Samuel Taylor Coleridge 's Poetry : Conversational Poems And Poems Of Imagination

Samuel Taylor Coleridge 's Poetry : Conversational Poems And Poems Of Imagination

Length: 963 words (2.8 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Exploring Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Poetry: Conversational Poems and Poems of Imagination

To say Samuel Taylor Coleridge is a brilliant and proficient poet would be an understatement. His creativity, imagination, and prose are beyond his time. His conversational poems contain elements of universality with a focus on nature and your place within the natural word. His poems of imagination on the other hand explore depths of creativity that are powerful and dream-like. For the purposes of this paper, I will argue that Coleridge’s conversational poems are superior to his poems of imagination. In order to explore this argument, I will analyze the importance of the poems. The two conversational poems I have selected are the following: “This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison” and “The Eolian Harp.” In order to prove my argument, I will discuss the conventions found within the poems of imagination and explain how they are not as fruitful. The two poems of imagination I have selected are, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” and “Christabel.”
To begin my argument, I will analyze the complexities and powerful themes at play within “Lime-Tree Bower” and display how universality is compelling and dynamic. Although the poem is conversational, imagination is one of the key elements within the poem. When Coleridge is unable to go on nature walk with his friends because of an injury, he imagines and envisions them out in nature:
“Now, my friends emerge/ Beneath the wide Heaven – and view again / The
many-steepled tract magnificent/ Of hilly fields and meadows, and the sea,”
even in his “prison,” he is able to see his friends perceiving nature (Coleridge lines 20-23).
Coleridge believes that his friend Charles in particular is enjoying nature becaus...


... middle of paper ...


...ry that explores the supernatural. The evil character Geraldine curses Christabel who is young and innocent. The text plays with the themes of good and evil and contains dark and wicked imagery. While both poems are innovative and entertaining, they do not give the same feelings and thoughts of appreciation for nature. The conversational poems universality is deeply embedded within the text and it reminds the reader to go out in nature, appreciate your surroundings, and to meditate on nature and your place in the world. The conversation poems are compelling because it evokes higher thought, and reminds you to look beyond yourself and focus on the peacefulness and serenity found in nature. The poems of imagination take of away from the naturalness of Coleridge’s writing which is why I believe that conversational poems remain purposeful and relevant in today’s society.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on The Genius That Failed By Samuel Taylor Coleridge

- Samuel Taylor Coleridge Samuel Taylor Coleridge has been referred to as “The Genius that Failed” (Poetry Foundation 1). Coleridge was raised in a post revolutionary time period in England, after the American and French Revolutions, known as the Romantic Age of Poetry. He is one of six commonly known poets largely responsible for the Romantic Movement that focused on choosing the rural life over living in the city and used nature as a bridge between man and God. Coleridge also played an instrumental part in the conversational poetry of his friend William Wordsworth and was known as a great philosopher and literary critic....   [tags: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth]

Better Essays
958 words (2.7 pages)

Samuel Taylor Coleridge: English Poet Essay

- ... During that period, Coleridge and Southey collaborated on a play titled The Fall of Robespierre in 1795 (Poets 1). Coleridge dealt with depression and needed something to help take away his nervousness and stress. He turned to opium and Laudanum. Laudanum is a mixture of opium and alcohol. This was the source of Coleridge's literary genius. But this also led to many of his downfalls (The Last Romantics 1). Coleridge became addicted to opium while trying to treat his rheumatism and neuralgic disorders....   [tags: responsible for German demanding philosophy]

Better Essays
1100 words (3.1 pages)

The Romantic Period : Samuel Taylor Coleridge Essay

- Literature exists always innovating and finding new ways of artistic, intellectual and literary movements towards success and new accomplishments. Literature stands as a way to keep society intelligent and to expand and understand new cultures and beliefs. Literature remained as a way to expand author’s horizons and use their imagination to paint a mental picture for an audience that could capture their mind in writing. Artists and authors are always driven to write the best poems, short stories and novels....   [tags: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth]

Better Essays
1145 words (3.3 pages)

