The Role of Chieftainship in a Democratic South Africa Essay

The Role of Chieftainship in a Democratic South Africa Essay

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Kgoshi ke kgoshi ka batho when translated conveys that chiefs are chiefs because of the people. Chieftainship was the ancient way of governance in Africa and particularly in Southern Africa.
Chieftainship was also considered the most common form of political structures in Southern Africa. Prior to the apartheid era chiefs and kings were very influential on the people in the Zulu, Pedi, Swazi, Ndebele, the Transkei tribes and other tribes in South Africa. In their political system chiefs and kings were seen as superior figures in the society and most individuals living in their clan had to follow orders conveyed by the chief and king. This essay will consider the role of chieftaincy in a democratic South Africa

Kincaid formula

The Kincaid Formula has been developed for Navy training manuals, that ranged in difficulty from 5.5 to 16.3. It is probably best applied to technical documents, because it is based on adult training manuals rather than school book text. Dialogs (often found in fictional texts) are usually a series of short sentences, which low- ers the score. On the other hand, scientific texts with many long scientific terms are rated higher, although they are not necessarily harder to read for people who are familiar with those terms.

Its important to note that Chiefs where not democratically elected into their roles. During the apartheid regime the ANC circle highly assumed that chieftaincy would not persist in the post apartheid era. How ever in the 1950’s sebatakgomo which was an organization cherished chiefly power. This proves that chiefly power was still influential during that period because many organizations respected chiefly power. However Chiefly power during early 1900’s was also exercised in gene...


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...s are of royal decent. Tribal elders still respect chieftaincy and state how they “were here to help and guide the chiefs”. In terms of constitutionality and chiefs, the chiefs do not have power to amend or reject legislation and can only serve as a purpose of advisory. This would therefore reduce chiefly power in a democratic South Africa .However it is important to consider that chiefs are extremely important because the interim constitution and the final constitution make provisions for traditional leaders.

In conclusion chieftaincy is very important especially considering that they exercise administration in the area. How ever certain bills must be created for the regulation of a chief’s conduct. It is also important to consider that many people still live in remote rural areas and they need guidance. I am therefore in favor of chieftaincy in democracy.

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