Schizophrenia, By Jim Stevens Essay

Schizophrenia, By Jim Stevens Essay

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“Schizophrenia is not a terribly common disease, but it can be a serious and chronic one. Worldwide about 1 percent of the population is diagnosed with schizophrenia, and approximately 1.2% of Americans (3.2 million) have the disorder” (Mentalhelp.net). The majority of society does not recognize what schizophrenia does to an individual and to their family. Using this context, in the poem Schizophrenia, the author, Jim Stevens utilizes the literary devices of imagery, symbolism, and personification to show how schizophrenia can rip a family apart; and can even go as far as to modify the atmosphere that the family lives in.
In poems, imagery is used to help get the writers’ message across in a language that is extremely visual. The poet wants to use words to create an image to help interpret the real meaning of the poem. In Schizophrenia imagery is shown as a main literary device by painting a picture of what is going on within the home and the person undergoing the mental disorder. Schizophrenia can even go as far as causing a person to have an unconcerned lack of hygiene. Jim Stevens uses imagery to help show how unhygienic this person has developed and what it has done to the atmosphere the family lives in, “Dishes slammed onto the table, / greasy stains spreading on the cloth” (Stevens 3-4), “Dishes were left unwashed, / the cloth disappeared under a hardened crust” (7-8). The family that lives in this house with the schizophrenic individual, is dealing with the mess that he or she has created. The way Jim Stevens writes it, he is presenting the person who usually cleans, is the individual with schizophrenia. The family doesn’t understand why he or she is not cleaning, but now they are having to do all the work in the household...


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...n they would apologize for what they had said. The couple then realized how schizophrenia was affecting their relationship and then the sobbing would happen. Schizophrenia changes a person’s personality, however, the house missed the fighting that was going on because the house felt that fighting is better than silence.
To conclude, Jim Stevens wants the reader to feel the marks that the family feels from the schizophrenia. In the poem Schizophrenia, the author utilizes imagery, symbolism, and personification to help the reader understand what the characters are going through with the mental disability or schizophrenia and how it will change the atmosphere in the household. Although schizophrenia is a not common disease, Jim Stevens composed a beautiful poem that if it is broken down well enough, the reader can understand just what schizophrenia will do to a family.

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