Your search returned over 400 essays for "Amendment"
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The Fisrt Amendment Analysis: Basic Freedom

- The interpretation of the first amendment has been seen throughout our history and, it had either been incorporated in a manner of conservancy or alteration. The first amendment basically describes what congress was under limited power to and, our basic freedoms. However, the concern was never questioned if the state government can curb those liberties since during the ratification of the bill there was little concern of this even being true. This had proven to be reality later on with the various cases that questioned not only the first, but several other amendments....   [tags: first amendment, amendments, freedom]

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The Fourth Amendment Of The Constitution

- The Fourth Amendment of the Constitution pertains to search and seizure and exists in order to protect citizens of the United States from unreasonable inquiries and detainment. The exact wording of the Fourth Amendment is as follows: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized (“Fourth Amendment”, 2014., p....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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The Codification of the Fourth Amendment

- The most difficult problem that arises for the courts because of technology is the codification of the Fourth Amendment to apply to technological change and progress. The vast changes technology brings to surveillance, security, and data collection offer a challenge to courts in classifying these new technologies and monitoring their use within the limits of the Fourth Amendment. The Fourth Amendment states that people have the right to be “secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.” An influential dissent written by Louis Brandeis contends that the amendment does not simply protect a person’s property but the “right to be let alone.”...   [tags: technologicals change, privacy, amendment]

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The Fourth Amendment And Law Enforcement

- Many people today have faced a time or two where their person, property, or homes have been search by law enforcement. Search and seizure is when law enforcement authorities or police officers suspect someone of criminal activity and performs a search. During the search the officer may take anything that can be used as evidence to present to the courts. It is a chance that some people’s rights and privacy have been violated during these searches and seizures. The United States Constitution Fourth Amendment has been put into place to protect the rights of citizens against unreasonable searches and seizure by law enforcement authorities....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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The First Amendment

- Introduction Since the first freedom of speech case was brought to the Supreme Court in 1919, the debate over whether it is an absolute or qualified right has persisted. As the Court attempts to capture the meaning of the First Amendment and its free speech clause, they create many tests and qualifications for the protection of the First Amendment. Many of the discussions revolving around free speech exceptions concern, at least in part, hateful and offensive speech. The paradox that plagues this argument is that speech cannot be qualified without encroaching on some rights, yet speech cannot be absolute without threatening the peace that rights are intended to protect....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The Fourth Amendment Passed By Congress

- The Fourth Amendment passed by congress in September 1789, and ratified again in December of 1791. It gave people the right to feel safe in their own houses, their castles. The Fourth Amendment gives people the right to be secure in their homes, their persons, that they cannot be subject to unreasonable searches and seizures. That no warrants shall be issued without any probable cause; and that in the warrant the places to be searched, or things to be seized must be clearly described and listed....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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History Of The 4th Amendment

- History of the 4th Amendment It is a common known fact that the Bill of Rights serve as a type of contract between the government and the people that outlines the specific rights that each individual is entailed and the government cannot revoke those rights. The Fourth Amendment protects those accused of a crime by preventing officials from searching the home, property, or body of the accused without a valid reason or a search warrant. Despite being a crucial amendment in terms of the privacy and personal protection of an individual, the history behind the conception of the amendment and the history of the amendment in the modern day is not known to a majority of the American population....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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The Fourth Amendment Protection Coverage

- Of the various places and things the Fourth Amendment protects, “the home is first among equals.” Florida v. Jardines, 133 S.Ct. 1409, 1414 (2013). For Fourth Amendment purposes, places and things protected includes the home and its curtilage, which is the area “immediately surrounding and associated with the home.” Id. Where there is no reasonable expectation of privacy, there is no Fourth Amendment protection coverage. See Katz v. United States, 88 S. Ct. 507 (1967). To determine whether a legitimate expectation of privacy exists, the court must determine whether an individual possessed 1) an actual (subjective) expectation of privacy in the place or thing searched; and 2) whether the expe...   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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The Second Amendment Exclusionary Rule

- The Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule has undergone a harsh and controversial development. This article not only critically analyzes the numerous alternatives and slight modifications to the exclusionary rule but the advanced by courts and commentators as well, (Schroeder, 1361). The article also puts emphasis on the alternative route of police policy making and a means to control official misconduct and violations of citizens rights. The exclusionary rule is one of the most significant defense stance of the fourth amendment....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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The Amendment Of Freedom Of Speech

- The 1st Amendment Freedom of speech is probably the most controversial amendment that there is within the Bill of Rights. “The first amendment of is freedom of religion, press, and expression, which states that congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances (Mount, S. 2010).” The first amendment gives the citizens of the U.S....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The Declaration Of The Fourth Amendment

