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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World introduces us to a futuristic technological world where monogamy is shunned, science is used in order to maintain stability, and society is divided by 5 castes consisting of alphas(highest), betas, gammas, deltas, and epsilons(lowest). In the Brave New World, the author demonstrates how society mandates people’s beliefs using many characters throughout the novel. John, a savage, has never been able to fit in society. Moving through two contradicting societies, John is unable to adapt to the major differences of the civilized society due to the different ways upon how it is conducted....   [tags: Aldous Huxley, Brave New World]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... Aldous is setting the reader up to demonstrate how these values should be rejected in daily life. Overall, the hypnoaedic teaching of “Everyone belongs to everyone else” creates a structure of how society functions and prepares Huxley’s main evaluation of Brave New World’s value on identity. After the introduction to how society learns values, Bernard and Lenina travel to a reservation. Within the reservation, the idea of identity is brought up as Lenina notices a woman breast feeding a child....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, Huxley family]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... This makes population feel more attached to physical possession than to actual people or nature. Love for nature improves our expectations of life, when we learn how to enjoy nature people learn to cherish every moment they experience whether is good or bad. It also develops a stronger bond between humans and the hearth we live in. It opens our mind to ask questions like, why. how. where?. When our intellectual is able to go beyond social limitations we realize there is more to life than what we are offered....   [tags: Aldous Huxley, Brave New World, Huxley family]

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Analysis of Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

- As the story begins, Savage is attempting to free the Deltas by freeing them of their drug addiction. To Savage freedom includes the ability to make rational decisions but the Deltas have no ability to rationalize due to their genetic make-up. As Savage is throwing a way the drugs one of his friends, an Alpha who is capable of reason, approaches him but is stopped by reason. Reason prevents him from helping his friend due to indecision and the inability to calculate the action that will create the best outcome....   [tags: aldous huxley]

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`` Brave New World `` By Aldous Huxley

- ... These two end up going back with Bernard and Lenina, welcomed by scientists longing to study them. After arriving back to normal society, the character focus changes and is directed towards the other main character, John, nicknamed John the Savage by the cruel society. The people who live in the modern civilization are trained to think the same and act the same, never worrying or stressing about too much. Their idea of a perfect society includes, “community, identity, [and] stability,” (Huxley 3) John has a hard time adjusting to this society, and after his mother, Linda, dies, he questions the actions the people around him take....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, Dystopia]

