Rhetorical Analysis Of Roosevelt 's Speech Essay

Rhetorical Analysis Of Roosevelt 's Speech Essay

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On the morning of December 7, 1941, the United States was attacked for the first time on home soil by the Japanese. Esteemed former president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, spoke to congress the day after the Pearl Harbor attack, in what would be his most renowned speech and one of the best speeches in American history. He spoke with the purpose of persuading his audience, the congress, to go to war with Japan. The tone of the speech is melancholic but forthright, which reveals the pain and sorrow felt by citizens and the need for an urgent response.
In his speech, Roosevelt uses the rhetorical strategy pathos, in order to convince congress to his cause, through emotion. He does this through a series of steps: sadness, anger and call to action. For the first step he says “I regret to tell you (Congress) many lives have been lost” this of course creates a forlorn response from the audience, more than two thousand people died that day and almost all were soldiers. The second step he says “Japanese government deceived [The U.S.] with false statements for hope and peace...

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