- Abstract The United States Constitution contains basic rights, and some of those rights are the First Ten Amendments, that are known as Bill of Rights. In the Bill of Rights, the Fourth Amendment protects the people from unreasonable search, seizure and arrest. This paper will explore the history of the Fourth Amendment from the beginning until it was incorporated in the Bill of Rights, arrests, searches, exclusionary rule, warrant requirements, the fruit of the poisonous tree and what it is the USA Patriot Act....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The First Amendment Right Of Speech

- ARGUMENT I. THE LOWER COURTS CORRECTLY HELD THAT THE OFFICERS APPROPRIATELY RESTRICTED PETITIONER’S UNLAWFUL RECORDING BECASUE IT VIOLATED FIRST AMENDMENT REASONABLE TIME, PLACE, AND MANNER RESTRICTIONS. A. The First Amendment is not absolute; it is subject to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions Sergeant Cagney’s restriction on Petitioner’s recording was appropriate because the First Amendment does not allow an unrestricted right to gather any and all information. See Zemel v. Rusk, 381 U.S....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The First Amendment Right On Pornography

- The First Amendment right relates to pornography in that and obscenity in that pornography has not always been treated in a manner that would equate to free speech. The common argument for or against it is that it is or isn’t a work of art, and has had multiple interpretations and definitions set and revisions since 1973 by the supreme court. (CITATION) There have also been processes created by the supreme justices, most notably of Justice Burger, who in the case of Miller v. California served as chief justice, gave the majority opinion in that “[t]he basic guidelines for the trier of fact must be: (a) whether 'the average person, applying contemporary community standards ' would find that...   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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First Amendment Rights Of Schools

- First Amendment Rights in Schools Students’ rights in schools are limited or just taken away. Kids are forced to do whatever the officials at their school, either the principal or the teachers, tell the students to do. One of the main right that gets taken away or limited is students’ first amendment rights, which is the freedom of expression. Students can gets suspended by just doing things the staff at the school does not like, including saying things that they don 't like or supporting a religion that the school does not support....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The US Constitution: The Difficulty of Adding an Amendment

- The United States Constitution is considered to be more concise as well as much older than the constitutions of other nations worldwide. Although the United States Constitution is mature, there are such a limited number of amendments that have been added to the Constitution since it was created. Only twenty-seven amendments, including the Bill of Rights, have been added to the Constitution since its creation. This is not due to amendments not being suggested, because over eleven thousand amendments have been contemplated; however, this is because the process of adding an amendment to the Constitution is an extremely long and difficult process....   [tags: american history, amendment]

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The Fifth Amendment: Rights of Accused Suspects and Property Owners

- “I plead the Fifth.” This well-known expression is used by an individual who refuses to answer a question that may incriminate him. This phrase references the Fifth Amendment to the Bill of Rights (Brezina 15). The Bill of Rights protects the fundamental rights of Americans, including the rights of free speech, freedom of the press and freedom of religion (Teitelbaum 8). The Fifth Amendment in the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of a person accused of committing a crime (Teitelbaum 15)....   [tags: The Fifth Amendment]

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Current Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence

- Introduction The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was drafted by the Framers to protect the right to be free from governmental intrusion. Without a warrant and probable cause, an officer may not enter a home and search it. The use of GPS technology, however, enables the government to collect the same information without ever leaving the office. Thus, GPS based surveillance presents the issue of what protection the Fourth Amendment offers. Current Fourth Amendment jurisprudence offers little protection from warrantless surveillance....   [tags: Fourth Amendment, Rights, United States]

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The Fourth Amendment Of The United States Constitution

- One of the most important amendments in the United States Constitution and which is also part of the Bill of Rights is the Fourth amendment. The Fourth Amendment protects people from being searched or arrested by police officers or any law enforcement without a reason. An officer may confront you and ask to search your house but if they don’t have a search warrant, they cannot legally pursue it without good reason and permission from a judge. Now what happens when a person is being arrested. Does the police or any law enforcement need a search warrant....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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Benefits of the Second Amendment

- After a long, exhausting, painful war for independence from Great Britain, the United States became its own nation, a nation of choice and rights, a nation of voice and strong opinion, a nation with freedom handed to humans by God. The birth of this glorious new state brought forth a new era of revolution throughout the world. Countries took America’s victory to heart, overthrowing their monarchial governments and establishing governments run by popular sovereignty. The existence of the United States, perhaps, led to the global fight for self-government....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms]

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The First Amendment Rights Of The United States

- On July 4, 1776 The Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress. Eleven years later on September 17, 1787 the Constitution was signed. The Constitution was written to replace the Articles of Confederation because it did not grant enough power to the federal government. However, the Constitution limited the power of the federal government. The purpose of the Constitution is to protect but not grant the natural rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The First Amendment in the Constitution is very important because it protects freedom of speech, religion and the press....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The First Amendment Guarantees Freedom Of Speech

