the inner qualities that will guide the courageous. The most important out of these qualities is to come to terms with death itself. Also, there are views of courage that are falsely perceived because they appear to be parallel with one another; nevertheless they are still very different....   [tags: Facing Death, Nicomachean Ethics]
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910 words
(2.6 pages)
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​Aristotle's Life and Work - ​Aristotle's work during his (384-322 B.C.E) lifespan had great impact on society in his time and even today, he is ranked among the greatest philosophers of all time. He was a world-class researcher and writer covering many topics and his theories have provided illumination, met with resistance, created debate, and generally stimulated the continued interest of abiding readership. His philosophical influence shaped centuries of philosophy from Late Antiquity (284-632 A.D.) through Renaissance (1450-1600 A.D.) and is still studied today with non-antiquarian interests....   [tags: philosopher, greek, axioms] 994 words
(2.8 pages)
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Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle - An Exposition of Aristotelian Virtues In his Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle explores virtues as necessary conditions for being happy. A virtuous person is a person with a disposition toward virtuous actions and who derives pleasure from behaving virtuously. Aristotle distinguishes between two types of human virtue: virtues of thought and virtues of character. Virtues of thought are acquired through learning and include virtues like wisdom and prudence; virtues of character include bravery and charity, which are acquired by habituation and require external goods to develop....   [tags: virtue, action, happiness]
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1456 words
(4.2 pages)
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Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics: Courage As I read Aristotle’s book "Nicomachean ethics," I analyzed and comprehend his thoughts on all ten books. I came to realization that Aristotle thoughts throughout the book are difficult to express and clearly comprehend. But though it was difficult to breakdown, I could clearly see that it was written to determine what a human being is as a whole. To begin with, Aristotle tells us his meaning of virtues and vices. They are not just any habits that we experience, but the outcome of what we feel as pleasure or pain....   [tags: courage, virtue, philosophy] 565 words
(1.6 pages)
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Aristotle's Perception of Society - Aristotle believes that money is a form of justice, and not an end in itself. This has been a controversial perception amongst people for many years; some tend to agree while others have a different belief. From my point of view, Aristotle’s belief was not arbitrary. I support this belief because unfortunately our society is continuously being corrupted by many people who possess the money, wealth, and influence in our current days, are using their means to promote injustice. It is also true among modern thinkers that money might also be the only way to justice....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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1663 words
(4.8 pages)
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Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas - Introduction Critics have for a long time argued that there is no way that philosophy and religion can come together. In their argument, they find many a religious group conflicting with the sound doctrine purported by the philosophy arena. For those who have tried to harmonize the two disciplines, they have been met with complex questions on the authenticity and their grounds of arguments. However, the works of ancient (middle-age philosophers) and religious thinkers and scholars has had challenges too but there are two outstanding works that have gained credit from most, if not all, of the scholars and modern philosophers....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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2032 words
(5.8 pages)
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Aristotle's Four Main Causes - To some the causes and effects of things are mutually exclusive, and coexistence with one another. When observing specific equipment or even life, the question stands that there must be an account that took place before such items ceased to exist. Particularly, Aristotle argues that each thing, whatever it may be, will have causes, or types of explanatory factors by which that thing can be explained. The significant knowledge of causes allows for specific accounts to be known. It’s like questioning what occurred first the chicken or the egg....   [tags: Philosophy]
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1966 words
(5.6 pages)
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Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle - Many believe the two are interchangeable when speaking about morals and ethics, when the two in no way mean the same thing. Morals are subjective beliefs that belong to an individual, they are one’s own beliefs as to what is right and what is wrong. Ethics on the other hand are the rules that society creates and teaches regarding proper and improper, right and wrong, social behavior. Morals are internal, ethics are external, and they have been the unwritten rules of society as old as mankind, which govern proper social conduct based on the greater good of the popular belief....   [tags: morals, kant, gratification, society]
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1259 words
(3.6 pages)
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Philosophy: Oedipus and Aristotle - Through Aristotle’s specific definition of a tragic hero, it can be concluded that Oedipus is a tragic hero. Oedipus The King was written by a well-known tragic dramatist named Sophocles. This story is considered to be one of the greatest tragedies of all time. In fact, the Marjorie Barstow of the Classical Weekly says that it “fulfills the function of a tragedy, and arouses fear and pity in the highest degree” (Barstow). It is also very controversial because of the relationship that Oedipus has with his mother, although it was unknown at the time that they were related....   [tags: tragic hero, Sophocles, heroic traits, flaw]
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1245 words
(3.6 pages)