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The Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... In the Brave New World, people see soma holidays as happiness and bliss, but at the same time, no individual has ever had the chance to experience happiness without soma because even from a very young age, soma was always present. However, in society today, too many different aspects measure happiness. There is no telling if drugs do truly bring people happiness. The sad truth, seen in both societies, is that once one is addicted to taking drugs, they are always going to be reliant on the drugs....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, Human sexuality]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... Lastly, science has provided the World State with a method to tell each citizen what to like. At the beginning of Brave New World, we are introduced to a Bokanovsky group of Deltas who are going to be conditioned to dislike flowers and books. The nurses on duty utilize a shrieking siren and electric shocks to scare the babies away from these things. Also, science has provided hypnopædia, the process by which ideas can be implanted in the brain during sleep, which can "bring home…more complex courses of behavior" by utilizing "words without reason" (Huxley 28)....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... One of the other characters that John the Savage contrasts is Lenina, as they share a common attraction, but opposing ideas of love. John shows a relatively immature sense of sexuality, relying on Shakespeare in his stance on sex, “If thou cost break her virgin knot before all sanctimonious ceremonies may with full and holy rite.” (Huxley, 128) In opposition, Lenina shows an immature sense of love, attempting to have sex with him at every opportunity. Lastly, he contrasts Bernard, who begins to indulge in the lifestyle of pleasure in which the average World State citizen lives, while John attempts to overthrow this same lifestyle....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... F. stands for After Ford. The starting date for the calendar of the World State is the day Henry Ford introduced the Model T, October 1, 1908. Stability describes the setting, restrained by technology and the world controllers. Baker comments the plot of Brave New World, “generically constrained by the fundamental thematic opposition of freedom and restraint” (45). Technology places an abundance of power in the hands of the leaders. Therefore, the leaders command the people of the World State through technology....   [tags: Brave New World, The World State, Aldous Huxley]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- It seems the goal of most individuals in life is to find purpose, overcome obstacles, and be as happy as possible each and every day. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley introduces a new theory on happiness: that happiness cannot exist while human minds are subjected to the truth. Similar to the phrase ignorance is bliss, the main theme throughout the novel is that happiness and truth cannot coexist properly in a society. While happiness is the ultimate goal of the utopian society depicted in Brave New World, it does not come without a price: denial of realities, and the freedom to make individual choices....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, Island, Dystopia]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... People of the World State were conditioned to consume soma regularly. Mustapha Mond, one of the controllers of the World State stated, “And if ever, by some unlucky chance, anything unpleasant should somehow happen, why, there’s always soma to give you a holiday from the facts. And there’s always soma to calm your anger, to reconcile you to your enemies, to make you patient and long-suffering.”(CH 17, page 237-238). From this statement, Mustapha Mond asserted that applying soma gave the citizens of the World State calmness and happiness....   [tags: Brave New World, The World State, Aldous Huxley]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... And if anything should go wrong, there’s soma.....’ (Huxley 220). Mustapha Mond proves that the citizens are indeed happy, despite the fact that they are not individuals, but only because of their conditioning. The citizens of the World State do not have goals to change or better their life because they accept where they are. They have given up their autonomy in order to remain happy. Another sacrifice for happiness, in this society, is literature. In Huxley’s novel, citizens are still happy because their free thinking is limited through the control of their literature....   [tags: Brave New World, Island, Aldous Huxley]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... Mond say that sacrificing art, science, and religion were required while John disagrees and asserts that life is not worth living. Mond states John and Helmholtz are to be exiled, where Bernard reacts wildly and is forcibly removed from the room. Helmholtz takes the opportunity of exile as a way to study and gain intelligence. John refuses to go to the island with his friends and goes to the countryside to purify himself by self-flagellation. People notice, and many people gather to see the sight; Lenina being one of them....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... People must be made to “like their unescapable social destiny”, officials insist. Brave New World, the antihero known as “the Savage” rebels against the happiness agenda, telling his smiley-faced rulers: “I want freedom, I want goodness, I want sin… I’m claiming the right to be unhappy.” I believe that we should claim the same right against prying in our emotional lives today. The people of Brave New World are kept calm with a drug called soma. Described as having “all of the advantages of Christianity and alcohol and none of their defects”, it’s a psychoactive drug that induces feelings of calm, therefore contradicting any need to discover and potentially tackle the true source of on...   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... Linda, however, managed to adapt to the situation and learned to cope with a combination of alcohol called mescal and a hallucinogenic called peyotl. Linda must take this path towards a replacement because she had been taught to take soma when she isn’t feeling completely content with her emotions. Even when they return back into the World State, they start taking copious amounts of soma because they have become so anxious without it. Linda even maintains her soma holiday up until her death....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... Also the fact that people’s role in society are predestined in the World State may also hold some relevance in our society. Although our position in terms of social and economic class isn’t quite ‘predestined’, studies have shown that people born into wealthier families with relatively high social statuses are more likely to possess a more successful future with similar positions as their progenitor. In addition, both worlds can be compared by the increased use of drugs as an alternative to facing and dealing with harsh realities of the world....   [tags: Brave New World, The World State, Aldous Huxley]

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Analysis Of Aldous Huxley 's ' Brave New World '

- ... The way sex is viewed in society is magnified in Huxley’s novel. In the novel sex is not used for procreation but rather for distraction and recreation. Promiscuity is law and passion and loyalty are seen as uncivilized and unlawful. The “Feelies,” stimulated sex, dehumanized the act of sex and the moral code expected in modern society today. In the novel Fanny(Lenina’s acquaintance) is in disbelief and cautions Lenina against her relationship with Henry. Lenina and Henry had been steady for around 3 months and Fanny warned her of the peculiarity of a steady relationship at her young age....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, Science fiction]

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Analysis Of Aldous Huxley 's ' Brave New World '

- ... God isn 't compatible with machinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness. You must make your choice. Our civilization has chosen machinery and medicine and happiness. That 's why I have to keep these books locked up in the safe." (p. 234). Humans are programmed to accept society’s rules without question or individual thought. In doing so they take away freedoms, such as the freedom to think for oneself. As the novel develops, we begin to understand how the characters in the novel try to avoid facing what the truth of how their society is destroying the individual and free thinking....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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An Analysis Of Aldous Huxley 's ' Brave New World '

- ... This can be equated to how the media socially conditions us today but in less subtle ways. For example, commercials are socially conditioning us into “happy shopping” because the actors always have smiles on their faces when they are buying new clothes, electronics, appliances, etc.., so that viewers feel the need to do the same to be happy. In the stores, there is always upbeat music playing to set a cheerful mood for shoppers because shopping is supposed to be the path to happiness. This is fake happiness because it is a short span of joy that is only obtained through materialistic things....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Analysis Of Aldous Huxley 's ' Brave New World '

- ... Ordinarily one would expect these natural occurrences to just come with any life, but here these are what make life undesirable. This highlights the intense irony that common things are what causes instability. The people in charge of making the Brave New World great strangely find that elements of almost every society are what causes corruptions. Believing that they are superior by blindingly making their citizens live without these common components symbolizes how far from a utopia this is....   [tags: Brave New World, Emotion, Aldous Huxley, Island]