- Two ideas that were similar and that were shared by the sources are that the first amendment guarantees freedom of speech. Source #3 and source #4 explain how they would harm innocent people and would accomplish nothing positive. Source #3 proves that it is good for us to have freedom to say what we want but that there should also be limits to what we have the right to say. Source #3 states, “ The First Amendment to the United States Bill of Rights guarantees freedom of speech. But what if a person were to shout “Fire!” in a crowded movie theater when there was no fire at all ....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The Fourteenth Amendment Act Of The United States

- The fourteenth amendment protects anyone who lives in the United States for his or her own unalienable rights. Disregarding this amendment also disregards the first amendment, which, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” This case is significant due to the fact “Does the First Amendment bar a state from restricting the sale of violent video games to minors?” “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens o...   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The Importance of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

- The importance of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution is such that some have called it the amendment that “completed the Constitution.” When it was ratified on July 9th, 1868, the amendment became one of legislative cornerstones of the Reconstruction Era, a time in which the Radical Republicans, led by John A. Bingham and Thaddeus Stevens, promulgated a legislative program focused on providing racial equality before the law. Among the laws passed in the Reconstruction Era, the Fourteenth Amendment was one of the most controversial, with one Republican congressman, Representative A.J....   [tags: reconstruction era, 14th amendment]

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Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence : Schmerber V. California

- A decision that is still very influential to Fourth Amendment jurisprudence is Schmerber v. California. After Schmerber and a friend drank at a bowling alley, Schmerber got behind the wheel of his car, and crashed his car into a tree. Because of their injuries, Schmerber and his friend were both taken to a hospital for treatment. Once at the hospital, a police officer requested that Schmerber submit to a chemical test of his breath so that officers could test for the presence of alcohol in his body....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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Americans and Cubans Approaches to the Platt Amendment

- The U.S.’s relationship with Cuba has been arduous and stained with mutual suspicion and obstinateness, and the repeated U.S. interventions. The Platt agreement and Castro’s rise to power, served to introduce the years of difficulty to come, while, the embargo the U.S. placed on Cuba, enforced the harsh feelings. The two major events that caused the most problems were the Bays of Pigs and Cuban Missile Crisis. In 1903, the U.S. published the Platt Amendment, which was a set of guidelines for Cuba to follow (Blight 165)....   [tags: Americans, Cubans, Platt Amendment, Cuba, USA, ]

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The United States And The Amendment Of The Constitutional Authority Of Equal Protection

- Summary of Facts Joanne, who suffers from a debilitating medical condition, moved to Inebriation two months ago. Joanne’s new husband, Clarence, also has a debilitating medical condition, but he has resided in Inebriation for two years. Joanne and Clarence visit their Inebriation-based physician, Doctor, to obtain a medicinal marijuana permit. Despite Joanne’s qualifying medical condition, Doctor advises he cannot issue her a medicinal marijuana permit. Doctor, however, does issue a permit to Clarence....   [tags: Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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Article Analysis : ' A First Amendment Junkie ' By Susan Jacoby

- What is the First Amendment. According to the “Webster-dictionary” The First Amendment is “an amendment to the Constitution of the United States guaranteeing the right of free expression; includes freedom of assembly and freedom of the press and freedom of religion and freedom of speech.” Since the First Amendment was written by our founding fathers and is part of the constitution it should not be violated. This amendment secures the freedom of individuals to express their thoughts freely. In the essays “First Amendment Junkie” by Susan Jacoby and “Let’s Put Pornography back in the closet” by Susan Brownmiller both authors write about the First Amendment....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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Analysis Of The Article ' First Amendment Junkie ' By Susan Jacoby

- According to the Webster-dictionary The First Amendment is an amendment to the Constitution of the United States guaranteeing the right of free expression; includes freedom of assembly and freedom of the press and freedom of religion and freedom of speech. Since the first Amendment was written by our founding fathers and is part of our constitution it should never be violated. Being able to say and express what one thinks without been afraid of going to jail. In the essays “First Amendment Junkie” by Susan Jacoby and “Let’s Put Pornography back in the closet” by Susan Brownmiller both writes about the First Amendment is when one can express them....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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How The First Amendment Rights Have On Advancing Democracy

- Democracy is a form of government that limits the national government, while expanding the rights of the people. “Americans have long believed the limits of the power of government are an essential part of what makes America free” (Bardes, Shelley, 2014). In the Bill of Rights, the most famous of the first ten amendments was the First Amendment. The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the impact the First Amendment rights have had on advancing democracy in the United States. The First Amendment guarantees the freedom of religion, speech, press, assemble and petition to the national government....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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Atheism Should Be Covered Under The First Amendment

- 1. Yes, atheism should be covered under the first amendment because everyone is allowed to believe in what they want to be believed and have their own opinions. Each person has different beliefs, which sets us apart from one another and makes everyone unique. If they did not allow religions that didn’t involve a god such as Christianity or Islam, then they would choosing religions over one another, which is against the first amendment (Cripe, Pearlman, Kosiak, 2013). Everyone is protected by the first amendment and everyone’s religion is protected as well, no matter the controversy over the religion....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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Argument Of School Uniforms Are Not A Violation Of Their First Amendment

- Position Memo Proponents of school uniforms agree that students’ school uniforms are not a violation of their First Amendment of the U.S. constitution right. In the case of Canady v. Bossier Parish School Board, the Fifth Circuit upheld that “students remain free to wear what they want after school hours. Students may still express their views through other mediums during the school day” (Canady v. Bossier Parish School Board). Advocates for school uniforms argue that school is for learning, and that self-expression is for after-school hours....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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Does The First Amendment Protect False Campaign Speech?