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Aristotle's Golden Mean Theory - A quote from Aristotle “…Too much or too little; and both extremes are wrong. The mean and good is feeling at the right time, about the right things, in relation to the right people, and for the right reason; and the mean and the good are the task of virtue” (NE 2.6). For Aristotle virtue is happiness, it is also human excellence and to become an excellent human one must achieve virtue. You’re probably thinking “who gives a flying hoot about this shit” and if you’re actually thinking some relative form of not caring, let me tell you that’s why I’m here to tell you why you should care....   [tags: finding a balance for happiness] 1535 words
(4.4 pages)
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Aristotle's Teachings - Aristotle is a well-known philosopher, who lived from 384 BC through 322 BC, having been born and spending most of his life in Greece. According to William Turner, in the Catholic Encyclopedia, his father was physician to the King of Macedonia, and other ancestors of Aristotle’s likely also held this position. Aristotle’s parents probably planned for him to receive a medical education so he also could become a physician, but both of his parents died while he was still a child. As he approached the age of 18, he was sent to school at the university of another great and well-known philosopher, Plato....   [tags: Philosophy]
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808 words
(2.3 pages)
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Aristotle's Happiness - With self-help books garnishing millions of dollars annually, it's no mystery that people have been looking for a "correct" way to live out their lives. This was as prevalent in ancient Greece as it is today. Aristotle had what he thought was an ideal activity for all those who wanted to live life to the fullest, be happy, and have purpose. Aristotle argues that the best and most satisfying activity is study on the grounds that it fulfills the requirements for happiness as an activity better than others....   [tags: Philosophy] 964 words
(2.8 pages)
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Aristotle's Legacy - Extraordinary achievements have been made through ancient civilizations. Philosophers that have changed the way we look at things every day came from the ancient Greek world, especially during the prosperous Golden Age of Athens, Greece. Aristotle, a famous philosopher, taught his philosophy during this period of time in Greece. Using his intellect and astounding ideas, Aristotle created a legacy that influenced people for ages. To start off, Aristotle was a widely known philosopher in the Ancient Greek world born in Macedonia in the year 384 B.C....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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1154 words
(3.3 pages)
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Distinctions and Comparisons between Aristotle and Plato - The ideas introduced by Plato on the theory of forms, where deducted and critiqued by Aristotle. Both philosophers can be viewed as having opposing ideologies. Nonetheless, Plato and Aristotle are in agreement on certain factors of their philosophy. Many have scrutinized and compared the dissimilarities and similarities of Aristotle's doctrine of categories and Plato's theory of forms. The observations found are of an interesting nature. The beauty behind the writings of Plato is to not accept what is interpreted through the senses....   [tags: Philosophy] 1671 words
(4.8 pages)
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A Comparative Study on the Philosophies of Plato and Aristotle - Plato and Aristotle are undoubtedly the greatest of philosophers that the world has seen. Both Plato and Aristotle formed unique and distinct theories about the Greek city states. While most people believe that Plato and Aristotle are complete opposites of one another, it is not completely true. For those who have studied the works of both the philosophers, the theory proposed by Aristotle is just a development of the Platonic system because it does away with the cons of Plato’s theory. However, it has been noted that Aristotle never let a day pass by when he didn’t criticise Plato....   [tags: ancient Greek philosophers] 1587 words
(4.5 pages)
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Nicomachean Ethics - Through books one to three in Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle distinguishes between pain and happiness, clarifying the endless war that men face in the path of these two extremes. Man’s quest for pleasure is considered by the self-conscious and rational Aristotle; a viewpoint traditionally refuted in contemporary, secular environments. Immediately, Aristotle alleges that all actions aim for good, thus proposing that all human activity is to be of some good. These activities attempt to meet a greater end; a chief good met by subordinate desires....   [tags: Aristotle] 1016 words
(2.9 pages)
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How Aristotle Understands the Human Being - In what ways does Aristotle present the human being. In this paper I will interpret how Aristotle understands the human being. In the first part of this paper I will explain the concept of the human telos. In the second part I will present how Aristotle defines knowledge the four causes in his theory. In the third part I will round off the idea of a human being according to Aristotle. In the fourth part I will explain the four causes in Aristotle’s theory. Finally, I will disclose with two types of virtues presented in the theory....   [tags: virtue ethics, philosophical analysis] 766 words
(2.2 pages)
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Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics - Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics explores the idea of an ethical framework based on virtues, deliberation, and choice. The key to being virtuous is to strike a balance between the extremes on either side of a virtue. Arriving at what constitutes as a virtuous balance is achieved through the process of deliberation and then action. Sartre and the existentialists say that existence precedes essence; the good starts from human subjectivity rather than from known virtues. Through a person’s choices, they determine what is good....   [tags: framework based on choice, virtues, deliberation] 1266 words
(3.6 pages)
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Aristotle's Theory of the Soul in the De Anima - Aristotle's Theory of the Soul in the De Anima centres on the kinds of souls possessed by different kinds of living things, distinguished by their different operations. He holds that the soul is the form, or essence of any living thing; that it is not a distinct substance from the body that it is in; that it is the possession of soul (of a specific kind) that makes an organism an organism at all, and thus that the notion of a body without a soul, or of a soul in the wrong kind of body, is simply unintelligible....   [tags: living, possession, hylomorphic]