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Analysis Of Aldous Huxley 's ' Brave New World '

- ... The novel states, “From eight to ninety-six buds, and every bud will grow into a perfectly formed embryo, and every embryo into a full-sized adult” (Huxley 12). This kind of scientific advancement clearly shows how far science can go unchecked before getting out of hand. Another example to be reckoned with in the novel is the physical adjustments to embryos, as noted by the director of the hatchery “Nothing like oxygen-shortage for keeping an embryo below par" (Huxley 14). The idea that one set of humans should be able to control the outcomes of others is a ludicrous and unhuman characteristic....   [tags: Brave New World, The World State, Aldous Huxley]

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Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World

- ... Would someone choose to read about the world they are accustomed to, or about a foreign and shocking world. Most would argue the latter. Evidence of such preference lies in Brave New World itself, “But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin” (Huxley 215). John, one of the protagonists, argues against the cleansing of certain ideas. He prefers the good and the bad together; without the bad there wouldn’t be a point or adventure in the information....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, Science fiction]

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Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World

- ... Brave New World is somewhat of a gloomy and depressing novel, and this clearly could have accounted for it. Not long after his mother passing, Huxley became sick and ultimately became blind, which led him into a deeper depression. Huxley had always dreamed about being a scientist like his grandfather, but his sight hindered him from fulfilling his dream, so he pursued a career as a writer instead. He attended a smaller branch of Oxford and graduated from Oxford University while being blind....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World

- ... Ford is not the sagacious originator and ruler of the universe as one denotation of the word God would privilege but he is the center for some of the essential features of the World State. The people seem to ruminate about him often and he is revered in conversation and by mentioning building and such after him. If sex and drug wastage was not part of the Solidarity Services then it could be contemplated religious, but yet isn’t. Soma holds people chastised, as does faith in our world and together they give a sense of happiness and comfort....   [tags: Brave New World, The World State, Aldous Huxley]

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Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World

- ... Brave New World is our world with a surplus of drugs, sex, and people conditioned to think that their life is happy and fair. People in our society look for their “soma” to become instantly relieved of their problems; however, they what they don’t look for is the long term. Soma is a drug that keeps people happy. Everyone has some version of soma that will keep them happy for a brief amount of time. But why do people focus on being happy for a short time rather than forever. The answer is simple....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World

- ... Brave New World’s government is trying to create a utopia without any social instability. One must first understand what instability means to the World State. Instability is anything that could potentially end a civilization. When one forms passion for something, it is dangerous because that passion can be taken away causing one to be left with a broken heart. Social stability is very important to this world because they believe everybody needs to feel happy at all times in order to prosper as a civilization....   [tags: Brave New World, The World State, Aldous Huxley]

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Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World

- ... When situations occur that seem out of the persons control, they turn to alcohol in most cases just to forget whatever issue plagues their mind at that current moment. Sometimes it is finances, others it is relationships, but it could be simple situations such as a bad day at work. No matter the reason, the reason to drink is the same: forget about reality just for a little while. In Brave New World people treat sex as a form of entertainment rather than an expression of love between couples....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World

- ... Embryos that are meant to become members of the epsilon class are treated again using Bokanovsky’s process in which the embryo is forced to bud and give of around 96 other exact replica embryos. This process has some effect with regards to the purity of the specimens, however the impurities are welcomed for the lower level members of society. The society of Brave New World is divided into several social classes that also represent physical and mental characteristics of the members of the group....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, Social class]

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A Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

- ... With a democratic system in place, the government is controlled by the people, and the needs for happiness evolves and it is either provided by the government or by big business. “The world’s stable now. People are happy; they get what they want and they never want what they can’t get.” When dealing with the poor and the homeless the 1st world has much to learn from the World State by creating jobs for them and securing their happiness leads to a greater more stable community. By stabilizing the poor and homeless the possibility of friction between classes and something like the French revolution happening again is close to none....   [tags: Brave New World, The World State, Aldous Huxley]

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Aldous Huxley's Hyperion To A Satyr

- Aldous Huxley's Hyperion To A Satyr Ever since the beginning of mankind’s intellectual evolution, we have felt the need to segregate ourselves from others who we deem pathetic, smelly, and filthy. This separation resultsin two different social groups, the upper class and the lower class. Between these two groups is the great gulf that separates us, the gulf that, according to Huxley’s "Hyperion To A Satyr", prevents humans from achieving the brotherlylove that we need to find our ‘Hyperion’, or place of perfection....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Hyperion Satyr Essays]

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Aldous Huxley’s Hyperion to a Satyr

- We’ve probably all seen a poor, homeless man on the streets. How do we know that he is poor. Is it his personality. I think we all know that the reason we assume that this man is poor is because of his appearance. If we see a man whose clothes are old, torn or dirty, we assume that theman is poor, and because of this, many people view himas a lower form oflife, and not as an equal. Throughout the historyofhuman civilization,dirt has been a very common symbol that humans havecometo associate withthe poor or lower classes in our society....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Hyperion to a Satyr]