The Romantic Movement Of Samuel Taylor Coleridge Essay

- One of the most known writers for creating the Romantic Movement was Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He was born on October 21, 1772, in Ottery St. Mary, Devon, England. In 1782 his father died and he was then sent away as a charity student to Christ’s Hospital. At a very young age, Coleridge was always eager to learn, which brought him to becoming a classical scholar. Coleridge soon became a student at Jesus College in 1791. In December of 1793, Coleridge was hounded by debts and decided to enlist in the Light Dragoons....   [tags: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Romanticism]

Better Essays
1927 words (5.5 pages)

The Ancient Mariner By Samuel Taylor Coleridge Essay

- The Albatross: A Symbolic Figure Through the use of poetry, many people can interpret it in many ways. Poems are said to be works of art created to relay important messages or express how the poet was feeling when it was written. Poetry, a unique concept, sometimes portrays important key elements, such as symbols, literal and figurative meanings, a theme, and a tone of the poem. When analyzing the poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, it incorporates all these components and many more that make it a wonderful work of art....   [tags: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Albatross, Superstition]

Better Essays
710 words (2 pages)

Analysis Of The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner By Samuel Taylor Coleridge Essay

- The Depressing Truth: An Analysis of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Occasionally, the wisest people are often the sadest. The harsh realities of the world often take an effect on the experienced individuals, causing a depressed mindset. The world as we know it has many luxuries, but with those commodities also comes sorrow and miseries. One piece of literature that shows this relationship is Samuel Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner. A sailor is cursed for killing an albatross, and primarily lives to tell the tale of the ghost ship....   [tags: Samuel Taylor Coleridge]

Better Essays
729 words (2.1 pages)

Essay on An Analysis Of ' Frost At Midnight ' By Samuel Taylor Coleridge

- Since Samuel Taylor Coleridge is considered one of the founding fathers of the Romanticism movement, his poems reflect the many aspects of Romanticism. “Frost at Midnight” is an excellent example of mysticism. Mysticism is the belief that nature is directly linked to the spiritual world, and thus spiritual revelations can be born out of reflecting on nature. In the poem, the narrator does not have just one encounter with nature that leads him to a revelation. He notices the nature in his current surroundings, which probes him to reflect on his childhood and how the lack of nature affected him....   [tags: Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Romanticism]

Better Essays
735 words (2.1 pages)

Essay about Images Of Violence By William Wordsworth And Samuel Taylor Coleridge

- Images of violence are deployed in various means in order to reach ends which may link to the personal views of the writer, which in term reflect greater public views of events (Dawson, 50), and political issues that are prevalent in the society. The Romantic age was highly interested in ‘violent and inclusive change’ and can be seen to have influenced the poetry of the time (Abrams, 46). William Blake, William Wordsworth, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge use violence in different ways in order to reach their end....   [tags: Romanticism, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, England]

Better Essays
991 words (2.8 pages)

Samuel Taylor Coleridge Essay

- Samuel Taylor Coleridge The French and American Revolutions had an enormous impact on the early Romantic thinkers like Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth. The aristocracies that had been controlling Europe were beginning to fall, the middle class began to grow and power was increasingly falling into the hands of the common people. This may explain why the poetry that Coleridge and Wordsworth produced was aimed at the common man, rather than the educated aristocrats. This meant a shift from elevated language and subject matter, a common trait throughout the "age of reason", and a turn toward spontaneity and emotion, otherwise known as the Romantic period (Spartacus....   [tags: Samuel Taylor Coleridge Papers]

Better Essays
1979 words (5.7 pages)

Analysis of Kubla Khan by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Essay

- Analysis of Kubla Khan by Samuel Taylor Coleridge 'Kubla Khan' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge reveals the power of the imaginative poetry. This poetry has the ability to create kingdoms and paradise. In this poem Coleridge is expressing heaven and hell through his own eyes just as the aplostles did in the ?Bible. and Milton did in 'Paradise Lost'. The poem begins with a mythical tone, ?In Xanadu did Kubla Khan/ A stately pleasure dome decree.. The poem does not give specifics to the construction of the palace....   [tags: Kubla Khan Samuel Taylor Poems Essays]

Better Essays
435 words (1.2 pages)