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645 words
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Forms and Causes: Philosophies of Aristotle and Plato - Aristotle and Plato are two of the most influential philosophers in history. Plato was Socrates’ greatest student and in turn taught Aristotle. In time, Aristotle became Plato’s greatest student. Together Aristotle and Plato, along with Socrates, laid the groundwork for what we now know as Western philosophy and science. Plato, in addition to being a philosopher, wrestled at the Olympic level, is one of the classical Greek authors, mathematicians and the founder of The Academy, the first higher learning institute in the west....   [tags: Philosophy]
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1130 words
(3.2 pages)
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Aristotle's Politics: Man Is a Political Animal - In the Aristotle’s Politics Book I, Aristotle determines that man is by nature a political animal, and in accordance to that the polis is created naturally. Aristotle’s first argument states how a polis comes into being by stating “Now in these matters as elsewhere it is by looking at how things develop naturally from the beginning that one may best study them.”(Pg 2, line24) At the beginning of chapter 2, Aristotle claims that a polis comes out of need, but also reproduction. This is idea is different with the views of Socrates and Plato in the republic....   [tags: polis, law, humans, survive, virtuous] 710 words
(2 pages)
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Aristotle vs Plato - Aristotle is considered by many to be one of the most influential philosophers in history. As a student of Plato, he built on his mentor’s metaphysical teachings of things like The Theory of Forms and his views on the soul. However, he also challenged them, introducing his own metaphysical ideas such as act and potency, hylemorphism, and the four causes. He used these ideas to explain his account of the soul and the immateriality of intellect. Prior to Aristotle, philosophers like Parmenides and Heraclitus argued about the existence of change....   [tags: Metaphysics,The Four Causes, Soul and Body] 1659 words
(4.7 pages)
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Recipe for Happiness in Aristotle's The Nicomachean Ethics - Aristotle, the author of The Nicomachean Ethics, attempts to explain the aim of human beings by using an empirical approach. In other words, he makes an effort to use scientific observations of the physical world to explain why humans act a certain way to reach the goal of happiness. Their specific action, or unique function as Aristotle says, is the using of reason. This reason seems to be part of every human being and according to Aristotle, if it is used well, then we will achieve happiness....   [tags: virtues, reasoning, balance]
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766 words
(2.2 pages)
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Greek Philosopher: Aristotle - Aristotle is a historic and global face who in his life made some of the most monumental discoveries and conclusions in many fields. These fields are such as the topics of logic, metaphysics, the law of nature, physics, biology, and even the arts. The theories and methods he came up with were not only thought of and lived by in his days, but are still believed in to this day. His laws within these topics have held up through out the years, and continue to be followed to this day. Not only is he famous for making his own theories, but he is also widely known for disproving previous theories and conclusions that were believed to be true....   [tags: logic, metaphysics, physics] 939 words
(2.7 pages)
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Aristotle's Ideal State - In this essay I will examine Aristotle’s ideal state in order to find out whether it is rather a place of hierarchy than equality. First it is necessary to define what is meant by hierarchy and equality. This seems to be an easy task, since these are commonly used words. But by equality, do we mean for example equal property, equal power or equal rights for everyone. For 21st century Sweden, for example, is usually thought to be rather equal state, while it is however true that even there everyone doesn’t have equal property, equal power or even equal rights....   [tags: political philosophy analysis] 1516 words
(4.3 pages)
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Philosophy of Aristotle and How It Relates to the Classroom - Introduction Aristotle (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher. He was a student of Plato and the teacher of Alexander the Great. Together with other Greek philosophers like Plato and Socrates, he is considered to be one of the most important figures in Western Philosophy. Educational Philosophy “All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of youth.” –Aristotle Aristotle is believed to be the father of the Realism and the scientific method....   [tags: education, practices, child, classroom] 636 words
(1.8 pages)
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Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics - In consideration to Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle’s view of the great-souled man is that of an individual that represents happiness and obtains the five virtues: wisdom, justice, bravery, self-control, and the overall goodness within an individual (happiness). The magnanimous person is very complex and displays the proper virtues at the proper time, and in the proper way. In addition, the great-souled man accommodates to his surroundings where he is honorable but not boastful in his actions. Aristotle believes that it is only possible to attain happiness within a political organization because happiness represents living well without being concerned with others, they solely live for the trut...   [tags: Virtue, Happiness] 985 words
(2.8 pages)
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Aristotle vs Plato - One of the most fundamental questions of moral philosophy as it applies to our everyday lives is the relationship between truth and philosophy, and as such, it is appropriate that Plato, as one of the founders of Western philosophy, attempts to deal with them. Before one can fully comprehend how Plato understands this interconnection, it is imperative to understand how Plato understands truth and happiness as separate entities—that is, what is truth and what is happiness. Plato never explicitly declares what the truth actually is; rather, the closest he comes is describing characteristics of the truth (much in the same way he flirts with defining justice until the Republic)....   [tags: Truth, Happiness] 908 words
