Essay on The Ring Of Gyges And The Allegory Of The Cave

Essay on The Ring Of Gyges And The Allegory Of The Cave

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Justice and knowledge are not easily explained; however, Plato, uses thought experiments to capture vivid images of what the two words actually mean. The Ring of Gyges and the Allegory of the Cave both enlighten the hazy ideas of the true meaning behind knowledge and justice. These readings stretch made me stretch my brain and think about things that have never crossed my mind before. Plato is a wonderful philosopher that explains things vividly so that his readers can fully understand the meaning and his view.
In the Ring of Gyges, Plato helps readers understand the true nature of justice. Glaucon and Socrates have conflicting views on justice and injustice and the reader decides which philosopher they agree with. At the beginning of Book 2, Plato states that Glaucon “was dissatisfied at Thrasymachus’ retirement” (Vaughn 26). Glaucon agreed with Thrasymachus so when he quit, Glaucon went to finish what he started. Glaucon, believed that injustice is often times better than justice because unjust leads to a better life. Glaucon states that “it pays for a man to be perfectly unjust if he appears to be just” (Vaughn 29). Glaucon also believes that the unjust man is stronger and “gods and men are said to unite in making the life of the unjust better than the life of the just” (Vaughn 29).
To prove his point, Glaucon sets up the legend of the Ring of Gyges. According to the legend, “Gyges was a shepherd in the service of the king of Lydia” (Vaughn 28). All of the sudden, “there was a great storm” and a crack in the Earth appeared and as the intrigued Gyges descended into the ground, he noticed that there was a “hollow brazen horse… [and he] saw a dead body of stature, as appeared to him, more than human, and having nothing on but a...


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...ould have given me anxiety and stress knowing its damage. In an uncontrollable circumstance, knowledge is not better than ignorance. Knowledge is very important, but there are some events where it is better to be ignorant.
Plato’s work in both the Ring of Gyges and the Allegory of the Cave evoke thoughts that have never crossed my mind. His thought experiments in both stories help better explain just and knowledge, two hazy terms in the dictionary. In the end, I agree with Socrates that it is better to be a just man and feel honor; however, I disagree with Plato in the Allegory of the Cave, because I feel that there are certain circumstances where it is better to be ignorant than have knowledge. Plato is a wonderful philosopher that puts together amazing pieces that twist my brain in a million different direction. The knowledge on knowledge and justice is wonderful.

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