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Essay on The Role of Females in the 19th Century

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By accentuating the female’s roles and responsibilities in the 19th century, Mary Shelley emphasizes females as domestic and explains her story from a feminist viewpoint, and shows how females in her novel were created from actual people in her life. Although the women’s roles and responsibilities were completely different and often unequal to the men’s roles, the woman in Frankenstein impacted the lives of the male characters in a positive way. Some woman in Frankenstein was taken advantage of and used since females felt they were not worthy and died due to muteness.
Caroline Frankenstein’s death causes Victor’s health too decline because the indication of feminineness vanquished and the creature of evil and self-importance are created. The dying of the domestic sphere is exemplified by Victor's parting for Ingolstadt. The home that was once there no longer exists, since Victor left for Ingolstadt and Caroline died of scarlet fever. While Victor studies at Ingolstadt, he is away from the feminist sphere and the readers witness his mental and physical state weakening. Viewers portrayed Caroline as one of the main characters to Victor’s madness. Victor explains that he experienced profound pain because of his mother's death and defines death as "that most irreparable evil; the void that presents itself to the soul, and the despair that is exhibited on the countenance" (Shelley 25). Caroline offered her life when she helped Elizabeth overcome Scarlet Fever. In addition, Caroline stayed calm and sympathetic, free of blame while, on her deathbed. Caroline “Died peacefully, and her calmness pronounced love for her family, even right before her death” (Shelley 25). Shelly wanted Caroline to be the foundation for the female characters ...


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...and Shelley." SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 44.4 (2004): 693-713. Project MUSE. Web. 28 Feb. 2014.
Lunsford, Lars. "The Devaluing Of Life In Shelley's Frankenstein." Explicator 68.3 (2010): 174-176. Academic Search Complete. Web. 13 Mar. 2014.
Mellor, Anne K. “Possessing Nature: The Female in Frankenstein. A Norton Critical Edition: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: The 1818 Text, Contexts, Nineteenth-Century Responses, Modern Criticism. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. New York: Norton. 2012. 355-368. Print.
Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, A Norton Critical Edition: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: The 1818 Text, Contexts, Criticism. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. New York: Norton. 2012. 165. Print.
Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, A Norton Critical Edition: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: The 1818 Text, Contexts, Criticism. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. New York: Norton. 2012. 1-116. Print.



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