(2.6 pages)
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Comparing and Contrasting Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle - Introduction: We humans like to think. Some people take it as a hobby. While others take it as a job. That is basically what a philosopher is. A philosopher is a person that usually thinks about life and tries to find out mysterious questions, and how to solve them. Since a long time ago, in ancient Greece, many people would just meditate about life, and would sit or talk and write books about life. These have always been one of Greek's reasons of why it is so famous. Because of their marvelous philosophers....   [tags: Philosophers, Philosophy] 700 words
(2 pages)
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Plato and Aristotle's Ideal Views of Politics - Plato grew up within the spewing turmoil that would become Athens, after its failed attempts at democracy, and Aristotle who was educated in Athens under his teacher went on to mentor Alexander the Great of Macedonia. Though both had varying differences in their ideal governmental policies. Plato in his Republic would have his great city of Athens follow a monarch known as the Philosopher-King, while Aristotle in his talk of Politics would have the demos, the people rule, the very people that ruined the city his mentor grew up in....   [tags: monarch, democracy, philosophers] 516 words
(1.5 pages)
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Virtue and Happiness in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics - In consideration to Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle’s view of the great-souled man is that of an individual that represents happiness and obtains the five virtues: wisdom, justice, bravery, self-control, and the overall goodness within an individual (happiness). The magnanimous person is very complex and displays the proper virtues at the proper time, and in the proper way. In addition, the great-souled man accommodates to his surroundings where he is honorable but not boastful in his actions. Aristotle believes that it is only possible to attain happiness within a political organization because happiness represents living well without being concerned with others, they solely live for the trut...   [tags: Nicomachean Ethics Essays] 1147 words
(3.3 pages)
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Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics - In Book 1 of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, he argues that happiness is the best good, and the goal of an individual and of those leading and governing society. Here, happiness is understood as both living well and doing well, rather than the convention sense of happiness as an emotion. According to Aristotle, happiness is achieved though actions involving reason and in accord with virtue, or the best of the virtues of there are more than one. In this paper, I will provide a brief overview of the work and its author, then proceed to provide an overview of the ideas expressed and the argumentation supporting them, before finally performing an analysis and critique of the ideas expressed....   [tags: Literary Analysis ] 1144 words
(3.3 pages)
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Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics - 1. Money is both a necessary and useful instrument for justice in society because it establishes a proportional form of exchange, it acts as a medium to mediate exchange and enable supply and demand between people of different avocations thus promoting justice in society as well prompting injustice in society. 2. Money being necessary and a useful instrument for justice in society is relevant to the individual person because money allows and “guarantees” the individual to purchase and sell amongst dissimilar persons establishing a relationship through a universal mean of exchange....   [tags: money, distribution of wealth]
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1063 words
(3 pages)
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Aristotle Thesis Defense - Aristotle Thesis Defense Paper The topic I have chosen as the basis of my essay is that of how humans fit into the scale of nature according to Aristotle. To answer this question, we must first ask ourselves several other questions in order to better understand Aristotle’s thinking. First we must ask, “What is nature according to Aristotle?” then we must ask, “What is the scale of nature?” and finally, we answer the main question at hand and that is how humans fit into the scale of nature according to Aristotle....   [tags: nature, chain of being, spirit] 1195 words
(3.4 pages)
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Human and Human Nature: Aristotle and Sartre - It is only natural for humans to question why we have been put on this wonderful earth of ours. What does it mean to be these lucky ones called humans. Do we really have a human nature that is all our own. Are there really living beings that kind find something within this world to call our life purpose. And if there are, how do may we achieve it. It is happiness or simple the drive to survive that propel us forward. These are just some of the types of questions that philosophers have been wrestling with for centuries....   [tags: phylosophical analysis]
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2166 words
(6.2 pages)
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Aristotle's Four Causes - To know a thing, says Aristotle, one must know the thing’s causes. For Aristotle the knowledge of causes provides an explanation. It is a way to understand something. Because of the importance of causality to knowledge and understanding, Aristotle developed something like the complete doctrine of causality, distinguishing efficient, material, formal, and final causes, and later concepts of causality have been derived from his analysis by omission. Aristotle’s four causes gives answers to the questions related to the thing to help ascertain knowledge of it, such as what the thing is made of, where the thing comes from, what the thing actually is, and what the thing’s purpose is....   [tags: ancient Greek philosophy] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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Wit and Virtue: Addison Vs. Aristotle - The difference between Aristotle and Addison are based upon an important similarity: the love of virtue. Nevertheless, there is quite a difference between moral and intellectual virtue. Addison views the virtue of wit as the opposite of buffoonery, and though Aristotle would consider buffoonery a vice, he would not consider wit as an opposite but as a middle-ground. Addison describes wit in terms of truth and falsity which correspond to intellectual virtue. There is good reason to believe it to be an intellectual virtue, but on closer analysis, Aristotle turns out to be right in grouping it with the moral virtues....   [tags: Morality, Philosophy] 1161 words
