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A Passage to India by E.M. Forster

- A Passage to India by E.M. Forster Upon a most rudimentary evaluation, A Passage to India is simply a story, a tale of two countries through which we follow a handful of central characters. As readers, we watch as these characters travel from England to India, into mosques and temples and through caves....   [tags: Forster Passage India]

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A Clash of Cultures in A Passage To India

-       A Passage To India is a classic example of how different cultures, when forced to intermix, misunderstand each other, and what consequences stem from those misunderstandings. All of Forster's greatest works deal with the failure of humans being able to communicate satisfactorily, and their failure to eliminate prejudice to establish possible relationships. A Passage To India is no exception. (Riley, Moore 107) To understand Forster's motive, it must be established that he is a humanistic writer....   [tags: A Passage To India Essays]

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Modernism in Forster's A Passage to India

- Modernism in Forster's A Passage to India       When considering the novels of E.M. Forster, it is natural to recall the reserved landscapes of the Merchant and Ivory cinematic versions. Gauzy images - green hills, languorous boat rides, tender embraces - these impressions, cousins, really, to Jane Austen's plots and settings, are remembered as period pieces seldom associated with the literary experimentation of Virginia Woolf or the winsome angst of the lost War poets. It seems - does it not....   [tags: Forster Passage to India Essays]

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Cultural Misunderstanding in A Passage to India

- Cultural Misunderstanding in A Passage to India One of the major themes of E. M. Forster's novel A Passage to India is cultural misunderstanding. Differing cultural ideas and expectations regarding hospitality, social proprieties, and the role of religion in daily life are responsible for misunderstandings between the English and the Muslim Indians, the English and the Hindu Indians, and between the Muslims and Hindus. Aziz tells Fielding at the end of the novel, "It is useless discussing Hindus with me....   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

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Mysticism in A Passage to India

- Mysticism in Forester's A Passage to India       The figure of Mrs. Moore, and the problem of what happened to her in the extraordinary Marabar Caves, has fascinated critics for decades. The question has absorbed attention to a degree that does not correspond to the secondary role that Mrs. Moore plays in the plot of A Passage to India. On the surface, she is a supporting character, yet many of the unresolved issues of the novel seem to be concentrated in her experience. Mrs. Moore arrives in India a sympathetic figure, and departs unresponsive and uncaring, transformed beyond recognition by the mysterious voice of the Marabar....   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

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Forster's Comic Irony in A Passage to India

- A Passage to India - Forster's Comic Irony What aspect of A Passage to India justifies the novel's superiority over Forster's other works. Perhaps it is the novel's display of Forster's excellent mastery of several literary elements that places it among the greatest novels of the twentieth century. Among these literary elements, Forster's comic irony stands out, and throughout the entire novel, the author satirizes the English, the Indians, and the Anglo-Indian relationship. Frederick P....   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

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Free College Essays - Hindu Influence in A Passage to India

- A Passage to India - Hindu Influence Several different literary elements work in tandem to produce the magic seen in E. M. Forster's A Passage to India. Because this novel was presented to the world less than a decade after World War I, the fantastic and exotic stories of India seized the attention of the relatively provincial society of the day, and the novel's detailed presentation of Hinduism certainly excited the imaginations of thousands of readers. Benita Parry supports this assertion when saying, "Hinduism takes its place at the core of the novel just as it lies at the heart of India" (164)....   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

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The Important Role of the Marabar Caves in A Passage to India

- The Important Role of the Marabar Caves in A Passage to India       During the fourteen years that followed the publication of Howards End, Edward Morgan Forster underwent a harsh mood change that culminated in the publication of A Passage to India, Forster's bitterest book (Shusterman 159).  Forster was not alone in his transition to a harsher tone in his fiction.  A Passage to India was written in the era that followed the First World War.  George Thomson writes that the novel "may be viewed as a reaction to the disappearance of God in the nineteenth century....  Twentieth century writers have symbolized this world without God as a wasteland" (293).  Post- w...   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

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An Inward Collapse of the Human Perspective in Forster's A Passage to India

- An Inward Collapse of the Human Perspective in Forster's A Passage to India        The reverberation of sound in the form of an echo is threaded throughout E.M. Forster's A Passage to India, and the link between the echo and the hollowness of the human spirit is depicted in the text. The echo is not heard in the beginning of the text when the English newcomers, Mrs. Moore and Ms. Quested, arrive in India; it is more clearly heard as their relationship with India gains complexity. The influence of the colonizers and the colonized on one another is inevitable; however, the usual assumption is that the colonists are the most successful in imposing their values and ideologies on the individua...   [tags: Passage to India Essays]

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Public School Mentality in Howards End and Passage to India

- Public School Mentality in Howard's End and Passage to India The public-school system remains unique because it was created by the Anglo-Saxon middle classes - how perfectly it expresses their character - with its boarding houses, its compulsory games, its system of prefects and fagging, its insistence on good form and on esprit de corps - (E.M. Forster, 'Notes on the English Character', 1936.) Forster perceived the public-school system to be at the centre of the English middle-classes, defining their set of core values and moulding their behaviour....   [tags: Education End Passage India Papers]

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Analysis of A Passage to India by E. M. Forster