- DOES THE FIRST AMENDMENT PROTECT FALSE CAMPAIGN SPEECH. AN ANALYSIS OF SUSAN B. ANTHONY LIST V. DRIEHAUS AND FREE SPEECH INTRODUCTION The 2016 Presidential election season has come with no shortage of defamation news. Republican nominee Donald Trump famously said that if he won, he would “open up those libel laws,” so that “when they write purposely negative and horrible and false article, we can sue them and win lots of money.” On the opposite side of the same coin, Republican operative Cheri Jacobus filed a defamation suit against Trump for allegedly publishing false statements intended to damage her reputation....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

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The Eighth Amendment

- The 8th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States prohibits cruel and unusual punishment, as well as the setting of excessive bail or the imposition of excessive fines. However, it has also been deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States (according to the Eighth Amendment)to inflict physical damage on students in a school environment for the purpose of discipline in most circumstances. The 8th Amendment stipulates that bail shall not be excessive. This is unclear as to whether or not there is a constitutional right to bail, or only prohibits excessive bail, if it is to be granted....   [tags: Eighth Amendment Essays]

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The Failed Ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment in the U.S.

- The ERA was introduced in every Congress since 1923, and yet it still failed to gain ratification. The ERA was the Equal Rights Amendment, which means that equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. I believe it was never passed because of many reasons. One reason was because some ERA supports got offended by other supports who were very obnoxious, which was a backlash on feminist tactics. (Doc. E & F) Another is that men and women might switch places, and it would be a threat to traditional roles.(Doc....   [tags: Equal Rights Amendment, USA, feminism, ]

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Will We Follow Lincoln's Advice? The Fourth Amendment

- “Don't interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties.” Abraham Lincoln made this statement in referring to the emancipation of the slaves. Even though the statement has nothing to deal with the Fourth Amendment, or the Search and Seizure laws within the Constitution, what is stated still brings about a good point relating to the Constitution. The fact being brought out of this quote is that the Constitution’s purpose is to safeguard Americans’ liberties....   [tags: Fourth Amendment, Abraham Lincoln, presidents, con]

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Fifth Amendment and Double Jeopardy

- Fifth Amendment and Double Jeopardy Double jeopardy is the prosecution of a person for an offense for which he or she has already been prosecuted. The double jeopardy clause, which is in the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution, was designed to protect an individual from being subject to trials and possible convictions more then once for an alleged offense. The idea was not to give the State too much over the individual, this way no individual will be subject to embarrassment, expense, and ordeal against being tried for an alleged offense more then once....   [tags: Law Legal 5th Amendment]

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The Amendment Of Same Sex Couples From Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky, And Tennessee

- Obergerfell V Hodges: Groups of same sex couples from Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky, and Tennessee all had cases in their own states, but when brought to the supreme court, they all combined as one. These couples challenge the states refusal to recognize legal marriage documents. It is said that the states statutes violate the equal protection clause as well as the due process clause of the fourteenth amendment, additionally, the civil rights act. The U.S court of appeals reversed and held that the states ban on same sex marriage and refusal to recognize marriages obtained in other states is not constitutional....   [tags: Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution]

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The Controversy of the Second Amendment of the Constitution

- I. INTRODUCTION: The Second Amendment to the Constitution(Second Amendment) of the United States of America(USA) is one of the most controversial. The Second Amendment specifically grants that, "the right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed" The way that an individual interprets the wording of the Second Amendment influences their point of view on who has the right to "keep and bear arms" (Amendment 2). The controversy brought on by the Second Amendment is because the Second Amendment does not clearly define whom "the people" are....   [tags: Bear Arms Second Amendment USA]

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The Second Amendment of the Constitution

- The Second Amendment “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” This timeless phrase, the Second Amendment of the United States’ Constitution, is an enduring example of the principles and ideals that our country was founded on. With this statement, the founders of this country explicitly and perpetually guaranteed the American individual the right to keep and bear arms. An incomparably crucial element of this country‘s origins, the Second Amendment and the rights it guarantees have proved vital to the growth and success of our nation....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms]

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First Amendment Rights, Privacy and the Paparazzi