(3.3 pages)
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Difference in the Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle and Their Influence. - ... He believed that to understand something completely, one needed to have direct experience with it through observing the natural world: One doesn’t need to venture to another world or realm to gain knowledge. Thus, Aristotle rejected Plato’s Theory of Forms (IEP). For Aristotle, the ‘forms’ Plato referred to existed within the imperfect things themselves, rather than existing in some other world. Aristotle’s Theory of Knowledge was grounded on his firm belief in logic and demanded empirical evidence....   [tags: Wisdom, Human Philosophy]
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1222 words
(3.5 pages)
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An Analysis of Batman Based on Aristotle's Virtue - The classic comic book character Batman, played by Christian Bale in the motion picture has an astonishingly complex character that is illustrated well with Aristotle’s perspective. Batman has two distinct characters, the one under the mask, Bruce Wayne and the one covered by the mask, Batman. Both have different sets of virtues that the other does not necessarily have. To explain these virtues, I will attempt to do an analysis of Batman based on Aristotle’s virtue. Then I will determine if he has a good life and whether others should mimic it....   [tags: ethics, philosophical analysis of comic book hero] 1468 words
(4.2 pages)
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Plato and Aristotle: Divergent Theories on Knowledge - Although Plato and Aristotle lived during the same time period, both philosophers developed two divergent theories of knowledge. In order to define knowledge, Plato utilizes his dialogue Theaetetus, specifically a conversation had between Socrates and Theaetetus about knowledge, the divided line diagram, and the Allegory of the Cave. In the dialogue Theaetetus, Plato introduces the three definitions of knowledge as proposed by Theaetetus. He, Theaetetus, states at the prodding of Socrates that knowledge is perception [Aistheta ] or as expressed by Protagoras that “ man is the measure of all things”....   [tags: Philosophy] 1062 words
(3 pages)
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Aristotle's Rhetoric and the Ethics of Modern Advertising - Aristotle's Rhetoric outlines the three main purposes of rhetoric as political, legal, and ceremonial. Persuasion is the main point of all three of the main venues for rhetoric. Rhetoric “may be defined as the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion” (Aristotle 22). Rhetoric can also be seen as a primer to explain the methods of persuasion used in modern-day commercials and advertisements. While the classic methods of effecting persuasion are pertinent to our understanding of how different forms of advertising work, there are also a host of modern day techniques that have changed the landscape of rhetoric....   [tags: Philosophy, Greek, Classics] 2387 words
(6.8 pages)
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Political Realm: A Comparsion of Aristotle and Pluto - Aristotle and Plato are known as the great political philosopher of their respective time.. The two illustrate some difference in thinking, but also share some similarity in their political ideas such as: supreme rules, political order, and virtue. Plato illustrating an idealist view while Aristotle brings more of a practical view to political philosophy. This paper would focus on the differences these political genius bring to the political realm. In Plato ideal world he looks to build upon a perfect political society....   [tags: supreme rule, political order, virtue] 1213 words
(3.5 pages)
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Aristotle Reading Commentary - The readings for the Aristotle were a little confusing. Hopefully I got it. He resembles good as being related to happiness. The final good is achievable in both complete and self-sufficient. He goes on to talk about the human action. He tells the readers that human beings and animals have completely different action because a human action (omit) is one that is done on purpose and for a definite goal although technically saying animals have these actions as well but they are missing the use of reason and intelligence....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 621 words
(1.8 pages)
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Aristotle’s Three Categories of Friendships - Friendships are special relationships that begin the development of social skills in each human person. Every time we open the door to form new friendships it begins with an experimental and holistic practice of philosophy and science. Whether we recognize the use of philosophy and science or not it’s being applied to shape friendships. The formation and bond of friendships has been studied for many years through science, philosophy, and theology. The point of this paper is to give the point of view and purpose of friendship according to science, philosophy, and theology and how it is applied to our everyday life....   [tags: Philosophy]
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2117 words
(6 pages)
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Human Nature: Aristotle vs Plato - Modern sciences have either directly emerged from philosophy or are very closely related to multiple philosophical questions. Understanding philosophy, as well as the way problems are addressed by philosophers, is the key to understanding science as we know it today and in the future. There are as many definitions of philosophy as there are philosophers – perhaps there are even more. Philosophy is said to be the mother of all disciplines. It is also the oldest of all disciplines and has given a rise to modern science, both social and natural conclusions....   [tags: Human Nature Essays]
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2002 words
(5.7 pages)
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Arguments of Plato in The Republic and Aristotle in Poetics - What does imitation (mimesis) involve for Plato and Aristotle. Explain its different features. Mimesis, the ‘imitative representation of the real world in art and literature’ , is a form that was particularly evident within the governance of art in Ancient Greece. Although its exact interpretation does vary, it is most commonly used to describe artistic creation as a whole. The value and need for mimesis has been argued by a number of scholars including Sigmund Freud, Philip Sydney and Adam Smith, but this essay will focus on the arguments outlined by Plato in The Republic and Aristotle in Poetics, attempting to demonstrate the different features of imitation (mimesis) and what it involves f...   [tags: imitation, mimesis]
