Rubin 's Thinking Sex : Notes For A Radical Theory Of The Politics Of Sexuality

Rubin 's Thinking Sex : Notes For A Radical Theory Of The Politics Of Sexuality

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Gayle Rubin’s “Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality” focused on the history of sexuality and sexual persecution. Gayle Rubin recognizes the idea of sex as a natural force that exists prior to social life and which shapes institutions and society. First, Rubin, emphasizes the idea of negative sex, by showcasing views by other scholars. Rubin notes Foucault in his 1978 publication “The History of Sexuality”, as “sex as the natural libedo wearing to break free of social constraint” (Rubin, 149). This leads Rubin to her understanding of sex negativity. Sex, as Rubin depicts, is dangerous, destructive and a negative force and sex negativity is any negative sexual behaviour other than married or reproductive sex. Many Western religious believe that sex should only be for reproductive reasons and that pleasure and anything outside of martial sex should not be experienced. Third, Rubin goes on to construct the charmed circle, distinguishing good and bad sex. Resulting from sex negativity, Rubin develops an illustration of good and bas sex, better known as the charmed circle. Instances of bad sex include; casual, pornographic, homosexual and commercial sex. Good sex is classified as; “pure forms of intercourse” such as marital, procreative and vanilla sex. Rubin argues that these groups referenced in the bad circle are “transsexuals, transvestites, fetishists, sadomasochists, sex workers such as prostitutes and porn models, and the lowliest of all, those whose eroticism transgresses generational boundaries” (Rubin, 151).
With sex negativity still prevalent and affecting our society daily, queer activism and queer theory can be exercised to deconstruct this negativity of sex within our society. Firstly, in...


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...these restrictions against transgender individuals, changes could be made to public facilities, satisfying all views; including gendered bathrooms or changes of signage on public facilities to accommodate all individuals, but also acknowledge notice and advocate for a non-hetero patriarchal society. Richard Jung discusses heterosexual genital security as a reason in which violence against non-heterosexuals occurs, “such persons are territorial and defensive about the gendered composition of the toilet” (Cavanagh, 4).
With gendered bathrooms, the privacy of all individuals would be maintained, a safe space for all would remain and gendering these spaces would further break these stereotypes and allow for better integration of the queer and transgender community. These issues of violence against transgenders would disintegrate and climate transphobia within society.

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