- First Amendment Rights, Privacy and the Paparazzi The question of paparazzi threatening privacy and First Amendment rights is often to situational to argue in a conventional manner, but certainly there are many facets of the issue which can be addressed in a quite straightforward manner. Celebrities who feel they have the right to privacy in public places often muddy the waters of this issue. Oddly enough, those celebrities who have chosen to speak out against what they feel are violations of their privacy most always begin their campaigns with a large press conference....   [tags: First Amendment Right to Privacy]

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The Fourteenth Amendment and Equality Under the Law

- The Fourteenth Amendment and Equality Under the Law The Fourteenth Amendment was adopted in 1868 as one of the longest amendments to the Constitution with five parts in total. The most significant part is section one. In the very first sentence of section one, . All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, as citizens of the United States and of the state where in they reside. citizenship was universalized. The Amendment was designed to prohibit state governments from curtailing the rights of former slaves after the Civil War, however it has been used to grant all of the personal liberties and rights conveyed in the Bill of Rights....   [tags: Papers 14th Amendment History Essays ]

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Amendments to the Constitution

- The framers of our Constitution knew that time has a way of changing countries and their citizens. Our country was in a whirlwind of change in 1789 as people were experiencing freedom from the tyranny of England for the first time in their lives. Our country was being molded and formed into a great nation by the founding fathers. Expectations and rules had to be set to protect the rights of the minorities and majorities. Amendments to the Constitution were written to ensure equality for all in changing times....   [tags: First Amendment, Second Amendment]

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The Second Amendment And The Fourteenth Amendment

- The 15th Amendment was an amendment added to the United States Constitution in 1870 that gave citizens the right to vote no matter their race, skin color, or previous conditions of servitude. This specifically applied to African American males who, though technically were citizens under the 14th amendment, were still being oppressed and restricted from voting. According to Angela Davis in her text, while some feminist activists in the 19th century supported this amendment, others were adamantly opposed to it....   [tags: African American, Black people, American Civil War]

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The Amendment Of The Fourteenth Amendment

- Keep the 22nd Amendment I agree with the statement, “The 22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, limiting the American president to elected terms in office, has been successful and should be retained. This amendment has facilitated rotation in office and new ideas, both crucial to an effective democracy.”. The statement is an agreeable because it does not deprive citizens of their right to elect, it opens the candidate pool, problems have not arisen, and stops the country from being a monarchy....   [tags: President of the United States]

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The Fourth Amendment And The Fifth Amendment

- right is violated in any way it is most likely the violator would face criminal charges or consequences due to their actions for denying citizens their Fourth Amendment right. Fifth Amendment Our Fifth Amendment discusses due process, self-incrimination, double jeopardy and eminent domain. Consider this Amendment as a safeguard stating no person shall be under pressure to answer for any crime, unless he or she is under the indictment of a grand jury (Abadinsky, 2008). The only exception to the Fifth Amendment would be the cases involving any military or militia presently servicing or during war times....   [tags: United States Constitution, Law, Crime]

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The Amendment Of The Fourteenth Amendment

-                The 15th Amendment was an law added to the United States Constitution in 1870 that gave citizens the right to vote no matter their race, skin color, or previous conditions of servitude. This specifically applied to African American males who, though technically were citizens under the 14th amendment, were still being oppressed and restricted from voting. According to Angela Davis in her text, while some feminist activists in the 19th century supported this amendment, others were adamantly opposed to it....   [tags: Black people, African American, American Civil War]

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The Eighth Amendment And The Fifth Amendment

- Introduction The eighth amendment is important for many of the people in the United States. The eighth amendment of the U.S. constitution states,” Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.” In this paper, the only part that will be looked at is the cruel and unusual portion of the eighth amendment. This portion is the most important to the incarcerated within the federal and state prison systems. The eighth amendment deals with a few things with the various prison systems....   [tags: Prison, Capital punishment]

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The Second Amendment : The Amendment

- The Second Amendment The Bill of Rights contains the first ten amendments we reserve as citizens of the United States. Within the Bill of Rights there are things such as freedom of speech, press, religion, and protection from excessive bail. The second amendment gives us the right to own and carry guns, it states, “…the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” Our Founding Fathers made sure that our individual freedoms were secure, and our country was to always be democratic in the decisions made....   [tags: Firearm, Gun politics in the United States]

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The Amendment Of The Fourteenth Amendment

- The 14th amendment speaks formally to many aspects which deal with the citizenship and also the citizen rights. The 14th amendment consist of different section which under up to five. It also consist of important concepts which deals with the action of the state which is most famously, the immunities and the privileges, the protection which is equal and the due process, all this are contained in the first section. The section two involves the apportionment which are used to representatives for the congress2....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Amendment Of The Second Amendment

