The Scientific Revolution Of The 20th Century Essay example

The Scientific Revolution Of The 20th Century Essay example

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As Europe began to move out of the Renaissance, it brought with it many of the beliefs of that era. The continent now carried a questioning spirit and was eager for more to study and learn. Throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, many discoveries were made in subjects all across the realm of science, but it was the doubting and testing of old traditions and authorities that truly made this time into a revolution. The Scientific Revolution challenged the authority of the past by changing the view of nature from a mysterious entity to a study of mathematics, looking to scientific research instead of the Church, and teaching that there was much knowledge of science left to be discovered.
The Scientific Revolution in Europe moved from the older methods of science to the study of nature through mathematics and general rules. Scientists before the Revolution mostly viewed nature as a mysterious force which was vulnerable at all times to random happenings caused by a divine being. However, the work of several scientists during this time proved that nature was governed by rules, which could be understood by mathematics. Using only his understanding of math and the data already discovered, Copernicus was able to refute the Ptolemaic model of the universe and produce mathematical theories of the earth 's movement, which were reaffirmed by Kepler. Sir Isaac Newton 's laws of motion and gravity provided a mathematical way to describe and predict the motion of objects both on earth and in space. This change in view and challenge to old views on science was so dramatic, it even affected the world of common thought. The new philosophy of 'mechanism ' emerged, which viewed the world as a machine.
The Scientific Revolution turned away...


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...of Discovery and the following Scientific Revolution, however, this old authority was all but destroyed. The 'new world ' of the Americas and Australia were first found and studied during this time, filling Europe with knowledge of new plants, animals, and people groups. Some of the greatest amounts of new knowledge, though, came not from the ocean, but from the sky. The newly invented telescope, first made by Galileo, opened up a vast sea of never-before-seen information about the planets, their surfaces, and their movements. By proving that nature still had abundant information to be discovered, the Scientific Revolution went against the old Scholastic authority.
The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were a time of great change in the minds of Europe. Staggering amounts of data were being gathered about astronomy, math, biology, chemistry, and many more subjects.

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