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1188 words
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Aristotle, My Older Sister and Happiness - Happiness is a virtue seen different in everyone’s eyes. Happiness stands for what that person might desire, need or just what makes other happy. A single person cannot define happiness whit one word it’s a dynamic which is constantly changing depending on the individuals circumstances, believes, hobbies and so more, Therefore happiness exist whiting humans, it’s a way of living however not everyone has achieves happiness whiting at least not the happiness a Aristotle’s argues, a form of Happiness that consist of being the ultimate human being....   [tags: personal reflections and philosophy] 1286 words
(3.7 pages)
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Aristotle versus Confucius - Philosophy can best be described as an abstract, scholarly discourse. According to the Greek, philosophia refers to ‘love of knowledge’. This is an aspect that has involved a great number of clever minds in the world’s history. They have sought to deal with issues surrounding the character of veracity and significantly exploring the endeavors to respond to these issues. This paper seeks to compare and contrast the philosophy of Aristotle with that of Confucius. This is with a clear concentration on the absolute functions of these philosophies and how they take care of the particular responsibility of a person and the broader society and the resultant effects on societies (Barnes, 1995)....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Aristotle on Politics - Aristotle on Politics The central concern of theorists is to establish a form of constitution that a society will likely succeed. Political success according to Aristotle is determined by the happiness of the citizens of the society. Aristotle’s vision of a perfect government all begins with the character of the citizenry leading to the happiness of a whole state. Through his studies, Aristotle came to the conclusion that in order to achieve a perfect constitution it is essential to break down a society into parts and observe each individually....   [tags: Papers] 370 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Philosopher, Aristotle - The Philosopher, Aristotle The ancient Greek philosopher, Aristotle was an amazing individual who possessed a multitude of talents ranging from mastery of rhetoric to interest in physiology. Aristotle lived during the fourth century B.C. in ancient Greece. The culture of the Greeks during this time differs greatly from our present day life and times. Aristotle came into contact with many great men of history, from Plato his instructor and mentor to Alexander the Great, conquerer and ruler of the east....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1159 words
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Aristotle And Meteorology - Thesis: How accurate or inaccurate were Aristotle’s writings on meteorology. Introduction: Aristotle wrote about many subjects that can be grouped into five general divisions: logic, physical works, psychological works, natural history works, and philosophical works. One of the little known physical works concerned meteorology. Aristotle’s views on meteorology are fascinating, but many of the views were not accurate. This paper compares only a few of his views to actual meteorological facts. I....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Aristotle on Rhetoric - Aristotle on Rhetoric Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) was a Greek philosopher, educator, and scientist. He was able to combine the thoughts of Socrates and Plato to create his own ideas and definition of rhetoric. He wrote influential works such as Rhetoric and Organon, which presented these new ideas and theories on rhetoric. Much of what is Western thought today evolved from Aristotle's theories and experiments on rhetoric. Aristotle's Life Aristotle was born in 384 B.C., in Northern Greece. His father was a physician to the king of Macedonia, Amyntas II....   [tags: Papers] 1889 words
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Aristotle and Aquinas - Aristotle and Aquinas       Among political theorists, the debate over the rule of law has been quite intense.  From the earliest days of political philosophy through to the enlightenment, there have been varying views on what the rule of law should be.  Two thinkers in particular - Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas - are perhaps the most influential.  On the surface, they both advocate the rule of law as playing a crucial role in society.  But upon deeper analysis, one finds that Aristotle's views sharply contrast with those of Aquinas.  This essay shall attempt to elucidate the disagreement between Aristotle and Aquinas, by first outlining Aristotle's arguments for and against the rule o...   [tags: Philosophy essays]
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Aristotle on Friendship - Aristotle on Friendship We are social creatures. We surround ourselves with other human beings, our friends. It is in our nature. We are constantly trying to broaden the circumference of our circle of friends. Aristotle understood the importance of friendship, books VIII and IX of the Nicomachean Ethics deal solely with this topic. A modern day definition of a friend can be defined as “one joined to another in intimacy and mutual benevolence independently of sexual or family love”. (Oxford English Dictionary)....   [tags: Papers] 1142 words
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Biography of Aristotle - Aristotle was a Greek philosopher and scientist who lived from 384-322 B.C who was born in Stagira, Macedonia. His father played a major role in society as a physician in the royal court. Young Aristotle took a liking to Plato and decided to go to his academy at the age of seventeen. For the next twenty years, Aristotle remained there first as a student then as a teacher. After the death of Plato, Aristotle moved to Assos in the Asia Minor where he tutored his friend Hermias who was the ruler there and decided to marry his niece....   [tags: biography biographies ] 1494 words