- Analysis of A Passage to India by Forster Forster's novel A Passage to India portrays a colonial India under British rule, before its liberation. For convenience's sake, Western civilization has created an Other as counterpart to itself, and a set of characteristics to go with it. An "us versus them" attitude is exemplified in Forster's representation of The Other. Separation of the British and the Indian exists along cultural lines, specifically religious/spiritual differences. Savage or ungodly cultures were to be assimilated into or at the least governed by Christians, and converted....   [tags: passage india forster essays papers]

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Metropolitan vs. Colonial Space in Forster’s A Passage to India and Lawrence’s Women in Love

- Metropolitan vs. Colonial Space in Forster’s A Passage to India and Lawrence’s Women in Love       At first glance, it seems easy to state a definitive distinction between what Said calls “metropolitan space” and “colonial space.” In its simplest form, metropolitan space is the space occupied by the colonizers. Examples of this include England, France and the places these people reside in while living in these colonies. Likewise, colonial space is that which is occupied by those who are colonized....   [tags: Passage India]

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A Passage to India

- E.M. Forster, born into a middle-class family in London, was a humanist and an English writer famous for his literary works which called attention to the hypocrisy (present in the time in which he lived). In his novel A Passage To India, Forster explores the relationship between and within the Anglo-Indian and Native-Indian communities under British Imperialism and expounds on the sins which its members commit against the humanistic values of sympathy and understanding. Additionally, in A Passage to India Forster reflects the relationship phases which occur between his characters through the use of the three main divisions -- Mosque, Caves, and Temple....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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A Passage to India

- There are people bustling, merchants selling, Anglo-Indians watching, and birds flying overhead. How many perspectives are there in this one snippet of life. They are uncountable, and that is the reality. Modernist writers strive to emulate this type of reality into their own work as well. In such novels, there is a tendency to lack a chronological or even logical narrative and there are also frequent breaks in narratives where the perspectives jump from one to another without warning. Because there are many points of view and not all of them are explained, therefore, modernist novels often tend to have narrative perspectives that suddenly shift or cause confusion....   [tags: Literary Analysis, E. M. Forster]

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A Passage to India and Burmese Days

- ... Religion also facilitates the idea that, especially through Hinduism, everything can be united in love. In a way, this is similar to the idea of liberal humanism in which, if everyone is treated as an individual and approached with intelligence and goodwill, even those with differences can become friends. With religion, it seems as though, even though Aziz and Mrs. Moore come from very different backgrounds, they could be friends because, as Mrs. Moore tells her son Ronny, “God has put us on the earth in order to be pleasant to each other....   [tags: colonial issues, EM Forster, George Orwell]

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Analysis of the Film Passage of India

- “A Passage to India” is a film released in 1984; however, the film was set in the 1920s. The film shows India under the British Raj during a time of animosity and the Indians’ anti-imperialist attitude. Furthermore, the film displays themes of prejudice and India on its journey of becoming its own independent nation. “A Passage to India” has a powerful message of the racism in India during the time of the British Raj and the message shines through vivid imagery and a thrilling plot. A short synopsis of the film is two educated British women travel by boat to India....   [tags: racism, prejudice, independent]

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A Passage to India by Forster

- Today, for the most part, women are seen as equal to men. Women are given the same opportunities as men and an equal chance at getting a job as men. In today’s society, women do not just have one role and that role and that being to have kids, but they can pursue any career they wish. However, it was not always this way. According to feminist theorists, western civilizations were patriarchal which means that the society is dominated by males. The society is set up so that the male is above the female in all cultural aspects including family, religion, politics, economics, art, and the social and legal realms....   [tags: Gender Roles, Equality, Novel Analysis]

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E.M Forster’s novel A Passage to India

- Leonard Woolf considers E.M Forster’s novel A Passage to India to be a representation of ‘’the real life of politics in India, the intricacy of personal relations, the story itself, the muddle and the mystery of life’’ (Jay, 1998). Fosters novel has been the subject of literary criticism from many angles given the highly controversial subject matter which is called into question as to whether it is a genuine representation of India under colonisation written from an objective experience, and whether this attempt to represent India is successful or a failure....   [tags: India Representation, Literary Analysis, Novel]

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A Passage To India

- A Passage to India A Passage to India entails various social criticisms and political matters that are among the human race. The setting of the story takes place in India where the British have colonized the city of Chandrapore. The British had no respect for the native culture and race that inhabit this region even thought they were the original inhabitants. Miss Quested and Mrs. Moore begin their passage to India in order to attend the marriage of Miss Quested. Miss Quested plans on being united in marriage with Mrs....   [tags: essays research papers]

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A passage to india

- E.M. Forster's A Passage to India concerns the relations between the English and the native population of India during the colonial period in which Britain ruled India. The novel takes place primarily in Chandrapore, a city along the Ganges River notable only for the nearby Marabar caves. The main character of the novel is Dr. Aziz, a Moslem doctor in Chandrapore and widower. After he is summoned to the Civil Surgeon's home only to be promptly ignored, Aziz visits a local Islamic temple where he meets Mrs....   [tags: essays research papers]

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A Passage to India by E. M. Forster