- Recently in the city of Jesse James, Texas there was yet another mass shooting incident. Several parishioners at a local baptist church were attacked. At least a dozen individuals were killed and at least that many wounded. After the fact, the city council has decided to pass legislation making several, restrictive changes on firearms and their ownership. This action raises questions regarding the constitutionality of this action. The 2nd Amendment With everything on the news today most of us can probably cite the provisions of the second amendment....   [tags: Gun politics in the United States, Firearm]

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The Amendment And The Second Amendment

- When our nation was young the founders came together to draft a new Constitution and form a republican government. Many had come to realize that the Articles of Confederation were flawed and the founders sought to find a solution. The new Constitution was accepted by the people on the premises that a bill of rights would be put in place to insure the natural rights of the people and of the states. One of these rights is explained in the Second Amendment to the Constitution as the right to a militia and the right of the people to keep and bear arms....   [tags: United States Declaration of Independence]

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The Amendment And The Second Amendment

- When our nation was young, the founders came together to draft a new Constitution and form a republican government. Many had come to realize that the Articles of Confederation were flawed and the founders sought to find a solution. The new Constitution was accepted by the people on the premise that a bill of rights would be put in place to insure the natural rights of the people and of the states. One of these rights is explained in the Second Amendment of the Constitution as the right to a militia and the right of the people to keep and bear arms....   [tags: Human rights]

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The First Amendment of the United States Constitution

- The United States Constitution was signed on September 17th, 1787. It did not include a bill of rights and it did not include their freedoms. And so, on September 25, 1789 Congress passed the first ten amendments, which were later ratified on December 15, 1791. The Bill of Rights was created by the Founding Fathers with the intent of restricting the powers of the new national government. The Bill of Rights, however, consists of 10 amendments. The first of the amendments was written because the people at America’s establishment wanted their basic freedoms guaranteed....   [tags: amendments, bill of rights, citizen freedom]

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Gun Control: Should the Second Amendment of the Constitution be Updated?

- According to the F.B.I., 14,369 murders involving firearms took place in the year 2013 within the United States. We as Americans have the right to “bear arms,” however there can be some changes to at least try to minimize these casualties. The 2nd Amendment states “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” This may be outdated now that we have a strong military (that is our “well regulated Militia,”) to protect our security, but can a right be scratched off the Constitution because of someone’s interpretation....   [tags: Second Amendment The Right To Bear Arms]

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United States Constitution: Amendment Process

- The United States constitution has an amendment process that has been included in the Bill of Rights. The amendment allows Americans to make changes on the September 17, 1789 United States Constitution was ratified and made law. The amendment of the Bill of rights has made America to continue growing in prosperity through the years and to become one of the most powerful nations in the world. The United States constitution was created with an amendment in Article V. This amendment process allows the constitution to adapt to the changes in the American society....   [tags: bill of rights, bear firearms, amendments]

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The Importance of the First Amendment of the United States’ Bill of Rights for Democratic Government and its Citizens

- Being expression one of the most important rights of the people to maintain a connected society right to speech should be accepted to do so. The first amendment is one of the most fundamental rights that individuals have. It is fundamental to the existence of democracy and the respect of human dignity. This amendment describes the principal rights of the citizens of the United States. If the citizens were unable to criticize the government, it would be impossible to regulate order. By looking freedom of speech there is also freedom of assembly and freedom of press that are crucial for the United States democracy. According to the “Derechos, Human Rights”, freedom of speech is one of the most...   [tags: First Amendment, USA, Bill of Rights, Democracy, G]

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Persuasive Essay: Gun Control Contradicts the Second Amendment

- Gun control has been a hot topic for very long time. People on the anti- gun control side believe that gun ownership is a Constitutional right backed by the Second Amendment. The anti-gun believe that you should be able to posses and own any firearm. They also believe that gun laws only restrict the law abiding citizens. Pro-gun control believe that guns are the backbone to our crime problem. They also believe that gun laws help keep guns of the street and deter crime. The Second Amendment reads," A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed" (Caplan p32)....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms]

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The Second Amendment: Americans Have the Right to Bear Arms!

- The United States Constitution says that U.S. Citizens have the right to bear arms. Even though this guarantee was written with no constraints, there are now laws that limit certain aspects of gun ownership. The reasons for gun control fall under the flag of public safety. Though there are many safety reasons why private ownership of firearms should be banned, these arguments are outweighed not only by the need for protection, but because the limitation of ownership rights could become dangerous to personal freedom....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms]

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Amendments that Make U.S. Citizens Equal

- Wouldn’t it be wrong if the women in the United States could not vote. Aren’t elections about coming together as equal United States citizens to vote for a candidate. The 19th amendment of the US Constitution states, “All US female citizens have the right to vote”. Men and women were not treated as equal Americans. The 19th amendment gave women the same rights as men. The 15th amendment of the US Constitution states, “ The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” Freedom and equal right amendments are important because they represent what America stands f...   [tags: 15th amendment, freedom, 19th amendment]