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Plato and Aristotle - Plato describes a cave where people are chained up and can only see shadows cast on a wall. He parallels these shadows to the things that people see in the world around them, the materialistic reality that most people base their lives on. He parallels the chains to norms, customs, traditions, habits, etc. Plato believes that because people are so preoccupied with these shadows of the truth, they ignore the real truth. He parallels these shadows to the things that people see in the world around them, the materialistic reality that most people base their lives on....   [tags: essays research papers] 1903 words
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Aristotle On Tragedy - The Nature of Tragedy:In the century after Sophocles, the philosopher Aristotle analyzed tragedy. His definition: Tragedy then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play; in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions.Aristotle identified six basic elements: (1) plot; (2) character; (3) diction (the choice of style, imagery, etc.); (4) thought (the character's thoughts and the author's meaning); (5) spectacle (all the visual effects; Aristotle considered this to be t...   [tags: essays research papers] 1035 words
(3 pages)
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Aristotle On Ridicule - In book Four, Chapter Eight of the Ethics, Aristotle applies his philosophical ideals to the concept of humor and good company. He establishes categories and kinds of humor or wit, and sets limits for the behavior that a gentleman and a wise man will accept. At one point, however, he makes the admission that it’s hard to define when ridicule is appropriate. Because people react to ridicule in different ways, according to their temperament. This paper will examine the second paragraph of Book Four, Chapter Eight, to determine what it is about “ridicule” that causes Aristotle to break away from his usual method of analysis to consider other ways of looking at the problem....   [tags: essays research papers] 888 words
(2.5 pages)
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Physics by Aristotle - Physics by Aristotle Aristotle begins by describing the meaning of the words “nature” and “natural.” He identifies the meaning of each, and also explains some common phrases which include each of the words. He says all natural things have a principle of motion and of stationariness. He also says that natural things are composed of stone, earth, or a mixture of the two. According to him, artificial products do not possess the source of their own production. For example, the nature of a bed is of wood....   [tags: Papers] 549 words
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Aristotle on Nature - The Great Chain of Being Most of the concepts about the nature of living things in the early modern era were derived from the writings of Aristotle. Aristotle wrote about the concept of distinct types of organisms that could be distinguished from all the rest. Aristotle was interested in much more than the biological world, and attempted to build a theory of the world as a whole. As part of this theory, he believed that all of nature could be seen as a continuum of organization from lifeless matter....   [tags: essays research papers] 490 words
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Plato and Aristotle - Plato and Aristotle Plato and Aristotle have two distinct views on wellness. However, each man’s opinion on wellness is directly tied in to his respective opinions on the idea of imitation as a form of knowledge. Their appreciation or lack thereof for tragedy is in fact directly correlated to their own perspective on wellness and emotion. Firstly, it is important to consider each man’s view of wellness—that is how does each man go about addressing emotional stability. One important consideration is the approach Plato takes in relation to Aristotle....   [tags: Philosophy Essays Wellness]
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plato & aristotle - In these sessions, I have gained a better understanding of Aristotle and Plato’s ideas and theories. Particularly, I have a specific interest in Aristotle and the notion of the two extremes and to aim towards the “gray or middle of the road”. I also have an interest in Plato’s theory regarding the just and unjust and the repercussions of their actions. Aristotle is trying to achieve that single point in which life is the best of both worlds. He attempts to define an obtainable median point in life....   [tags: essays research papers] 878 words
(2.5 pages)
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Understanding Aristotle´s Nicomachean Ethics - ... To use words to coerce or convince, would destroy the very premise that virtue was built upon. Even if the reader didn't see the same ethical hole in the essay, if I was able to compose a piece of writing so masterful that the reader would take it as divine gospel, with this knowlege I would still be proving myself to be devoid of the very ethical virtue I claim to be exemplifying. This newfound knowlege that successfully answering the question would result in a virtuous reduncancy pushed me to the next part of the process....   [tags: knowledge, truth] 710 words
(2 pages)
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The Theory of Origin in Aristotle's Metaphysics - The Theory of Origin in Aristotle's Metaphysics In Aristotle’s Metaphysics, he discusses what he believes to be the theory of origin. One must differentiate Aristotle’s theory with that of creation. The word “creation” implies a biblical idea. Aristotle was not familiar with the biblical text and therefore did not understand the concept of “creation” in the biblical sense. Rather he was more interested in the “origin” of the world. Aristotle believes that before the concept of time there were three kinds of substances, two of them being physical and one being the unmovable....   [tags: Papers] 394 words
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Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics - Aristotle and the Book of Nicomanchean Ethics In Book I of Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle states that the ultimate human goal or end is happiness. Aristotle describes the steps required for humans to obtain happiness. Aristotle states that activity is an important requirement of happiness. He states that a happy person cannot be inactive. He then goes on to say that living a life of virtue is something pleasurable in itself. The virtuous person takes pleasure in doing virtuous things. The role of virtue is an important one for Aristotle....   [tags: Nicomanchean Ethics Philosophy Essays] 1511 words
