Your search returned 21 essays for "Alcestis":

The Theme of Alcestis

- The Theme of Alcestis       Alcestis by Euripides is distinct from other Greek Tragedy, due to its fairy tale origins. It was the fourth play in a set and would therefore have taken the place of a satyr-play. Satyr-plays were usually a light, comic play used as a form of relief from the previous heavy tragedies. The play has its comic elements, Heracles and Death playing the main comic figures but is there a more serious meaning hidden within the comedy. Philip Vellacott in his introduction to a collection of Euripides' plays, states that the main theme of the play is the "unequal relationship of man to woman." He believes this theme to be a reading of the play that would not be a...   [tags: Alcestis]

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Penelope and Alcestis as Ideal Greek Females

- Penelope of the Odyssey and Alcestis of Alcestis as Ideal Greek Females    Although there is some disagreement concerning the Greek’s definition of the ideal female, there is little disagreement that two women represented this Greek ideal. The character of Penelope of Homer's Odyssey 1 and Alcestis of Euripides' Alcestis 2, came to represent the same ideal of female excellence. The Greeks referred to this ideal female as a sophron woman. The qualities possessed by a sophron woman are tangible; she is a good housekeeper, a nurturer of her husband, a child-bearer....   [tags: Homer's Odyssey Euripides' Alcestis]

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Power for Women in Alcestis and Hippolytus

- Is it feasible that through the loss of one’s life and being, one would be able to gain influence and power. Does this fatal gain of power show a previous lack of it. Does forgoing one’s life for an honorable cause improve a woman’s reputation in turn giving her more power. Through our studies, we have discovered that typically women exhibit a limited amount of agency in ancient Greece. Women occasionally assert dominance in the household; although, even within the home they posses limited influence over their husbands....   [tags: Greece Greek Play Plays Essays]

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Alcestis

- Alcestis is a myth that is "the most touching of all the Greek dramas to a modern audience" (Lind 213). It is a tragicomedy by the playwright Euripides and it centers on the king and queen of Thessalia. Admetus, the king, has been fated to die yet, due to his alliance with Apollo, is given the chance to find a replacement. His wife, Alcestis, volunteers for the position claiming that she cannot imagine life without her husband. After Alcestis submits her life, Admetus discovers the pain of loss and even determines that Alcestis is the lucky one in dying....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Women in Euripides' Alcestis, Medea, Andromache, and Bacchae

- Euripides portrayal of women in his plays has been somewhat bizarre. His female characters kill out of revenge, kill out of jealousy and kill because a god possessed them too. In Alcestis and Andromache Euripides does produce classic heroic female characters. The women in Medea and The Bacchae are not your typical heroines but serve to show the same theme of female liberation as the women in Alcestis and Andromache. While Alcestis is straight forward with its message, the other three plays mask their true intentions from the people they are created to oppose....   [tags: Females Euripides Plays]

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Women in Ancient Greece

- Euripides, one of Ancient Greece’s most famous playwrights, could be considered as one of the earliest supporters of women’s rights. With plays such as Alcestis and Medea, he clearly puts an emphasis on the condition of women, and even integrates them in the Chorus of the latter play, a feat that was not often done in Ancient Greece. Throughout the years, it has been argued that the two central characters in each of those plays offer conflicting representations of women in those times, and I can safely say that I agree with that argument....   [tags: Ancient Greece ]

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Roman Sarcophagus : Mythological Scenes Since The 2nd And 3rd Century Ad

- Roman sarcophagus depicted mythological scenes since the 2nd and 3rd century AD, and over time we can see a gradual change in the way these myths were depicted. Beginning as a set of stories, they transformed into an expressive medium through which the myth could explicitly commemorate the live of the deceased and a way so Roman cultural requirements could be presented and explored. Specifically, myths that depict heroes on sarcophagi usually stress the virtue of the hero and the grief felt at their death....   [tags: Afterlife, Life, Death, AfterLife]

