The Role and Rights of Women in Western Europe and Eastern Asia from 1750 to 1914

The Role and Rights of Women in Western Europe and Eastern Asia from 1750 to 1914

Length: 1519 words (4.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview


During the long nineteenth century, political revolutions, industrialization, and European imperialism resulted in dramatic changes in the role of women in Western Europe and Eastern Asia. As industrialization spread in Western Europe, women were no longer able to fulfill their dual role as a mother and a worker. After the introduction of industrialization, laborious tasks were moved from the household to factories and women were forced to choose either the life of a mother or the life of a worker. Women who chose to leave their households were subjected to harsh conditions, low wages, and long hours. The majority of married and middle-class women were confined to the home, and deprived of an education and civil rights. Unlike the women of Western Europe, the women of Eastern Asia rapidly constituted a major portion of the work force, but they also faced poor conditions and unfair wages. Similarly to Western Europe, the women of Eastern Asia were of a meaningless status and were expected to remain confined to the home. However, during the nineteenth century, the women of Eastern Asia gained greater educational opportunities. Additionally, the change in the role of women in Western Europe and Eastern Asia resulted in countless suffrage movements for civil rights. Therefore, the role of women in Western Europe and Eastern Asia was significantly similar in terms of the participation in the labor force and their attempts at gaining equal civil rights. However, the women of Eastern Asia had greater opportunities for education.
Before the introduction of industrialization, the family and the household was the basic unit of manufacturing in Western Europe. The family members would work together in commerce, and agricultural...


... middle of paper ...


...Asia participated in several suffrage movements. The women desired similar rights: equal rights, educational opportunities, improvement of their position in the family, and divorce rights; the attempts to gain these rights failed. However, women continued to fight for basic rights. Unfortunately, women’s movements immediately ended in China because of civil war and warlordism.
From 1750 to 1914, the role of women in Western Europe and Eastern Asia gradually changed as a result of industrialization, political revolutions, and European imperialism. The role of women in these two regions were parallel in that the women faced similar hardships in the labor force and women displayed political power by taking part in rebellions and fighting for civil rights. Yet, the women of Eastern Asia had greater access to education and made up an immense portion of the work force

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Censorship and Information Privacy Policies in Eastern Asia and the United States of America

- Censorship and Information Privacy Policies in Eastern Asia and the United States of America Introduction Fifteen or twenty years ago, no one would have been able to predict the magnitude of the impact that the evolution of computer internetworking technologies has had on the world. The advancement of computers and networking technologies, as well as the constant flow of new innovations has forever changed the way the human race communicates. People across the globe have been given a medium through which they can express their ideas and beliefs freely…for the most part....   [tags: Censorship Asia Essays]

Better Essays
2223 words (6.4 pages)

Essay on History of South East Asia

- Location South East Asia, a sub region of Asia located in both eastern and northern hemispheres, has been subjected to years of colonial rule. This region is composed of many different countries, including Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam and Peninsular Malaysia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, and Singapore. To the north is China and to the west of Burma is India. Most of South East Asia is located in the Indian Ocean including smaller seas like Andaman Sea, South China Sea, and Philippine Sea....   [tags: South East Asia]

Better Essays
1103 words (3.2 pages)

The Major Religions Of Southeast Asia Essay

- 1. Key Concepts a) Four major religions prevalent in Southeast Asia: 1) Islam in Indonesia and Malaysia, the southern portion of Thailand, northwestern tip of Burma, and in Central Vietnam (among the Cham areas). 2) Buddhism is prominent in Burma, Thailand, and Cambodia. In Vietnam it was introduced by the Chinese and remains in the cultural periphery. 3) Christianity exists in areas of Indonesia, Vietnam (Catholicism), and eastern Burma. 4) Hinduism is found in Bali, interior Java, Sumatra, and Kalimantan....   [tags: Buddhism, Islam, Soul, Southeast Asia]

Better Essays
1269 words (3.6 pages)