- When reading the novel A Passage to India or watching the film of the same name, the characters a reader or viewer remembers are Aziz, Adela, Ronny, Mrs. Moore, and many more. There is one character within the story that fails to receive the credit that is due to her: India herself. Throughout the entire novel, E. M. Forster provides thoughts and words for India, though she cannot truly speak. David Lean also attempts to create a separate persona for India in his film. The two of them, in their unique ways, managed to create an extra character with its own personality and motivations....   [tags: Aziz, Adela, Ronny, Mrs. Moore, ]

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The Role of Abuse in British India in Forster's Passage to India

- In a Passage to India the author, E. M Forster sends the message of India’s mistreatment and misrepresentation by Britain. Throughout the novel, the reader is able to observe how British and Indian characters are treated differently. The author demonstrates the British perspective of Indians being the ignorant characters in the novel, whose company leads to troubles. Another aspect of the British perspective is that Indians are being treated as inferiors to the British in their own country, because if it were not for the British, the social and political order in India will descend into chaos....   [tags: Critical Analysis]

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Animal Motifs in A Passage To India

- The recurring animal motifs in A Passage To India suggest a harmonious life existing outside of the contrasting state of humanity. While tensions escalate among the English and Indians, peace presides in the animal kingdom. Perhaps the only characters outside of the animals who acknowledge this peace are Mrs. Moore and Professor Godbole who specifically identify with a wasp extending their voluntary cognizance to Indian culture and the understanding of unity among all living creatures on Earth....   [tags: essays research papers]

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A Passage to India by E.M. Forster

- A Passage to India by E.M. Forster In E.M. Forster's novel A Passage to India, characters often seem grouped into one of two opposing camps: Anglo-Indian or native Indian. All the traditional stereotypes apply, and the reader is hard pressed to separate the character from his or her racial and ethnic background. Without his "Britishness", for instance, Ronny disappears. However, a few characters are developed to the point that they transcend these categories, and must be viewed as people in their own right....   [tags: Papers]

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A Passage to India and Orientalism

- A Passage to India and Orientalism When in 1978 Edward W. Said published his book Orientalism, it presented a turning point in post-colonial criticism. He introduced the term Orientalism, and talked about 2 of its aspects: the way the West sees the Orient and the way the West controls the Orient. Said gave three definitions of Orientalism, and it is through these definitions that I will try to demonstrate how A Passage to India by E....   [tags: European Literature Edward W. Said E. M. Forster]

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Gender Bias in the 1920’s as Portrayed in "A Passage to India"

- Today, for the most part, women are seen as equal to men. Women are given the same opportunities as men, and an equal chance at getting a job. In today’s society, women no longer have one role, which is to have kids and raise them, but they can pursue any career they wish. However, it was not always this way. According to feminist theorists, western civilizations were patriarchal, meaning they were dominated by males. Society was set up so the male was above the female in all cultural aspects, including family, religion, politics, economics, art, and the social and legal realms....   [tags: Literary Themes]

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Comparing Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's Heat and Dust and Forster's A Passage to India

- Comparing Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's Heat and Dust and Forster's A Passage to India Literature throughout time has contained many similarities. These similarities become even more prevalent when authors share a similar style and inspirations. Two authors that have similar experiences are Ruth Prawer Jhabvala and E.M. Forster. Both these authors have written books that are in the modernism style. Jhabvala and Forster also were fascinated by India and choose the relationships between native Indians and English colonizers as one of their themes....   [tags: Comopare Contrast Dust Passage Essays]

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The Power of Heart of Darkness and A Passage to India

- The Power of Heart of Darkness and A Passage to India       John A. McClure writes in Kipling and Conrad that "as the twentieth century opened, the artists and intellectuals of the age increasingly came to believe that imperial rule, if inevitable in the short run, was an inglorious enterprise that deformed both those who ruled and those who submitted" (153). Joseph Conrad and E. M. Forster were among these artists and each expressed their misgivings about the "inglorious enterprise" and its "deforming" effects in Heart of Darkness and A Passage to India respectively....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]

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jane eyre, a passage to india , and the tempest

- Jane Eyre, A passage to India, and The Tempest all hold within their covers’ stories of women or girls who knowingly and unknowingly affected the lives of men they were involved with. However, the females’ range of influence does vary between the books due the writer’s opinions of the female sex. The strength and influence of women did and will continue to have an affect on the men they are surrounded by as well as our society as a whole. Jane Eyre begins as a young, weak girl and buds into a strong, independent woman....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Trip to the Marabar Caves in A Passage to India

- The Trip to the Marabar Caves in A Passage to India The term relationship is defined as a state of connectedness between people and most especially an emotional connection. Within chapters 12-16 it can be identified that there simply is no existence of relationship between Aziz and his guests whilst on the trip to the Marabar Caves. This is shown especially when on of Aziz's servants is preparing the tea and the ungrateful response that response that Mrs Moore makes. This is identified by "A strange place to make tea in"....   [tags: Papers]

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A Passage Of India Begins And Ends By Posing The Context Of British Colonialism