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Death and its Personofication in Greek Mythology and Other Cultures

- Death “The fear of death is deeply embedded in us” (Cave 1). Death is something that everyone fears. As humans we like to believe that we are inhuman and that death will never affect us. It’s the ugly side of life that no one likes to think about. It doesn’t matter what race, culture, or region we are, we’ll all die. Many believe that when we die we go to heaven or hell, but what happens to our body after we are dead. Do we float on to parallel universe, or does our body just appear wherever we are destined to be....   [tags: Cultures, Religion]

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Hellenistic Marriages Can Be Mutually Supportive

- Hellenistic views of marriage are very different from modern views in many ways, and because of these differences, it can be easy to dismiss archaic and Athenian marriages as loveless or purely functional. However, it should be noted that there are definite examples of these marriages being mutually supportive and loving. One can see these characteristics especially well in two works, Oeconomicus by Xenophon, and Alcestis by Euripides. Although different, these two stories demonstrate both the mutual support and love that can be found in Hellenistic marriages....   [tags: Marry Sacrifice Love Essays]

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Euripides: A Greek Playwright

- Euripides: A Greek Playwright Euripides is a keen witness to the human character and the father of the psychological theater. His plays were modern at the time compared to others because of the way he focused on the personal lives and motives of his characters, in a manner that was unfamiliar to Greek audiences. His plays have often been seen, in simple terms, bad because critics have been unable to comprehend his visions....   [tags: Greek Play Euripides Biography]

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Euripides Support of Women’s Rights

- Euripides Support of Women’s Rights       One can hardly deny that in Euripides’ plays women are often portrayed as weak, uncertain, and torn between what they must do and what they can bring themselves to do.  Other women appear to be the root of grave evils, or simply perpetrators of heinous crimes.  In a day when analysis of characters and plot had yet to be invented, it is easy to see why he might have been thought to be very much against women.  However, when looking back with current understanding of what Euripides was doing at the time, armed with knowledge of plot devices and Socratic philosophy, this argument simply does not hold up.  In fact, a very strong argument can be made t...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Forms of Love in Plato's Symposium

- Love, in classical Greek literature, is commonly considered as a prominent theme. Love, in present days, always appears in the categories of books, movies or music, etc. Interpreted differently by different people, Love turns into a multi-faceted being. In Plato’s work Symposium, Phaedrus, Pausania, Eryximachus, Aristophane and Agathon, each of them presents a speech to either praise or definite Love. Phaedrus first points out that Love is the primordial god; Pausanias brings the theme of “virtue” into the discussion and categorizes Love into “good” one or “bad” one; Eryximachus introduces the thought of “moderation’ and thinks that Love governs such fields as medicine and music; Aristophane...   [tags: Plato, Symposium, nature of love, relationships]

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Male homoeroticism in Plato's Symposium and the Greek lyric poets: Complimentary or contradictory?

- Male homoeroticism in Plato's Symposium and the Greek lyric poets: Complimentary or contradictory. Works Cited Missing Images of male homosocial and homoerotic relations pervade Athenian culture. From plays to poetry and jugs to the justice system one can find these relations represented pictorially and in words. But do all these images align with each other or are there irreconcilable differences between them. To look at this question we will take two small pieces of culture, a philosophical treatise, Plato's Symposium and the lyric poetry of Theognis and Anacreon....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Essays]

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The Movement of Liminal Women and its Consequences in Early Greek Myth

- The Movement of Liminal Women and its Consequences in Early Greek Myth The title of this paper takes as its cue Blondell et al's Women on the Edge: Four Plays by Euripides, [1] which argues in its introduction that "[w]omen in tragedy often disrupt 'normal' life by their words and actions: they speak out boldly, tell lies, cause public unrest, violate custom, defy orders, even kill." (Blondell, Gamel, Rabinowitz, Sorkin and Zweig. 1999, x) The four plays selected by the editors - Alcestis, Medea, Helen and Iphigenia at Aulis offer "examples of women who support the status quo and women who oppose and disrupt it." (Blondell, Gamel, Rabinowitz, Sorkin and Zweig....   [tags: Euripides Women Females Myths Essays]

