Essay on Rhetorical Analysis Of Kennedy 's Inaugural Address

Essay on Rhetorical Analysis Of Kennedy 's Inaugural Address

Length: 811 words (2.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Kennedy used anaphoras to emphasize the important sections of his inaugural address, such as when he first described the world as very different now and that “man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life” (6).

He insisted that the American people should go beyond their differences and to think of “today not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom” (3). Kennedy urged the people to celebrate the history of their nation and embrace the future as a united people as he declared that “we are the heirs of that first revolution” (10). A nation and people that were “tempered by war” and “disciplined by a hard and bitter peace” both recognize the importance of American history and how it lays a foundation for the new generation to learn from the past and move forward.

Kennedy described the voice of the new generation as a group with extraordinary principles and character. The “torch has been passed to a new generation” is symbolic of not only the transfer of authority, but generational change as well (11). He portrayed this new generation of people as those who are “willing to sacrifice for an ideal,” an ideal of a unified nation and the protection of liberties around the world. Kennedy persuaded his audience effectively by painting an idealized portrait of the American people, motivating them to embrace common values and ambitions that he expresses through his inaugural address.

He explicitly accepted the limitations of his power as the head of the executive branch by acknowledging that he attributes his power to the people when he reminds them that he swore the “same solemn oath our forebears prescribed nearly a century and three-quarters ago.” By doing so, he sugg...


... middle of paper ...


...nited States and “common enemies” of mankind such as disease, poverty, tyranny and war.

As he spoke of abstract ideals such as liberty, the enemies that he had in mind were clearly the tyrannies of communism. He warned us that “nations who would make themselves our adversary” were obviously the Soviet Union and proponents of communism. Because they opposed the idealistic view of liberty in the United States, he suggested that those that oppose our sanctioned view of freedoms to be untrustworthy. To further his visions of defending the freedoms of the United States, he pledged to bear any burden and provide sufficient arms beyond doubt to promote liberty around the world.

Towards the end of Kennedy’s inaugural address, he appeared to be more conciliatory as he encouraged both sides to “begin anew” in hopes for peace, and that “civility is not a sign of weakness.”

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Rhetorical Analysis Of John F. Kennedy 's Inaugural Address Essay

- During a most critical moment in United States history, the first words from a young, incoming President Kennedy had to be nothing short of perfect. When Kennedy took office in January, 1961, America was deeply politically divided and at the height of the cold war. A new president, with much to prove, had to deliver a persuasive and unifying message to the American people. Equally important was that in addition to the American people, Kennedy would be indirectly addressing Soviet chairman Nikita Khrushchev, his Russian counterpart and primary adversary in the cold war....   [tags: Cold War, John F. Kennedy, Soviet Union]

Better Essays
1028 words (2.9 pages)

Essay on Rhetorical Analysis Of Kennedy 's Inaugural Address

- Kennedy used anaphoras to emphasize the important sections of his inaugural address, such as when he first described the world as very different now and that “man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life” (6). He insisted that the American people should go beyond their differences and to think of “today not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom” (3). Kennedy urged the people to celebrate the history of their nation and embrace the future as a united people as he declared that “we are the heirs of that first revolution” (10)....   [tags: United States, Cold War, World War II]

Better Essays
811 words (2.3 pages)

Rhetorical Analysis Of John F. Kennedy 's Inaugural Speech

- By delivering his inaugural speech, President Kennedy mentioned not only the American people, but also people from over the world including new states, old allies, and the Soviet Union. He also sought to inspire the nation after a long, divided election; to alleviate the growing fearful of drawn-out cold war, and to bless the hope for peace in the nuclear age. By using the extensive use of rhetorical devices, President successfully completed and fulfilled the goals of his speech. Therefore, after reading his inaugural speech, I strongly want to choose this speech to analysis for my research paper....   [tags: John F. Kennedy, United States, Lyndon B. Johnson]

Better Essays
1472 words (4.2 pages)

Rhetorical Analysis of Speech John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Speech