- ... “You understand me, you know what others feel. Oh, if others resembled you. Rather surprised, she replied: ‘I don 't think I understand people very well. I only know whether I like or dislike them’”(Forster 52). At the beginning of the novel, Aziz is scornful of the English, wishing only to consider them comically or ignore them completely. Yet the intuitive connection Aziz feels with Mrs. Moore in the mosque opens him to the possibility of friendship with Fielding. Through the first half of the novel, Fielding and Aziz represent a positive model of liberal humanism....   [tags: Friendship, Interpersonal relationship]

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Rider Haggard’s King Solomon’s Mines and Forester’s A Passage to India

- Rider Haggard’s King Solomon’s Mines and Forester’s A Passage to India In British imperial fiction, physical setting or landscape commonly plays a prominent role in the central thematic subject. In these works, landscape goes beyond an objective description of nature and setting to represent “a way of seeing- a way in which some Europeans have represented to themselves and others the world about them and their relationships with it, and through which they have commented on social relations” (Cosgrove xiv)....   [tags: Haggard Solomon's Forester Passage Essays]

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E M Forster and the British Raj in a Passage to India

- The early years of the twentieth century saw the rise of the novel as a popular genre in the literature of the war-struck Edwardian England. Novelists like Joseph Conrad, E.M.Forster, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and D.H. Lawrence gave the form new dimensions. Among these writers E.M. Forster made a mark in the literature of his age through his last novel A Passage to India (1924), which was entirely different from Forster's other novels in that it dealt with the political occupation of India by the British, a colonial domination that ended soon after the publication of this novel....   [tags: European Literature]

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A Passage to India:An Examination of the Work in a Historical Context

- A Passage to India by Edward Morgan Forster is truly one of the great books of it’s time. Written in an era when the world was more romantic, yet substantially less civil to the unwestern world than it is today; E. M. Forster opened the eyes of his fellow countrymen and the world by showing them the truth about British Colonialism. The novel aids greatly in the ability to interpret events of the time as well as understand the differences between the social discourse of then and now. To fully understand A Passage to India and its cultural and historical significance one must first understand the world in which it was written, and the man who wrote it....   [tags: essays research papers]

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"A Passage to India" by E. M. Forster is Not a Political Novel

- Yes, I agree with EM Forster that A Passage to India is not a political novel. Instead, it explores the vastness of infinity and seems (at first) to portray nothing. In those two words alone, `infinity', and `nothing', is the allusion of wondering, and wandering spirits. The title, A Passage to India, evokes a sense of journey and destination. When we string these two ideas together the novel begins to reveal itself as a garland worn in humble tribute to India. With this garland around his neck, Forster also pays homage to the Shri Krishna consciuousness as expressed through the Hindu religion....   [tags: World Literature]

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Colonialism and Imperialism in Heart of Darkness and A Passage to India

- It is best to analyze the works, Heart of Darkness and A Passage to India, applying the historical and cultural conditions of the society in which they were produced. The relations between groups and classes of people that imperialism sets up, and that these two works explore, starkly reveals the contradictions within capitalism in a way that a similar piece of fiction set within one culture and dealing with characters from that culture alone cannot. Prior to the analysis however, I would like to give a brief, pertinent explanation of the Marxist approach to the analysis of literature and of the terms I will be using....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Comparing the Impact of Colonization in A Small Place, A Passage to India, and Robinson Crusoe

- Impact of British Colonization Exposed in A Small Place, A Passage to India, and Robinson Crusoe British colonialism began in the early fifteen hundreds and even continues today with the British rule of the British Virgin Islands.  For centuries, literature has served as a type of historical documentation of colonization as many authors wrote about colonization from both a colonized and a colonizer's point of view. During colonization, and post-colonization, the physical environment of each colony was changed....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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A Comparison of The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot, Passage to India by E.M. Foster, and When We Were Orphans by Kazuo Ishiguro

- A Comparison of The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot, Passage to India by E.M. Foster, and When We Were Orphans by Kazuo Ishiguro The three extracts I have chosen are all written in a relatively similar style, I am rather partial to this style, ergo the motive for choosing them. This will however, make contrasting them a little harder, however I believe that the consequent refined subtleties will provide a more interesting essay. Let us hope so. To provide a suitable structure from which to analyse less obvious comparisons, something of the author's contextual intentions must be made apparent....   [tags: Papers]

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Comparing Relationships in E. M. Forster’s A Passage to India and Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthou

- Comparing Relationships in E. M. Forster’s A Passage to India and Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse E. M. Forster’s A Passage to India and Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse are concerned with the lack of intimacy in relationships. Forster’s novel is set in English-run India, the difference between race and culture being the center of disharmony. Woolf’s novel is set in a family’s summer house, the difference between genders being the center of disharmony. Despite this difference of scale, the disharmonies are much the same....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]

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A Passage of Muddles

- Intercultural communication is prone to misunderstandings and confusion, or put simply, muddle-prone. While common cultural miscommunications are often minor offences, some have far more detrimental consequences. In E.M. Forster’s novel A Passage to India, conflict results with the collision of two cultures in the British-Indian city of Chandrapore, which is plagued by racial, class and religious tension amongst Anglo and Native Indians. The novel chronicles the attempted intercultural friendships of Dr....   [tags: Communication ]

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Retail In India -Revolution Or Evolution

