The Rhetorical Appeals And Fallacies By Mortimer J. Adler 's Article Analysis

The Rhetorical Appeals And Fallacies By Mortimer J. Adler 's Article Analysis

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In Mortimer J. Adler’s article “How to Mark A book,” he argues that you should mark up your book to note significant information. Mortimer argues, through the rhetorical appeals and fallacies, that as you write in a book it becomes “absorbed in your bloodstream,” and allows you to fully own the book. As readers searching for these techniques we can become, in a way, immune to the fallacies and observe the argument for what it truly is. This article, however,has relatively few fallacies. "How to Mark A book," uses all of the rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos) to convince you the reader to mark up your book.
First, for any analysis of an argument, we must find “who is claiming what”(Lunsford, Ruszkiewicz and Walter 94). In this case we have Mortimer Jerome Adler, an American philosopher, educator and writer; his publisher “The Saturday Review of Literature,”who commonly publish pieces similar to this. Other publishings include, yet are not limited to:”A.L Rowse: A Study in Versatility,””The A.L.A(American Library Association) Convention”and”Education of a Commentator.”
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