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Analysis Of Aldous Huxley 's ' The Assassination Of Margaret Thatcher August 6th 1983 '

- ... Two thousand million inhabitants… only ten thousand names between them”. This clearly emphasises the loss of individuality. The hyperbolic representation of “two thousand million” demonstrates the lack of individuality. The mere fact that huxleys representation of a society in world state is similar to the audiences society, in terms of its composition allows the responder to understand huxleys idea regarding the impact political acts may have on individuals. Furthermore, to reemphasise the point that conditioning is a political act that limits individuality is evident when he characterises Mustapha Mond to say, “murder only kills the individual… and after all, what’s an individual....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, Individual]

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Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World And The Tempest By William Shakespeare

- ... Aboard this boat is the King of Naples. Miranda, watching the ship from shore is frantic after her father, Prospero, created the storm. Ariel, Prospero’s servant spirit, destroys the ships and scatters the passengers across the island where he is ordered to spy on them. Ferdinand, a passenger from the boat, meets Miranda where the two fall in love and against Prospero’s orders, marry. Ariel casts a spell on the other shipwreck survivors and arranges for goblins to “grind their joints”. After putting them through much misery Prospero forgives them and grants them their freedom....   [tags: Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, The World State]

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Satire Of Consumerism : Aldous Huxley 's Brave New World

- ... Examples of this practice include cars, with new “upgraded” models every year, and ink cartridges that are designed to quit working after a period of time, even if ink is still left. In the World State, a widespread example of planned obsolescence is clothing. Everyone has a superfluous amount of clothing that is only worn once or twice. For example, every time we see Lenina in the story, she has on a different outfit, and even though they are always green, the clothing always changes. This consuming of outfits is partly due to the sleep teachings everyone goes through, but also because the clothes are designed to disintegrate over a period of time....   [tags: Brave New World, The World State, Aldous Huxley]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Distortion is an image. An illusion of a thought or an idea that appears to have a single affect on a society; however, it provides an image on society that is completely different....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Humans have transformed their social organization, time and time again. Social separation has existed since the Neolithic Revolution. Very recently, we have begun to head down a dangerous path to what we can call a Brave New World. A “Brave New World” is one in which those in charge begin to intrude on the lives of individuals to the extent that the government has so much control that it begins to create human beings artificially. This path first started with encroaching technologies such as cameras and wire-tapping....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World]

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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

- Aldous Huxley's Brave New World I stood in front of the television screen in horror and disbelief at 10 o'clock on September 11, 2001. Watching as the second plane struck the World Trade Center in a fiery ball of destruction, I thought for sure that this world as we know it was coming to an abrupt end. Seeing the first tower fall and then the second, with over 100 stories each now a pile of twisted steel and death made me want to vomit. In two short hours, the stability of America’s foundation became questionable....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World]

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Analysis of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Analysis of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World by Aldous Huxley was published in 1932 after two major global events- World War Two from 1914-1918 and The Great Depression of 1929-1933. These two events changed the way people saw the world and made people see the events were beyond the control of individuals and even governments. Also at this time the world was seeing the rise in technology and the view that science could help solve some of the problems. Much of the technology has been developed because of the war and the mass of people had suffered because of it....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley Essays]

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The Unexpected Downside of Science Explored in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

- The Unexpected Downside of Science Explored in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Since the first day that humans were put on this earth, they have been curious and have searched for ways to become more efficient. Throughout the years they have created tools to better serve them, created clothing to keep them warm, built homes to protect them from the elements, and produced transportation methods to transport them across the world. In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1932), the human race has evolved to being extremely efficient in everything that they do....   [tags: Brave New World Aldous Huxley]

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Society Exposed in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

- Society Exposed in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World One may think that the society in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is a gross representation of the future, but perhaps our society isn’t that much different. In his foreword to the novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley envisioned this statement when he wrote: "To make them love it is the task assigned, in present-day totalitarian states, to ministries of propaganda...." Thus, through hypnopaedic teaching (brainwashing), mandatory attendance to community gatherings, and the use of drugs to control emotions, Huxley bitterly satirized the society in which we live....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World]

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The High Cost of Stability in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

- The High Cost of Stability in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Conditioning the citizens to like what they have and reject what they do not have is an authoritative government’s ideal way of maximizing efficiency. The citizens will consume what they are told to, there will be no brawls or disagreements and the state will retain high profits from the earnings. People can be conditioned chemically and physically prior to birth and psychologically afterwards. The novel, Brave New World, takes place in the future, 632 A....   [tags: Aldous Huxley Brave New World]