- Executive Summary Graphics Not Available Retailing in India came with evolutionary patterns from Kirana store to Super market. This sector was un-organized in the initial stage, and after that it carried forward by the textiles industries through the dealer model. Now it is growing as supermarket and hypermarket. The main drivers of the retail evolution in India are buying behavior of the customer, increase in disposable income of middle class, infrastructure development and changing customer choice....   [tags: India Retail Business]

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Pre Independence India And The Indian National Congress

- ... Efforts continued onward, becoming increasingly tense and violent, until the late 1950s. First off, colonies are expensive. With a country such as India which became the debtor instead of the ones in debt following WWII, far off from the mainland, etc. This led to the independence of the subcontinent, but it partitioned in a peaceful manner. They were divided by the British rule beforehand, and kept a secret until India’s independence. While things stayed calm for a short time, later on there was a large separation from Hindu to Muslim and vice versa in terms of fleeing persecution by the other....   [tags: British Empire, British Raj, India, Poverty]

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Explain how the themes and issues were communicated in a passage to

- Explain how the themes and issues were communicated in a passage to India. The passage to India has many themes and issues throughout the play. When you enter the theatre the characters have already started to act, there are Indians seated in the left corner on a raised part of the stage playing music. The music is made by tradition Indian drums and a violin, to contrast the two cultures. The music gives an Indian experience. I think the music tried to show the influence that the English culture had over the Indians, as the Indians were playing a violin in there own country....   [tags: English Literature]

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The United Kingdom and India: A Study of Gender and Economic/Regional Cleavages

- The United Kingdom and India: A Study of Gender and Economic/Regional Cleavages Introduction The United Kingdom, a former world power and colonizing empire, and India, the second most populous country in the world and former colony of the United Kingdom, share a bond of democracy. The United Kingdom is a constitutional monarchy with a Parliament consisting of the House of Commons and the House of Lords. Similarly, India is a federal state also with a parliamentary form of government. Despite these similar political systems, studies of the individual histories, economies, and political cultures of each country reveal cleavages within each society affecting aspects of the governments such...   [tags: India England Government Politics Essays]

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Cultural Interactions between the British and the Native Characters

- In the novel, A passage to India, Forster tries to bring to light the cultural interactions between the native Indians and their colonialists the British. It considers if there may be a possibility of personal relationships between the natives the British so as to develop a mutual satisfaction. In this novel he, tries to consider if the natives can be able to connect with the British, and vice versa (Forster, 1979: 26). The novel explores the Anglo-Indian friendship, paying attention to describing the two societies that are to be found there; natives and the British....   [tags: pasage to india, forster]

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Colonial Representations of India in Prose Fiction

- Colonial Representations of India in Prose Fiction As in representations of the other British colonies, India was used by colonial novelists as a tool of displacement of the individual and re-affirmation of the metropolitan whole. There are three methods by which this effect is achieved. The first method displays an unqualified reliance on a culture too remote to be approached except physically: a hero or protagonist in a pre-mutiny novel is at liberty to escape to India at a moment of crisis, rearrange his life to his advantage and return to a happy ending and the establishment of a newly defined metropolitan life....   [tags: Essays Papers]

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Software Patent and Copyright Laws in India

- Software Patent and Copyright Laws in India This Midterm Paper investigates the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR), primarily Copyrights and Patents in India. The Paper performs a Legal as well as Ethical Analysis of the Indian IPR Laws. It recommends improvements; especially regarding Global Issues related to Software Patents and IPR over the Net by substantiating evidence from the Embassy of India Policy Statements and from a reputed magazine in India, called India Today. The author fully acknowledges citations from all the references....   [tags: Technology Computers Essays]

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The Politics of Policy Implementation in India

- The majority of policy studies assume that, once a policy has been formulated, it will be implemented. This is not unreasonable, after all. The scholars who analyze policies and build models of the policy processes do base their work on the assumption that the policy will be implemented, exactly as it is. Furthermore, this assumption extends to another: that the desired results of the policy will be close, at least, to those expected by the policy makers. It should be noted that this assumption is shared by many common citizens....   [tags: anti-corruption agencies in developing nations]

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The Managerial and Social Hierarchy of India

- Our world is diverse: peoples of different countries and even different parts of the same country have different mind-sets. Indian society is group-oriented, that means the interests of a society are more important than the interests of an individual. Although these days people become more and more individualistic, especially in megalopolises, even know we can see the cases when a father kills his daughter under the pressure of local society ("to protect the family and village honour"). There are several reasons for group-oriented way of thinking, which defines the managerial culture in India....   [tags: culture, company, connections]

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The Stigma Amongst The Hijras of India

- The book “Neither Man nor Women” is an ethnography about the Hijras of India published in 1990. Serena Nanda, author of the book, is a professor of Anthropology in City University of New York. When beginning her fieldwork in the study of the Hijras, she only had brief information about the Hijras since there was not much written about them before. Nanda knew she would encounter conflict in communicating with the Indian community and that she would need translators. In the city she settled in, Bastipore, which is located in south central India, there were three spoken languages....   [tags: indian community,etnography,serena nanda]

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Holiest Sanctuaries of India: Ghrishneshwar Sanctuary