Yonosuke, Nagai & Akira Iriye on "the Origins of the Cold War in Asia" Essay

- The modern history of Asia is one of the dominance by foreign powers, and an area of major conflict between different ideologies, which led to the Cold War and the “containment” of the USSR. The “Red Scare” became the great focus in the Truman and Eisenhower administrations. Consequently, this became of great interest to many scholars, who started a three year project of “Basic Studies on the International Environment” in Japan in 1975. The book offers a series of essays on the root cause of the Cold War by a variety of authors, who cooperated to put in perspective the historical study of the undeclared war....   [tags: Cold War, Asia, history, ]

Better Essays
784 words (2.2 pages)

Mao & Gandhi: Western Thought in an Eastern World Essay

- For thousands of years, Asia led the world in technology and thought. Millions throughout those years followed the teachings of the Vedic religion, Buddhist thought, or Confucian philosophy. These societies solidified their power in the early centuries of anno domini and even boasted of self sufficient power as late as the fifteenth century. To the West however, grew nations with a different heritage of thought that soon infiltrated the Eastern world. Though their influence seemed minor in such a developed world, by the twentieth century political relations and western philosophy became a part of Asia’s reality....   [tags: technology, asia, qing china]

Better Essays
1634 words (4.7 pages)

Essay on China in Central Asia: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

- China in Central Asia – the Good, the Bad and the Ugly 1. A brief look of China’s economic presence in Central Asia 2. The Repercussion of China’s Growing Economic Influence in Central Asia 3. What China Should Do to Deal with those Challenges. Central Asia countries have abundant oil, gas and nonferrous metal reserves; at the same time they also have great potentials in hydroelectric power....   [tags: china, central asia, hydroelectric power]

Free Essays
1217 words (3.5 pages)

Essay on Economics in Asia

- Since the mid 1960s, Pacific Asia has had a remarkable rate of economic growth. This growth has been sustainable and faster than all other regions of the world (see fig. 1). This region consists of twenty-three economies but it was just eight who caused most of this amazing growth. The eight were Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, China, (the “Four Tigers”) Japan and the newly industrialised economies (NIEs) of south-east Asia, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand. The eight high performing Asian economies (HPAEs) mentioned here will be the focus of this essay....   [tags: Pacific Asia Economics]

Free Essays
1124 words (3.2 pages)

Essay on The Macro-Economic Consequences Of The Tsunami In South-Eastern Asia

- The Macro-Economic Consequences Of The Tsunami In South-Eastern Asia During the course of this essay I will illustrate the macro-economic consequences of the catastrophic tsunami that hit South-Eastern Asian coastlines in December 2004. The Indian Ocean earthquake was an undersea earthquake that occurred on December 26, 2004. The earthquake generated a tsunami that was among the deadliest disasters in modern history. At a magnitude of 9.0, it was the largest earthquake since 1964. The earthquake originated in the Indian Ocean, off the western coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia....   [tags: Ecomonics Economy Tsunami Essays]

Better Essays
1668 words (4.8 pages)

The Role of Government Policy in South East Asia in the Role of Globalisation

- The Role of Government Policy in South East Asia in the Role of Globalisation Globalisation cannot be defined as one, single process. It is a complex of processes including aspects such as the growth of global trade routes and global markets. Globalisation is linked to the growth of supraterritorial relations between people. This is the idea that international borders are becoming permeable, and that the time space divide between people and business continues to become less significant....   [tags: Papers]

Better Essays
828 words (2.4 pages)

The Role of Media on Middle Eastern Conflicts Essay example

- The Role of Media on Middle Eastern Conflicts 'By now, all of us realize that there is a high powered media campaign aimed at promoting the war on Iraq and shaping the views of the American people, relying on media-savvy political strategy to sell the administration's priorities and policies' 'Systematic sources of bias in TV coverage of international affairs not only distort information, but can also restrict citizens' awareness and options, and thereby produce more social control. The focus here is on the way TV news formats can limit, constrain, and distort information about terrorism.' The relationships between countries in the Middle East and with the West have never been ones o...   [tags: News Coverage media Middle East Essays]

Better Essays
4376 words (12.5 pages)