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Huxley: Family Life Is Very Much Feared Within The Utopian Society

- Within one of his most controversial yet compelling literary works, Aldous Huxley never fails to create a masterpiece of interwoven plots, characters, philosophies, and dilemmas faced by the citizens of the supposed Utopia. Upon first glance, the reader is entirely mesmerized by Huxley’s extraordinary ability to construct a world unlike any other; a world complete with fully complacent citizens, political stability, and even an organized system of social class. However, as the reader progresses further into the book, they are at once shocked by the misconception that the citizens live in a perfect world....   [tags: Aldous Huxley ]

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Biography of Aldous Huxley

- Aldous Leonard Huxley was born, in the English countryside, on July 26, 1894 to Leonard and Julia Huxley. He was their third child. His siblings were Julian, Trevenen, and Margaret. His father was the son of T. H. Huxley, a brilliant scientist, and his mother, Julia, was the great-niece of Matthew Arnold, a poet-philosopher. He was unusual and bright but not immediately academically distinguished (Hara 4). His mother had started a school for girls and that is where Huxley first started to bloom....   [tags: writer, love, technology]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Brave New World was written by Aldous Huxley in 1931. It is set in the future and portrays the negative effects of a controlled government on society. This timeless novel also shows the effects of increased technology, psychological manipulation and uniformity in society. Huxley predicts what the world will be like in AD 2450. The vast majority of the population is controlled under the World State; a peaceful, stable society where there is an abundance of goods because their economy is based off of commercialism....   [tags: government, society, control]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Aldous Huxley was a British writer. He was born on July 26, 1894, and died on November 22, 1963. He was most known for his fifth novel, Brave New World, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Huxley was born in Godalming in the Surrey County in southern England. Huxley was the son of an English schoolteacher, Julia Arnold, and a writer, Leonard. Huxley intended to become a doctor. But having contracted keratitis, which is an eye disease resulting in near blindness, he was forced to change his profession....   [tags: biography, profession, awards]

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Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

- In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, a haunting warning of a possible future for the world is presented to readers. The novel’s world is composed of dystopian strata plagued by a dependence on drugs, technology, and a well-defined social class system. Huxley’s uncanny foresight specific to segregation and social class strata is startling because readers do not expect to find aspects of Brave New World’s segregation and class structure in modern-day American society. Although it was written in the mid-1930s, Huxley’s Brave New World contains themes of blatant segregation and a tiered social class system similar to that of contemporary society....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Theme, Society]

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Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

- Aldous Huxley explores the concept of a utopian and human perfection in his novel, Brave New World. The story is about a world in which controllers have created order for the citizens of the world. They have also gained obedience from practically every person. Children are no longer born, they are grown. In these factories, children are conditioned and brainwashed into becoming whatever the Controllers, the leaders of this global government, wish them to be. As such a society in which everyone has a place and a purpose is born....   [tags: Community, Identity, Stability]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is far more relevant today and has a higher possibility of actually transpiring in the near future compared to George Orwell’s 1984. Even though both of the two, which are totalitarian societies, are based on plausible premises, the utopia illustrated in Brave New World still has a opportunity to appear today, while the “Big Brother” controlled society presented in George Orwell’s 1984, being based off of totalitarian societies to some extent that existed at the time the book was written, is simply obsolete....   [tags: Utopia, Analysis]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- In Aldous Huxley's novel, "Brave New World" he introduces a character named, Bernard Marx an alpha part of the upper higher class who does not quite fit in. Bernard is cursed by the surrounding rumors of something going wrong during his conditioning that he becomes bitter and isolates himself from those around him in the World State. Huxley's character experiences both alienation and enrichment to being exiled from a society that heavily relies on technology and forms of entertainment with little to no morals....   [tags: exile, alienated, bernard marx]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Brave New World Analysis 1/3 1) One of the biggest conflicts witnessed so far in the first 90 pages of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is the internal one within the main protagonist, Bernard Marx. Throughout the book, Bernard encounters a violent conflict within himself. He was born different from everyone else, and he finds himself many times questioning the system, he feels that there is much more to be/accomplish in life than just having sex and playing ‘obstacle golf’. Bernard is conflicted if he should share how he feels with the rest of the world and reveal his thoughts, or if he should just keep his mouth shut because all he really wants is to fit in....   [tags: bernard marx, utopian society]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- In 1932, after the First World War new enhancements in technological practices and government control were now in effect. Aldous Huxley was one of the many citizens who wrote literature to describe what future life would entail. Huxley wrote, in the novel, Brave New World that the ideals that were significant in the past will no longer be important in the future. Throughout the last few decades world view has become trivial about everything people think, act and speak about. All events that occur within Brave New World happen because the World State wants to have better government control over the individuality and happiness that the citizens possess....   [tags: drugs, self-inflicted deaths]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Theme or Concept Examined in Brave New World “Brave New World,” is a novel written by Aldous Huxley where he explains that everything is based on a futuristic science which he claimed sprang forth from him because of his experience as “an ordered universe in a world of plan less incoherence” (River 4 1974). People seem to care more about temporal things rather than emotions. Technology also seems to be the most important aspect and everyone is affected by it in one way or another, whether if it is negative or positive....   [tags: futuristic science, westernized, technocracy]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World illustrates a perfect society: “community, identity, stability” (Huxley 7). This superb environment, however, is only achieved through the dehumanization of each individual. The world is run by world-controllers, a powerful oligarchy, whom have successfully brainwashed, or conditioned, children for the sole purpose of controlling their minds (Biderman 549). In result, individuals have lost their ability to think and act for themselves. Children are stripped of human rights, even before conditioning, by being a product of governmental test tube reproduction....   [tags: community, dehumanization, brainwashing]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- ... Even after birth they continue to follow the motto of the World State: “Community, Identity, Stability”(21). This motto is extremely ironic having the words identity and stability in it as the World State has sacrificed identity for stability. Shock therapy is also used to force children to hate certain objects. The director explains, “They'll grow up with what the psychologists used to call an ‘instinctive' hatred of books and flowers. Reflexes unalterably conditioned"(26). This entire process is sustained by the distribution of the drug soma, aka the miracle drug....   [tags: individualism, bio mechanical technology]