- Ghrishneshwar Sanctuary, Ghrishneshwar, Maharashtra About Ghrishneshwar Sanctuary The Grishneshwar Jyotirlinga Sanctuary is one of the aged and holiest sanctuaries of India. An old pioneer terminus, Grishneshwar is famously known as the habitation one of the 12 Jyotirlingas of Shiva. This journey site is placed at a town called Verul which lies at a separation of 11 km from Daulatabad and 30 kms from Aurangabad. It lies at a nearby closeness to the Ellora holes. Being the habitation one of the holiest and antiquated sanctuaries known by the name of Grishneshwar Jyotirlinga sanctuary, the ubiquity of Grishneshwar might be determined....   [tags: carvings and engaging models]

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Why China Can Attract More FDI: A Response to "Competitiveness in India and China: the FDI puzzle"

- ... Secondly, Prime, Subrahmanyam and Lin (2011) proved the related and supporting industries, the role of government and institutions, and the “chance factor”: timing and location are close related to the FDI flows (pp. 320-328). This relationship was the results of this research paper. Last but not least, Prime, Subrahmanyam and Lin (2011) concluded their research covered crucial conditions of the Porter’s diamond theory to analyze this issue, but the conditions lacked ample data and examples to support the results (p....   [tags: foreign direct investment]

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Solutions to Improve Relations Between Pakistan and India

- Soon after the partition, relations between India and Pakistan were strained over the Kashmir issue and since then both the nations have fought three wars and entered into various disputes. It has been argued by analysts that the core issue of Kashmir is the main obstacle between smooth India-Pakistan relations. However, after a deep examination of this notion, it can be concluded there are other key issues between both the rivals which hinders healthy relations between them. These conflicts can be categorized as the water issue, terrorism and the efforts for greater influence in Afghanistan....   [tags: Terrorism, Mistrust, Government]

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The Hoysaleswara Sanctuary in Hassan District, Karnataka India

- About Hoysaleswara Sanctuary The Hoysaleswara sanctuary is devoted to Ruler Shiva, who is the destroyer of the Universe according to Hinduism. This sanctuary was manufactured throughout the twelfth century and the Hoysala Ruler Vishnuvardhana constructed it. Throughout the fourteenth century the Muslims attacked Halebidu and plundered its wealth and riches. The sanctuary was leveled and dismissed by the rulers. Hoysaleswara was additionally alluded to as Dwarasamudra or Dorasamudra. The separation from Belur to Halebidu is about 16 kilometers; Hassan to Halebidu is something like 31 kilometers....   [tags: shiva, hinduism]

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Partition Literature of India

- The Partition of India "A moment comes, which comes but rarely in history, when we step out from the old to the new, when an age ends, and when the soul of a nation, long suppressed, finds utterance." -Jawarhalal Nehru 14 August, 1947, saw the birth of the new Islamic Republic of Pakistan. At midnight the next day India won its freedom from colonial rule, ending nearly 350 years of British presence in India. During the struggle for freedom, Gandhi had written an appeal "To Every Briton" to free their possessions in Asia and Africa, especially India (Philips and Wainwright, 567)....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Injectable Drug Abuse

- MEMORANDUM INJECTABLE DRUG ABUSE: GROWING CHALLENGE IN NORTH-EASTERN PART OF INDIA FROM: AE28697 TO: Ministry of development of north east affairs, India RE: Scenario C-Health and harm reduction DATE: 19 October 2013 Introduction North-east (NE) India is connected to remaining part of India through a constricted passage known as Siliguri Corridor squeezed between Nepal and Bangladesh (Hussain, 2011). It comprises of seven sister states of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura....   [tags: growing challenge, India, drug abuse]

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Impacts Of Family Traditions And Religion In India

- Impacts of Family Traditions and Religion in India Family traditions and religion greatly impact the lives of many people in India. These elements of culture are reasons that form the way that Indians lead their lives. Both factors make up what type of person that individual will become. That is the reason why religion and family traditions are so valued in Indian society. Religion is probably the most definitive factor in the way that an Indian will lead his life, particularly if they practice Hinduism....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Hindu Devotees and The Ramanathaswamy Temple

- Rameswarambooming economy is through tourism,trades and services. It is also well known for its economy though other Industries such as fishing Industry and Handicraft goods. Tourism as backbone of Economy: Rameswaram attracts wide range of tourists from pilgrim visitors to water sports, from architecture to beaches.It attracts tourism from all over the world by its heritage historic temples, beautiful beaches, splendid architecture and magnificent sculptures in the temple, Pamban Rail, water sports and for its beautiful island known for its many ancient mythological beliefs....   [tags: india, tourism, shopping]

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Traditional Bridal Dowry Box as a Social Evil in Indian Society

- ... There is no doubt that Roy cleverly uses diction and flow in order to more clearly depict to the reader her vision of dowry- as an old-fashioned concept , as a social evil of India and to show her idea of progress in Indian society regarding the vision of not having a dowry in these two different generations of women. It is notable when describing Ammu’s early life Roy decides to use short, choppy sentences in order to suggest the carelessness of Ammu’s decision-making as she desperately would do anything to get away from her family....   [tags: mocking India's social evil and arranged marriages]

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Indian Hero : The Light Of Kalidasa 's Sakuntala