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A Living Amendment: The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution

- A Living Amendment The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution is the most essential Amendment of all for employees working in the criminal justice field. This Amendment sets the foundation for the criminal justice system and implements mandatory guidelines for governmental employees. When the Constitution was originally created, its sole intent was to place limitations and restrictions on the federal government. The Constitution, as a living document has changed over the years and has continually been interpreted to keep up with America’s ever growing diversity and use of technology....   [tags: foundation for the criminal justice system]

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The Treaty Of The Amendment

- After an amendment has been adopted under section 214, or 216, articles of amendment in the prescribed form shall be delivered to the Registrar. If an amendment effects or requires a reduction of stated capital, section 48(3) and (4) shall apply. Upon receipt of articles of amendment from a company, the Registrar shall issue to the company a certificate of amendment in accordance with section 481. An amendment to the articles of a company become effective on the date shown in the certificate issued by the Registrar in respect of that company; and the articles of the company is amended accordingly....   [tags: Corporation, Limited liability company]

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The Amendment Of The Constitution

- The Second Amendment to the Constitution provides Americans the right to bear arms. Certain groups are avidly trying to amend this right that was fought for by our fore fathers. Many sources have given ample evidence to support the fact that gun control will not stop crime or killings. As the Founding Fathers of America were deciding which type of government would work best in the new land, many people grew frightened at the thought of having no form of defense from a possible army controlled by a centralized government....   [tags: Firearm, Gun politics in the United States]

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Argumentative Essay: Gun Control Violates The Second Amendment of the Constitution

- The U.S. should not have gun control laws. The Second Amendment to the Constitution states that, “A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” This amendment has been around since 1791, and there has been gun control almost as long as it's been around. The National Rifle Association is an advocate of the Second Amendment and an opponent of those who propose restrictions on guns. Even Presidents Reagan and Bush are members, and Nixon, Eisenhower, and Kennedy were also members....   [tags: Second Amendment The Right To Bear Arms]

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Argumentative Essay: Gun Control Violates The Second Amendment of the Constitution

- Civilian ownership of firearms has for more than two hundred years been the very cornerstone upon which the liberty of the public has been supported. The very reason that Americans have never suffered a tyranny on the scale of Nazi-Germany has been due to the proliferation of firearms in the hands of the general public. The Second Amendment to the Bill of rights of the United States Constitution states "A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed." In order to understand that right, the modern reader must understand the semantics of the eighteenth century....   [tags: Second Amendment The Right To Bear Arms]

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The First Amendment

- The First Amendment is the first section of the Bill of Rights and is often considered the most important part of the U.S Constitution because it guarantees the citizens of United States the essential personal freedoms of religion, speech, press, peaceful assembly and the freedom to petition the Government. Thanks to the rights granted by the First Amendment, Americans are able to live in a country where they can freely express themselves, speak their mind, pray without interference, protest in peace and where their opinions are taken into consideration, which is something not many other nationalities have the fortune of saying....   [tags: bill of rights, constitution, Madison]

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The Seventeenth Amendment

- Written in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, and later ratified by the thirteen original states in 1788, the Constitution establishes the relationship between the federal (national) government and state governments. It establishes our republican form of government with an elected Executive (President), a bicameral congress (consisting of two legislative branches, a House of Representatives and a Senate), and a judicial system headed by a Supreme Court. The Framers' of the Constitution were influenced in their work by the ancient Athenians, the thinkers of the Enlightenment; Locke and Montesquieu....   [tags: U.S. Law, government, constitution]

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The Fourteenth Amendment

- The extents of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution has been long discussed since its adoption in mid-late 1800s. Deciding cases like Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade has been possible due to mentioned amendment. These past cases not only show the progression of American society, but also highlights the degree of versatility that is contained within the amendment. Now, in 2015, the concerns are not of racial segregation or abortion, the extent of the amendment was brought to a new field: same-sex marriage....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Second Amendment

- “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.” This quote from Benjamin Franklin illustrates how an emphasis on safety can drastically reduce the freedoms enjoyed by citizens of the United States, especially the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution which states that “...the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” However, with active shooter situations such as Columbine; the Tucson, Arizona shootings, which nearly killed former Representative Gabrielle Giffords; and recent situations at Newtown, Connecticut; Los Angeles International Airport; and Westfield Garden State Plaza mall in New Jersey...   [tags: Constitution, US, gun control, federal government]

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The First Amendment

- America has been built on freedom throughout the years. Freedom to speak, freedom to choose, freedom to worship, and freedom to do just about anything you want within that of the law. America’s law has been designed to protect and preserve these freedoms. The First Amendment guarantees freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. It assures citizens that the federal government shall not restrict freedom of worship. It specifically prohibits Congress from establishing an official, government supported church....   [tags: The Bill of Rights]