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Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

- Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is written with the idea of a totalitarian society that has complete social stability. Huxley demonstrates how a stable world deprives a person of their individuality, something that was also lost in Anthem by Ayn Rand. Brave New World exemplifies the great sacrifice needed to achieve such a stable world. This novel envisions a world where the government has complete control over people in its mission for social stability and conformity. The outcome of this is that the government has created a society with no love, freedom, creativity, and the human desire for happiness....   [tags: literary analysis, totalitarianism]

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Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

- The story of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley depicts a utopian society conflicted by stability. People are oblivious to the morals and ethics upheld by their ancestors 600 years before and, in turn, are demoralized. Babies are born in laboratories, relationships last no longer than "bedtime", and drugs are provided by government for daily use by their citizens. The drug, "soma" symbolizes estatic rapture experienced by the gloomy looking for escape, material religion for those looking for comfort from a supernatural force, abused aphrodisiac for lovers looking to have a good time, and complete technocracy from a government using a controlled substance to dominate the minds of its people....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Summary]

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Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

- When people think of the progress and advances in the field of science, they are usually under the preconception that most discoveries and advancements in technologies are advantageous. Are these advancements as beneficial to society as people think they are. Or do they just lay raise to confusion between what can be considered morally and ethically permissible. In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley illustrates the dangers of scientific progress and its effects on our society, particularly in the field of biology....   [tags: story analysis, dystopian societies]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- A Godless World With Orgies Think about a world where you first experience sex when you’re a little kid. A world where books and flowers might not be respected but you're conditioned to be happy. Conditioned to have sex with anyone you want, whenever you feel like it. It's true that you don't have to worry about violence and when you start feeling stressed, all you have to take is soma (a drug that creates pleasure and happiness.) then feel better. In the story, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, that’s how their world worked and I do not believe that our world will ever come to a point like it....   [tags: sex experience, prostitution business, violence]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Brave New World, a novel written by Aldous Huxley, can be compared and contrasted with an episode of The Twilight Zone, a fantasy, science-fiction television series, called “Number 12 Looks Just Like You.” Brave New World is a highly regarded and renowned work of literature as The Twilight Zone is considered one of the greatest television series of all time. Brave New World and The Twilight Zone’s episode “Number 12 Looks Just Like You” can be compared and contrasted on the basis of science, youth, and the government....   [tags: twilight zone, science-fiction]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Brave New World is a book written by Aldous Huxley in 1932. This novel has been praised and condemned over time. It questions the way society is run today; the individual is sacrificed for the state, and science is the main focus for control. This book is a masterpiece of science fiction and also dystopian literature. The people in the society live dehumanized lives, and everything in the society is negative due to the interference of a higher power. It is evident that America today is evolving into the world state, just like in the book....   [tags: book review, story and character analysis]

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Aldous Huxley’s Warning to America

- A dystopia- “an imaginary place or state in which the condition of life is extremely bad, as from deprivation, oppression, or terror” (Dystopia). Aldous Huxley demonstrates just that in his book Brave New World. In Brave New World Huxley creates a perfectly stable society through using clones. This society achieved this stability through the administering and conditioning of the brain. Huxley an extreme humanist feared this future society because of the work of other extremist with theories that could not be proven (Chunk) Sigmund Freud known as he father of psychoanalysis, was a physiologist, medical doctor, and influential thinker of the early twentieth century” (Thornton), he came up with...   [tags: Brave New World Essays]