- Indian Hero Culture in the Light of Kalidasa’s Sakuntala How a society defines a hero is dictated by the present and prevailing culture and mentality. And culture, in turn, is shaped by changes in the community – politics, the media, science and technology, etc. A person considered as a hero for fighting and killing thousands of invaders centuries ago, may not be considered as a hero if he fought and killed Muslims in the present day claiming to uphold Hindu dignity. An interesting example of this change in hero culture is the prevailing perception of Indians is regarding Gandhi....   [tags: India, Mumbai, Time, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi]

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Gandhi's Beliefs and Movements

- History of Mohandas Gandhi's Beliefs and Movements Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was one of the leading spiritual, political, moral, and cultural leaders of the 1900's. He helped free India from British control by using a unique method of nonviolent resistance. Gandhi is honored by the people of India, as the father of their nation. He was slight in build, but had great physical and moral strength. He was assassinated, by an Indian, who resented his program of tolerance for all creeds and religions....   [tags: Mohandas Gandhi Nonviolence India Essays]

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Canadian Sovereignty over the Northwest Passage

- A complex collection of more than 1800 separate islands forms the Canadian Archipelago and Canada’s Arctic territory. 1 Within recent history the arctic has gained popular attention from governments both domestically and internationally. The rise in global climate temperatures accounts for longer, ice free Arctic summers, higher levels of resource exploration and development, and less challenges to access in the Arctic. Canadian sovereignty over Arctic lands and islands is undisputed with the single exception of Hans Island, a 1.3 square kilometer island claimed by Denmark.2 Currently what is disputed is the Canadian assertion of sovereignty over the Northwest Passage waterway....   [tags: Canada, Northwest Passage]

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INDIA: THE BEST FOREIGN MARKET

- INTRODUCTION When determining if a foreign country is a good market to expand into, many factors will help choose which market is best. These factors include Culture, Politics and Law, the Current National Economy, Market Size and Demand, Human Resources, and Financial Resources and Profitability. The factors listed above are not all-inclusive, but give a well-defined checklist to compare other markets. These factors will be discussed and prove that India is a great market to expand into for Business Processing Outsourcing (BPO) services....   [tags: India]

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Construction of Public Sapces in India

- With the rise of British colonization of South Asia in mid-late 18 century came western ideas of the “public”, contextualized in spatial, social and political terms. The later construction of “public” spaces during mid-late 19th century, like parks, evidences that overtime the municipalities, consisting of both Indian and European officials, attempted to alter the landscape of the major cities in an effort to replicate the sociopolitical environment of the western world. However, although, as Sudipta Kaviraj argues, notions of the common or collective identity readily existed in India, adoption of a socio-politically defined “public” sphere proved to be difficult precisely because the ideas...   [tags: India]

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The Generation Gap In India

- As time goes on a gap is created between the past generations and the current generations. This gap between men in the 1950s and the men now (2009) are similar and different in terms of the roles they play, their attitudes towards society, women and work, and their identities. The root to the generation gap in India is due to the influence of media especially television and movies have caused people to look up to the characters and strives to act like them, which reinforce gender stereotypes and identities....   [tags: India]

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Rite of Passage

- "…He posited ‘things’ as possessing being…No wonder he later always discovered in things only that which he had put into them!" – Nietzsche The Rites of passage are classically viewed as the method by which age-superior members of the society transmit new and powerful knowledge to the young as part of the initiation into a new state of being. Some initiations involve a tangible progression, from one occupation or status group to another. Other initiations are passages of an intangible nature, involving the acquisition of metaphysical knowledge and abilities....   [tags: Rites-of-passage]

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India's Economic History

- Indian civilization traces its early origins back to the Harappan civilization in the 3rd millennium BC, had acquired a definite mould by the early centuries of the Christian era. During this period, India had not only developed a unique social order and philosophy of life, but also a set of political norms which in turn shaped its world view (Cox, 1997: pp124). The concept of religious tolerance, for example has been a leit motif throughout Indian history including the period of Turkish rule between the 13th and 8th centuries (pp125)....   [tags: India]

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India Needs Socialism

- The Indian economy is an interesting thing on one side we see Middle aged men in Imported Cars , Tall buildings with luxury apartments , five star hotels and clubs full of people spending thousands and posh luxury office’s It feels like money just spills out of the pockets of the rich to make this capitalist utopia of the few . We also see slums , factories with horrible workings conditions , Beggars and rag pickers on the roads living on less than the bare minimum needed to survive .When I was 12 years old I saw a women feeding her child of a trash can and in my hand was a burger from a fancy American fast food joint ....   [tags: India]

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India 's Development Of India

- ... Nehru viewed modernity as a positive force for India as a whole and argued that a village based society was economically stagnant. In addition, Nehru was critical of traditional methods of farming, deeming them outdated. He valued the use of modern technological in agricultural practices. Nehru’s political ideals ultimately played an important role in shaping the development trajectory of the nation through policies and programmes. Lastly, Ambedkar was a dalit and came to represent the lower castes in Indian society through his political positions....   [tags: India, Indian National Congress, Jawaharlal Nehru]

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How the Technological Advancements of the Moguhal Empire Helped Shape India

