The River Mountain By N. Scott Momaday Essay

The River Mountain By N. Scott Momaday Essay

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In The Way To Rainy Mountain, the author N. Scott Momaday makes a clear use of figurative language throughout the story and descriptive language to describe the nature around them, explains their myths about how their tribe came to be a part of nature, as well as the importance in nature that are a part of the Sundance festival and the tai-me.
The story made clear how the Kiowas appreciate and respect the nature around them. Momaday gives a deep explanation of what it was like to be in Rainy Mountain when he describes the changes in weather: “Winter brings blizzards, hot tornadic winds arise in the spring, and in summer the prairie is an anvil’s edge. The grass turns brittle and brown, and it cracks beneath your feet”(Momaday 5). The way the weather is described in this book allows for the reader to understand what it must have felt like for Momaday to once again set foot in the Rainy Mountains. Personification is used to describe a personal connection to the nature around them and shows how important it is to Momaday and all of the Kiowas and to show how much the plains had changed since the last time he had been there, “At first there is no discrimination in the eye, nothing but the land itself, whole and impenetrable. But then the smallest things begin to stand out of the depths—herds and rivers and groves—and each of these has perfect being in terms of distance of silence and of age”(17). As he notices these differences, Momaday realizes how long it has truly been since he had left and knows that he will no longer remember this place as it once was, but as it is now.
The Kiowas cared a great deal for their surrounding in nature, and knew nothing of how the unknown came to be. To explain the unexplained the Kiowas had myths, ...


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...Kiowa tribe and why they worship it as a part of the sun dance ceremony. Momaday describes that the “great central figure of the kado, or sun dance, ceremony is the taime”(37). It was a small image representation of the tai-me on a dark-green stone. As a symbolic part of this ceremony, it is kept preserved in a rawhide box of which it is never exposed to be viewed other than during this ceremony.
In the book The Way To Rainy Mountain, N. Scott Momaday uses imagery and figurative language to describe the nature, their stories and the sun dance ceremony. The descriptive language used through the story shows how much of a great deal it is to the people of the Kiowa tribe to be close with nature. The imagery throughout the book allows the reader to understand the stories used to explain what they could not understand as well as explain the Tai-me and sun dance ceremony.

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