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Aldous Huxley And The Brave New World

- Within any novel, there are always elements taken directly from the author's life and experiences. Their thoughts and opinions will also be imparted to the novel, delivering a direct message to the reader and perhaps arguing their opinions, to persuade the audience. These influences on and from his environment are apparent in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. In the 1930's, the time the book was written, many world-scale events were taking place, and society was changing as a whole. All of this no doubt affected Huxley, and resulted in one the most powerful, thought provoking novels....   [tags: Brave New World Huxley]

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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

- How valuable is the protection of individuality. In a society dominated by falsified, scientifically manufactured happiness, individuality proves a rarity. Aldous Huxley’s speculative novel, Brave New World, demonstrates the consequences of this type of impassive society. Bernard, Helmholtz, and John are all unique from their peers, and they think individually as a result. Because of their individuality, the group is ultimately banned from civilization and sent to a remote location. Being segregated because of appearance or mental capacity and not subject to society’s influences stimulates individuality; however, the knowledge and truth correlating with individuality comes at a price, in thi...   [tags: story and literary analysis]

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Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

- Aldous Huxley brings a futuristic novel, riddled with human follies and satire. Huxley wrote during the progressive and post-depression periods, which is reflected by the issues in which he satirizes. Brave New World is a futuristic novel that explores the hypothetical advancements of technology and effects or improvements on society. The novel sets a social system similar to that of medieval England in which people are “born” into castes. This sets the stage for the numerous social battles, which ensue as the novel develops....   [tags: Brave New World Huxley]

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Huxley's Message in Brave New World

- Huxley's Hidden Message Aldous Huxley has a humanistic, deep and enlightened view of how society should be, and of what constitutes true happiness. In his novel, Brave New World, he shows his ideas in a very obscure manner. Huxley presents his ideas in a satirical fashion. This sarcastic style of writing helped Huxley show his views in a very captivating and insightful manner. The entire novel describes a dystopia in which intimate relationships, the ability to choose one's destiny, and the importance of family are strictly opposed....   [tags: Aldous Huxley]

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"The Doors of Perception" by Aldous Huxley

- "The Doors of Perception" by Aldous Huxley The Doors of Perception, written by Aldous Huxley in 1954 was the first essay of its kind to deal with not only the physical effects of mescaline but also attempted to rationalize the fundamental needs satisfied by the drug by its takers. Mescaline is the active chemical in peyote, a wild cactus that grows in the American Southwest and Northern Mexico. Huxley volunteered to boldly go where few Americans other than chemists, native Americans, and researchers dared to go by ingesting synthesized mescaline in a controlled experiment to measure it's psychological effects....   [tags: Papers]

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A Reflection on Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

- Literature is both shaped by our culture and shapes it. Because of this it is an effective representation of the culture of a time. One can tell how people were affected by the events of the times by how it comes through in their writing. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is a prime example of this. The work was targeted at people in a post WWI world. This is a time between WWI and WWII where the world is still shocked by how rapidly the science of war had advanced. People also continue to be appalled with the mass death of a World War caused by such technology and therefore yearn for a more stable world....   [tags: Brave New World Literary Analysis ]

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Outcasts in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Aldous Huxley once wrote, “If one's different, one's bound to be lonely.” This is clearly a statement about public acceptance and tolerance of dissimilar people. Aldous’ beliefs can be seen in his book, Brave New World by two outcast characters, John Savage and Bernard Marx. Bernard and John are both outspoken about their ideas on society, but differ in their actions when faced with temptations. Although many citizens are conditioned to appreciate the community they live in, both Bernard and John are frank and communicate their controversial views openly....   [tags: controversial, citizens, government, society]

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Aldous Huxley’s Dystopia as Relating to Society Today

- Technology is the application of scientific knowledge that deals with the creation and use of technical means and their interrelation with life, society, and the environment. It concerns itself with such subjects as industrial arts, engineering, applied science and pure science and is utilized for practical purposes. Though technology offers a variety of gadgets that work to the advance of humanity, it can also harm society extensively by dispersing a certain degree of power to individuals that can be abused....   [tags: George Orwell, Contrasts]

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Overview of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

- In Aldous Huxley's self-created dystopian society, controlled by biotechnology, genetics are edited to perfection and babies are manufactured in bottles through Ectogenesis1. After visiting America in the Roaring Thirties, Huxley admired the confidence, vitality, and "generous extravagance" he found in American life and the American people. However, he began to see the destructive spiral that Totalitarianism had on society, especially with his experiences in Italy under the reign of fascist leader Benito Mussolini (Barron's Educational Series)....   [tags: genetics, biotechnology, conditioning]

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Overuse of Antidepressants Today and How Aldous Huxley Predicted It