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The Down to Earth Challenges of Space Exploration

- The Down to Earth Challenges of Space Exploration Humans have dreamed of leaving the earth and traveling space for many years, and up to this day they have taken many steps in the right direction. Yet, with every new frontier they approach, new problems loom over the horizon. All problems involved with space exploration may not directly involve space itself. Many of those problems surface right here on Earth. Some of the easier issues have been resolved, such as escaping the forces of gravity to reach outer space....   [tags: Space Exploration Essays]

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1332 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

The Esssence of Rebirth and Death in Literature

- The Essence of Rebirth and Death in Literature Literature has always been a powerful way for people to express their ideas, opinions, and feelings. Authors often use literature to depict aspects of society that can affect a man or woman’s life. In the stories, “The Horse Dealer’s Daughter,” Life in the Iron Mills, “Barbie Doll,” and The Awakening the women of the stories do not seem to adapt to societal expectations. The inadequacy of the women of these stories to meet the view of society has lead to either a rebirth or ultimately a drive to suicide....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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The Underworld, Logos, and the Poetic Imagination

- The Underworld, Logos, and the Poetic Imagination I In the Odyssey of Homer, Odysseus travels to the underworld and meets the soul of Achilles, who bitterly comments on existence after death: O shining Odysseus, never try to console me for dying. I would rather follow the plow as thrall to another man, one with no land allotted him and not much to live on, than be a king over all the perished dead.[1] The ancient Greek interpretation of death, as expressed by Homer, portrays the Underworld as a horrible place, terrifying in its monotony and lack of meaning; and Death is something to be feared and avoided as long as possible....   [tags: Essays Papers]

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The Poetry of A. E. Housman

- The Poetry of A. E. Housman Housman was born in Burton-On-Trent, England, in 1865, just as the US Civil War was ending. As a young child, he was disturbed by the news of slaughter from the former British colonies, and was affected deeply. This turned him into a brooding, introverted teenager and a misanthropic, pessimistic adult. This outlook on life shows clearly in his poetry. Housman believed that people were generally evil, and that life conspired against mankind. This is evident not only in his poetry, but also in his short stories....   [tags: essays research papers]

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T.s. Eliot

- As one of America's first modernist poets, T. S. Eliot's unique style and subject matter would have a dramatic influence on writers for the century to come. Born in 1888 in St. Louis Mo. at the tail end of the "Cowboy era" he grew up in the more civilized industrial era of the early 20th century, a time of the Wright Brothers and Henry Ford. The Eliot family was endowed with some of the best intellectual and political connections in America of that time, and as a result went to only the best schools....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato's Symposium

- Plato's Symposium In the Symposium, Plato gives us one of the most close-up and personal pictures of Socrates we have. Socrates himself never wrote a line that we know of; all that we know of him (his personality, his views, his biography) we get through Plato's ey es and pen. We cannot, therefore, know how accurate or embellished this account is. The elaborate way Plato introduces the "story" of the Symposium may lead you to believe that it is a fiction, just as the other works we will read this semester are....   [tags: Papers]

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Bacchae Essay

- In Euripides’ play The Bacchae, the ideals that were the foundation of Greek culture were called into question. Until early 400B.C.E. Athens was a society founded upon rational thinking, individuals acting for the good of the populace, and the “ideal” society. This is what scholars commonly refer to as the Hellenic age of Greek culture. As Athens is besieged by Sparta, however, the citizens find themselves questioning the ideals that they had previously lived their lives by. Euripides’ play The Bacchae shows the underlying shift in ideology of the Greek people from Hellenic (or classical), to Hellenistic; the god character Dionysus will be the example that points to the shifting Greek ideolo...   [tags: Ancient Greece]

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Your search returned 21 essays for "Alcestis":