Essay on Sans Frontieres ' Hiv / Aids Outreach

Essay on Sans Frontieres ' Hiv / Aids Outreach

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Médecins Sans Frontières ' HIV/AIDS outreach
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University of the People

Médecins Sans Frontières (aka Doctors Without Borders) is an international NGO established in 1971 that is dedicated to providing humanitarian aid in emergency situations, globally. Their mission, as stated in their charter, is to “[provide] assistance to populations in distress, to victims of natural or man-made disasters, and to victims of armed conflict... irrespective of race, religion, creed, or political convictions.” (“Charter”, 2013). The creation of the MSF was a response to Max Recamier and Pascal Greletty-Bosviel 's experience working under the Red Cross in Biafra during the 1968 Nigerian civil war. They were appalled at the Red Cross 's apparent complacency during the Nigerian blockade that saw the starvation and murder of at least 1 million civilians over the course of 2.5 years (“Biafra: Thirty years on”, 2000). At the time of their creation the organization consisted of 300 volunteers, including doctors, nurses, journalists and other staff (“Founding of MSF”, 2013).

Since then, the organization has grown significantly, and as of 2014 employs more than 30,000 people world wide (“Founding of MSF”, 2013). This growth has enabled the MSF to tackle massive epidemics and provide critical humanitarian aid to over one hundred million patients since it 's inception. In it 's 40+ years of existence, the MSF has provided aid to Ebola patients, hurricane victims, refugees, et cetera in 70 countries. Possibly one of their greatest achievements to date is the progress they have made in diminishing the spread and effects of HIV/AIDS. Everyday 1000 children contract AIDS, with half of the infected infants dying before 2 years of age...


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...iversal Declaration of Human Rights | United Nations. (1948, December 10). Retrieved February 16, 2016, from http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html

HIV: Antiretroviral drugs fail to consistently reach patients in countries most affected by HIV/AIDS. (2015, November 30). Retrieved February 16, 2016, from http://www.msf.org/article/hiv-antiretroviral-drugs-fail-consistently-reach-patients-countries-most-affected-hivaids

There 's Still Time to Stop the TPP from Cutting Off the Critical Lifeline of Affordable Generic Medicines. (2016, February 10). Retrieved February 16, 2016, from http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/article/there’s-still-time-stop-tpp-cutting-critical-lifeline-affordable-generic-medicines

HIV/AIDS. (2015, October 16). Retrieved February 16, 2016, from http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/our-work/medical-issues/hivaids

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