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Aristotle Played a Crucial Role in the Formation of the Modern World - Aristotle Our world is very complicated and full of different miracles, phenomenas, enigmas. This unwittingly made people to think about nature, about their environment, about things surrounding them, about people around and relations with them, literally about everything. Humans’ minds are created in such way that understanding of the meaning of life, the nature of things, phenomenon of nature and life is quite necessary for existence and living. During the world history some people were pretty successful in understanding and analyzing our world, these are different philosophers, thinkers, scientists from the beginning of the world and up to now....   [tags: philosopher, plato's student, master science] 2106 words
(6 pages)
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Analysis of Aristotle's Views on Causality - Analysis of Aristotle's Views on Causality A: Aristotle's teaching on causality was in contrast to that of his teacher, Plato, Plato believed we can recognise an object because our soul remembers the perfect Form from the Realm of Forms, but Aristotle argues that we recognise an object because of the four causes that occasion it; the Material cause, the Efficient cause, the Formal cause and the Final cause. The Final cause is a very different cause to the other three. Whereas the Material, Efficient and Formal causes all relate to how something exists, the Final cause is about why it exists....   [tags: Papers] 347 words
(1 pages)
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Aristotle and the Doctrine of the Mean - Aristotle and the Doctrine of the Mean Aristotle seeks flourishing happiness in life. He believes that this can be achieved for each individual through the embracement of virtues. Aristotle believes that virtues are the mean of two vices. This is the basis of the Aristotelian “Doctrine of the Mean”. This paper will explore the basis of the Doctrine of the Mean, its connections to Eudaimonia, and its success or lack thereof. Eudaimonia is a Greek word whose meaning can be translated several ways....   [tags: Ethics Philosophy Essays]
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The Beliefs of Plato vs Aristotle - When Socrates was sixty years old, Plato, then a youth of twenty, came to him as a pupil. When Plato was sixty years old, the seventeen-year-old Aristotle presented himself, joining the Teacher's group of "Friends," as the members of the Academy called themselves. Aristotle was a youth of gentle birth and breeding, his father occupying the position of physician to King Philip of Macedon. Possessed of a strong character, a penetrating intellect, apparent sincerity, but great personal ambition. Aristotle was a student in the Academy during the twenty years he remained in Athens....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophers Essays] 3776 words
(10.8 pages)
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Emergence of Psychology Through Aristotle's Definition and Theories on the Psychê - It is without question that Aristotle's theories and principles influenced the western civilization for decades. According to Hergenhahn (2009) the philosopher's De Anima plays a major part of psychology because it is considered to be the first text on the history of psychology. It is within that book, Aristotle seek to define the mind and the soul: psychê. He later based his theories involving psychology based on his definition of psychê. In order to develop his own definition of the mind and the soul, Aristotle brought forth the idea of empirical studies of behavior as evidence upon his theories....   [tags: Psychology]
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Male Friendship as Viewed by Aristotle, Cicero, Montaigne, and Emerson - All four writers, Aristotle, Cicero, Montaigne, and Emerson discuss the importance of male friendship, and all four characters make statements about the superiority of friendship above other associations. However, the tone, the interpretation of friendship, and manner of rhetoric is influenced by the translation of the individual writer’s culture. Aristotle uses a rather categorical approach to friendship. By making strict delineations and then using examples, he establishes a rather strict definition of friendship that is created along lines of social class....   [tags: Philosophy] 1403 words
(4 pages)
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Aristotle’s View on the Necessity and Danger of Money - Aristotle’s view on the necessity and danger of money Intro Aristotle is widely regarded as the father of practical economic philosophy. His views on moral economic behavior, the economics of the house, the economics of trade, and his thoughts on markets can been read in Economics, Politics and The Politics and Economics of Aristotle. Within these readings we uncover Aristotle’s philosophic thoughts surrounding money. We learn that he considers money to be both dangerous and necessary in ancient Greece....   [tags: economy, trade, wealth] 770 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Writings of Sophocles and Aristotle - The Writings of Sophocles and Aristotle Writing, particularly story writing, is an art. When a person sets out to create a painting, there are certain rules of composition that need to be followed. In the art of writing, it is the same. There are rules of composition for writing and they must be followed by the writer. Some of these rules date back to Aristotle, who set down some rules for classical drama in his Poetics, a collection of class notes in which Aristotle attempted "to treat of Poetry in itself and of its various kinds" (1028)....   [tags: Papers] 581 words
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Perspectives on Happiness From Famous Philosophists - Essay Happiness is not easy to define. A good life has one characteristic – happiness. Happiness can be defined as pleasure, joy, contentment and satisfaction. Understandings of how to be happy were changing throughout the history. Aristotle who lived in 4th century BC in Athens and Schopenhauer who is19th century philosopher from Germany have contrasting understanding of happiness. In this essay I will argue that Aristotle and Schopenhauer provide accounts of happiness that are useful to contemporary society....   [tags: Aristotle, Schopenhauer]
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Happiness in Aristotle’s work: The Nicomachean Ethics - ... However, if this was true happiness would be a mental state and one would be happy while sleeping (1098b32-1099a3). Similarly, many associate honor and politics with happiness. Again Aristotle disputes this idea by stating that under this idea a person relies too heavily on others’ judgments rather than following his or her own beliefs. Essay The first book of Nichomachean Ethics involves Aristotle’s studies of mankind’s morality and the nature of human happiness. Aristotle goes on to define a virtuous life as one of happiness....   [tags: Ethics, Actions]
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