- John F Kennedy delivered one of the finest speeches on January 20, 1961 after being sworn into office. His inauguration speech was so powerful that it captured the entire nations attention, and quotes from it are still remembered by people today. It is one of the finest speeches ever written. It provides a strong appeal to pathos, ethos and logos, and it is because of this that people who never heard the speech can quote lines from it. John Fitzgerald Kennedy was the 35th president of the United States....   [tags: Rhetorical Analysis of Speech]

Free Essays
999 words (2.9 pages)

Rhetorical Analysis of President Reagan's Challenger Address Essay

- On a cold winter’s morning on the 28th day of January in the year 1986, America was profoundly shaken and sent to its knees as the space shuttle Challenger gruesomely exploded just seconds after launching. The seven members of its crew, including one civilian teacher, were all lost. This was a game changer, we had never lost a single astronaut in flight. The United States by this time had unfortunately grown accustomed to successful space missions, and this reality check was all too sudden, too brutal for a complacent and oblivious nation (“Space”)....   [tags: Use of Rhetoric]

Better Essays
991 words (2.8 pages)

Essay on Analysis of JFK’s Inaugural Address in 1961

- Analysis of JFK’s Inaugural Address in 1961 Throughout history, Presidents have used the Inaugural Address as an opportunity to help the mental framework of the American people and to the greater world. In order to effectively do so, those who craft the address must exhibit a mastery of rhetoric. More so than in other writing pieces, an Inaugural Address by nature appeals more to the rhetorical element of emotion. This is due to the fact that the address is intended to move its audience with powerful and socially lasting statements....   [tags: Papers Kennedy Essays ]

Better Essays
919 words (2.6 pages)

Rhetorical Analysis Of John F. Kennedy 's ' I Have A Dream ' Essay

- Throughout time speeches have been used to make a stance of an issue and persuade an audience to the ideals of the speaker. The most remembered speeches have taken a stance on an issue. March 7th celebrates the “To be heard day,” a day that celebrates people’s freedom and their ability to make a stance on an issue and be heard. Abraham Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address,” John F. Kennedy’s “Iganagural Address,” and Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream,” celebrate their freedom by taking a stance on an issue; using their words to persuade the audience to join in the speaker’s stance....   [tags: American Civil War, Abraham Lincoln]

Better Essays
1043 words (3 pages)

Rhetorical Choices in Political Speeches

- Every four years during any US Presidential election overzealous patriotism hits an all time high, and it truly shows with the citizen turnout at the newly elected President’s inaugural ceremony. In the months leading up to election day, Presidential candidates attempt to persuade voters to cast ballots in their favor through different forms of advertising which contains strategic rhetoric and political language. Political language otherwise known as “political propaganda”, is designed to influence masses of people within a nation, and even across the globe....   [tags: analysis, US presidential election campaigns]

Better Essays
1906 words (5.4 pages)

Analysis Of Ronald Reagan 's ' The Gate Address ' Essay

- Ronald Reagan adeptly utilizes Ethos Pathos and Logos in his Brandenburg Gate address, he attempts to sway the audience of the importance of success of the marshal plan and western values as a whole, and convince the leader of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, to open up the barrier which had divided West and East Berlin since 1961. Reagan begins his speech by addressing the people present and recognizing the “freedom” and “feeling of history” of the city of Berlin has. He makes his first reference to previous speakers by saying, “Twenty four years ago, President John F....   [tags: Cold War, Berlin Wall, West Berlin, Soviet Union]

Better Essays
1233 words (3.5 pages)

Rhetorical Analysis of JFK's Inauguration Speech

- John Fitzgerald Kennedy delivered one of the most important American speeches after being sworn in as president on January 20, 1961. His inauguration speech was so influential that it seized the nation’s attention, and quotes from it are still clearly remembered by people today. It is considered one of the best speeches ever written and ever delivered. It presents a strong appeal to pathos, ethos, and logos and accomplishes what any speaker strives for – it speaks straight to the heart of the audience and inspires people....   [tags: John Fitzgerald Kennedy]

Better Essays
919 words (2.6 pages)