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The Second Amendment

- “A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” - Second Amendment. Throughout history, this sentence of twenty seven words has caused an intense debate. The polemic is that some people claim that a gun control policy is unconstitutional, while others disagree and even say it is necessary in order to reduce crime. Now, what does gun control mean. If it means to analyze who is responsible enough to own a gun by a “Universal Background Check”; that sounds right to everyone....   [tags: Gun Control, Check and Balance]

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The Prohibition Amendment

- The Prohibition Amendment, which took effect on January 16, 1920, outlawed the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcohol in the United States and its territories, until its repeal on December 5, 1933. Today, Prohibition is often referred to as the “Noble Experiment” because it was created to reduce the adverse effects that alcohol had on families and society. Excessive consumption of alcohol, primarily by men, often resulted in domestic violence, poor work performance, and wasteful spending of wages on alcohol, which were needed to support families....   [tags: alcohol prohibition, crime]

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The Constitution : Suppression Of The 2nd Amendment

- The Constitution: Suppression of the 2nd Amendment “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not infringed.” Many people will recognize this as the 2nd amendment to the United States Constitution. What the people may not know is that it is under attack. Those that oppose the right of the citizens to own firearms are trying to eradicate the 2nd amendment because it guarantees that right to the American people....   [tags: United States Constitution, U.S. state, Firearm]

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4th Amendment

- 4th Amendment In the late 1700's the 4th Amendment was written because of strong objections to the Writs of Assistance or general warrants. The Writs Assistance gave officials the right to enter any home and seize belongings without a reasonable cause. (Grolier Encyclopedia) The 4th amendment was ratified in the Bill of Rights on December 15, 1771. This amendment protects the people's right to privacy and security. (Encarta Online) The Fourth Amendment states, 'The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affi...   [tags: Government Constitution Amendments History Essays]

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The Fourteenth Amendment Of The United States

- The Thirteenth Amendment of the Constitution of the United States was the first amendment added to the Constitution immediately after the Civil War. The Thirteenth Amendment officially outlawed slavery. The Thirteenth Amendment was adopted December 18, 1865 which says, “Section 1: Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2: Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” This amendment is the most important amendment of the Reconstruction Amendments....   [tags: United States Constitution, American Civil War]

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The Amendment Of The United States

- An amendment is a minor change in a document. To the community is the rights of each person and the limitation they have been set to follow. The amendments are so the people know what is expected from them to be done. The people are not the only ones that have limitation but the congress and government have limitation in their freedom as well. If we did not have rights everyone will be all over the place. While an amendment set limitation but see the freedom as well. It’s like a contract where equality and the peace in people are found....   [tags: United States Constitution, United States]

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The Fourteenth Amendment And The Bill Of Rights

- According to the Tenth Amendment in the Bill of Rights: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” Though last in the Bill of Rights, it is one of the most powerful and ever changing in interpretation over the course of America’s history. Some historical events that altered its meaning include the Civil War, The Civil Right’s Movement, and even modern event’s like the Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage....   [tags: United States Constitution, American Civil War]

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The Second Amendment Is Constitutional Or Unconstitutional

- The Second Amendment has always been met with much debate on whether gun control is constitutional or unconstitutional. The framers of the Second Amendment have left many people with different opinions on what its true intent was. Charles L. Blek Jr. and Joseph Sorban have two different views with many over lapping ideas and use court rulings, Second Amendment history, and past events in their articles to help support their positions. Sobran believes that any legislation on gun control is a direct violation of the people’s constitutional rights and that everyone should be allowed to bear arms....   [tags: United States Constitution]

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The Amendment And The Bill Of Rights

- On December 15, 1791 the Bill of Rights was ratified to limit the government 's power, but no one could have predicted how the world would change and how the amendments would be tested. Since the Bill of Rights was written the world has changed drastically. With advances in technology, that the founders of the constitution could have never predicted, many of the amendments are not applied in the same ways as they were when they were written. The Fourth Amendment in particular has changed very much....   [tags: United States Constitution, Law]

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The First Amendment in Public Schools

- The First Amendment was added to the Constitution in 1789 in order to secure individual rights to freedom of religion, speech, and the press in America. The First Amendment states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances” (Resources). Various government officials and supporters of constitutional rights of individuals have staunchly defended students’ First Amendment rights on public school property....   [tags: american politics, the constitution]

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The Fundamental Purpose Of The First Amendment

- The fundamental purpose of the first amendment was to guarantee the maintenance of an effective system of free speech and expression. This calls for an examination of the various elements which are necessary to support such a system in a modem democratic society. Some of these elements found early articulation in the classic theory of free expression, as it developed over the course of centuries; others are the outgrowth of contemporary conditions. More specifically, it is necessary to analyze what it is that the first amendment attempts to maintain: the function of freedom of expression in a democratic society; what the practical difficulties are in maintaining such a system: the dynamic fo...   [tags: United States Constitution]

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