Essay about Rhetorical Analysis Of Lincoln 's Second Inaugural Address

Essay about Rhetorical Analysis Of Lincoln 's Second Inaugural Address

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Uses of Rhetoric in Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address




On March 4th, 1865, the Civil War was drawing to an end and Abraham Lincoln gave his Second Inaugural Address to become the President of the United States for the second time. At this point it was clear that the North was to win the war. Instead of boasting and bragging about his victory, Lincoln took a different route in his speech. He focused instead on putting the war behind the nation and reunifying the country. In this famous speech, he used various forms of rhetoric and literary devices to achieve this goal. He first employs the use of God to appeal to the pathos in the people of the North and South. The overall tone of the speech is also one of unification rather than that of celebration. Going with this is his word choice or diction; he continuously addresses the country as one instead of two split parts. These literary devices are crucial to the success of his core purpose of speech.


While both the North and the South had differences and similarities alike, there was one thing they shared that was strong enoug...

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