- ... Part of the high growth in the usage of antidepressants was because doctors were prescribing the drug to children younger than 6. The number of “antidepressant prescriptions written for teens increases every year” (Mitchell). That statistic should be going down because teenagers do not know if they are really depressed or if they just had a bad day. By the doctor just giving them medicine teenagers will never learn how to deal with their problems and how to fix certain situation. By prescribing the medication children and teens are learning how to take the easy way out, by resorting to taking drugs....   [tags: A Brave New World]

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Analysis Of Aldous Huxley 's ' Brave New World '

- ... Donald Hall shows this issue when he writes, “Therefore the first step toward changing the status quo is consciousness raising”(Hall 78). Unfair class status is must have in social structure according to Hall for the society to have social stability. There is no such thing as individuals because they cannot be stable without the complete obedience to the government. An example of this in today’s society is a group of people are stable with their job earning the minimum wage and they are satisfied with it than having no job and income for them to survive every single day of their life....   [tags: Marxism, Social class, Bourgeoisie, Working class]

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Value in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Value in Brave New World What is value. To take a logical standpoint, it could be defined as the monetary worth of something: a candy bar’s value is one dollar. But to most people, value is more far reaching than a number. To chocolate lovers, a candy bar’s value is a few minutes of bliss; the chocolate hits your tongue and melts; the overwhelming decadence of that smooth, velvety sweetness is enough to keep you happy for the rest of the day. So, value is all about perspective, and it is also a driving force in motivation: value drives people....   [tags: benito hoover, industrial revolution]

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A Brave New World: Was Aldous Huxley Correct?

- A Brave New World, written by Aldous Huxley, is a book that to me is more of a warning then entertainment. In the book, Huxley writes about a future civilization and all how everything in life is simplified. Babies are created in factories and are designed however scientists want them to be. Relationships are completely irrelevant and frowned upon in this world. People are distracted from true beauty and left to submit their selves into a false world. Since this book was written in 1931, Huxley obviously had no knowledge of new age technology....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]

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The Dystopian Society of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- A dystopia is an imaginary, imperfect place where those who dwell are faced with terrible circumstances. The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley illustrates the concept of a dystopia. A utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect, but in the novel, it becomes apparent that the author is trying to demonstrate the negative effects on a society when it attempts to become an unreachable utopian society. Brave New World is seen as a dystopia for many reasons, as citizens are deprived of freedom, programmed to be emotionless and under the control of a corrupt dictatorship....   [tags: story analysis, sociological analysis]

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Analysis Of Aldous Huxley 's ' Fahrenheit 451 '

- ... In effect of destroying most of the country’s population, most of the society would be destroyed; government offices, large schools, sports arenas and all things the society favoured most. Those living in small towns or off the land who usually disagreed with the government’s values, were generally unaffected, allowing them to begin their own society. The international government put in place in Brave New World allows for every nation to keep peace, as there are no set countries, rather state-like sections....   [tags: Dystopia, Brave New World, Fahrenheit 451]

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The World State in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

- Happiness is what every human seeks; its human nature. Happiness, however one defines it as, can come at a price. Societies all around the world view happiness differently, but in a futuristic novel, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, happiness is supposedly an inevitable feeling gained at the cost of freedom. This novel explores a “World State” in which the majority of the society feels no strong emotion, complies with their assigned caste, and behave almost identically to the next person (Huxley, 220)....   [tags: happiness, thought, society]

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley and Technology

- “COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY”: this is the World State's motto in a science fiction novel “Brave New World” written by Aldous Leonard Huxley in 1932. Huxley predicts the future world ironically, and I assume everyone hopes his prediction will not come true. Fortunately, Huxley’s brave new world is just a fictional world; no one knows whether Huxley’s brave new world will become a reality or not. However, technology improves rapidly and scares people that their world is gradually approaching to Huxley’s brave new world....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Community, Identity]

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Utopian Society in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

- “There is always soma, delicious soma, half a gramme for a half-holiday, a gramme for a week-end, two grammes for a trip to the gorgeous East, three for a dark eternity on the moon, returning whence they find themselves on the other side of the crevice, safe on the solid ground of daily labour and distraction, scampering from feely to feely, from girl to pneumatic girl, from Electromagnetic Golf course to …" Huxley implies that by abrogating dreadfulness and mental torment, the brave new worlders have disposed of the most significant and brilliant encounters that life can offer also....   [tags: Pharmaceudicas, Drugs]

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Satire in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

- Aldous Huxley. The very name summons psychedelic visions and utopian nightmares to the western psyche. He was born on the 26th of July in 1894, and died on the 22nd of November 1963. He saw the turn of the century, two world wars, the decline of the British lion, the ascendance of the American eagle and the Cuban missile crisis. In short, he lived through some of the most unstable times man has seen as a species. His work was varied. He began his career as a satirist of the class system he endured in England....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]

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