- The Moguhal Empire was an empire which had many advancements which progressed in the development of India. The Moguhal Empire which is also known as the Mogul Empire had the largest influence over India and Pakistan from the sixteenth to seventeenth century (Richards, 1996) . The introduction of the Moguls to India's subcontinent was led by a man named Babur. Babur learned that India had wealth from his ancestor before him, Timur. Babur invaded India and eliminated the Sultan of power, Ibrahim Shah Lodi in 1526 (1996)....   [tags: India]

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Hindu India vs Muslim India

- At first, the aim of the Muslim League was to establish friendly relations between the Muslims and the British Crown. After the Royal decision of the annulment of the partition of Bengal in 1911, Muslim League saw that in order to get their requests dealt with, they need to form relations with the Congress, the representative party of Hindus. Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the member of Congress, also joined the Muslim League in 1913. After witnessing the annulment, he worked on a pact to unite Muslims and Hindus which was eventually signed on 30th of December, 1916 at Lucknow....   [tags: Hindu vs Muslim in India]

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Indi India And India

- ... While trade was beneficial to both Great Britain and India, it was the British who gained the most and the Indian people who suffered the most. Events such as the First Indian War of Independence of 1857 were the culmination of the neglect and ignorance the EIC and the British had been guilty to. The EIC had no concern for the well-being of the native population in regards to their customs, health, and ability to determine their own path. The EIC who only had interests in exploiting India for its own benefit was not fit to govern a people who did not even understand the concept of unity in any form until they came along....   [tags: British Empire, United Kingdom, East India Company]

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india reborn

- In India’s huge and booming economy there are a lot of ways that you can go from being an untouchable to being one of the richest people there. The key for India is to become a model for the world is through education and it also helps that it is the worlds largest democracy. There are three different classes in India the upper class, the middle class which is the largest of the world, and the untouchables and they are all trying to help and make India a better place. The upper class in India is doing many different things to try and make India a better place....   [tags: india]

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India, the World Bank, and the IMF

- Throughout the short history of an independent India, they have relied upon loans to grow their economy. Due to their prior colonization by Great Britain, they received most of their economy from Britain and there was no true need to receive loans. Since the independence of India from its mother- country, India has strongly relied upon the IMF and World Bank to grow its economy to the booming status that it has today. Until the middle of the 20th century, British investment and trade that was introduced by the British fueled India’s economy....   [tags: The Economy India]

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The Microcredit Foundation of India and Poverty in India

- The Microcredit Foundation of India is a non- profit organization, and effective tool for alleviating poverty. The Microcredit Foundation has its base located in southern rural India. Microcredit works with just about everyone who needs their help; however their focus is women. Microcredit presents the women of rural communities with the opportunity to start a business. The services of micro credit are dedicated to creating a better stable economy, opportunities in the establishment of medium sized enterprises, and co-operative development....   [tags: nonprofits, Microcredit Foundation of India, pover]

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India 's India

- ... I found this festival significant for three main reasons. First, there are millions of people that attend this festival; safety seems to be a concern of mine. Secondly, men and women put their bodies in harmful scenarios to show their devotion to the Hindu gods and goddesses. Lastly, I believe that some of the activities are outrageous for a public festival; however they can be educational too. At the Kumbh Mela festival, there are thirty million people and this number is growing. I strongly believe that human safety is a concern when there are that many individuals in a limited area....   [tags: India, Holi, Kumbh Mela, Festival]

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1069 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

Myself in India, by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

- Ruth Prawer Jhabvala was born in Germany but she moved to England at the age of 12. She then moved to India in the fifties, where she married and settle for the better part of her life. The essay is “Myself in India” is based on her experiences there. Jhabvala refers to India as an animal four times in the essay. We first come across it when she is describing India “...but there is no point in making a catalogue of the horrors with which one lives, on which one lives, as on the back of an animal “....   [tags: Myself in India]

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Success in My First Visit to India

- My first visit to India over the summer was a rewarding experience. Most people don’t have the chance to visit a foreign country and see their culture, but I got that chance. I had the opportunity to visit all my relatives for the first time and learning more about my culture and heritage. The atmosphere was nothing compared to the United States and the tradition was very festive. The people, the food, the culture and traditions are what I miss the most. All of those things are what made my two weeks a great experience....   [tags: India, travel, ]

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The Effects of British Imperialism in India

- The Effects of British Imperialism in India One could approach this topic from two points of view; the British and the Indian. One could choose either party and find very different opinions. When British colonizers first arrived in India, they slowly gained more and more control in India through many ways, the most prominent being trade and commerce. At first, they managed India’s government by pulling the string behind the curtain. However, soon they had acquired complete rule over India, converting it into a true British colony....   [tags: Politics, India, British]

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Development in India: A Reality Check

- At the dawn of history, India started on her unending quest, and trackless centuries are filled with her striving and the grandeur of her successes, and her failures. Through good and ill fortune alike, she has never lost sight of that quest or forgotten the ideals which gave her strength. We end today a period of ill fortune and India discovers herself again. The achievement we celebrate today is but a step, an opening of opportunity, to the greater triumphs and achievements that await us. Are we brave enough and wise enough to grasp this opportunity and accept the challenge of the future....   [tags: literacy rate, india's struggle]

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