Essay about Richard Taylor And Albert Camus

Essay about Richard Taylor And Albert Camus

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Several philosophers have made differing viewpoints regarding the outlook of life. Richard Taylor and Albert Camus are notably known for presenting their thoughts on whether life is meaningless or not through the use of the Greek myth of Sisyphus. The two philosopher’s underlying statement on the meaning of life is understood through the myth. The myth discusses the eternal punishment of Sisyphus who was condemned by the Gods to take a large boulder up a hill, only to have it roll back down, forcing him to repeat this task endlessly. Each conceive the myth in their own way and ultimately end with a conclusion that differs from each other. Taylor’s ideals and his take on the meaning of life contrast with what Camus presents in his argument. While Taylor suggests that there is a subjective meaning to life, Camus states that life is ultimately meaningless.
Camus establishes in his argument that life is meaningless. He believes that people following the same regiment repeatedly for years will eventually ask themselves the point of this endless behavior. For Camus, there are two ways to approach this dilemma. People can either just ignore the thought continuing on the usual path, or they can encounter the definitive awakening, no longer able to ignore the question. Camus describes this feeling as the recognition of absurdity. The absurdity comes from the constant thought about the limited number of tomorrows we have left to live. It’s not just an intellectual understanding of the issue but also a visceral understanding of your own mortality. Camus wants to understand if there is a possibility for us to live without appeal. Generally, individuals seek meaning through a higher being, a belief in God. In Camus’ perspective, this option...


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...the same pursuits would have been done and an endless cycle continues.
Taylor’s second approach conceives the myth involves imagining the condemnation of Sisyphus. In this case, the God had instilled in him an irrational desire to roll stones. The act is entirely irrational though Sisyphus finds meaning in doing these actions. Objectively from another individual’s point of view, Sisyphus’s life continues to be endless, pointless labor. Taylor points out that our lives, although objectively meaningless can be subjectively meaningful. He comes to the conclusion that the meaning to life is found in the act of “doing” and not in the result of the goals we accomplish. Life is ultimately meaningless in an objective matter, however subjectively speaking, meaning can be found by doing what you deem is purposeful and worthwhile. Taylor suggests that man is nothing but what

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