Rhetorical Analysis Of Crowd Manipulation And The Inner Workings Of Governments

Rhetorical Analysis Of Crowd Manipulation And The Inner Workings Of Governments

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In American society, age eighteen serves as the line between adulthood and childhood. Turning this great age allows one to purchase lottery tickets, skydive, legally sue another individual, and, probably most importantly, vote. With the 2016 elections rapidly approaching, it is imperative that the youth of today have the proper knowledge of politics and the inner workings of governments. Unfortunately, many Americans -- whether it be young or old -- rarely seem to recognize how some of their most esteemed politicians fail in one of the most important fields when vying for leadership: morality. Politicians are experts at using crowd manipulation to either distract or misinform their audiences, principally using patriotism and criticism. To fully understand this issue, the definition of crowd manipulation is necessary. Crowd manipulation is intentionally using sociological techniques based on the principles of crowd psychology to engage, control, or influence the desires of a group in order to direct its behavior. Politicians are currently using this tactic to exploit the democratic system, and if we want to solve this, then the youth need to start thinking critically and taking part in elections.
As Americans, the greatness of our nation is usually embodied through patriotism. So, when a politician reveres the US, it distracts us from the real questions at hand and ends up becoming about how great of an American the person is, in place of their actual stance on an issue. This can be seen in many political debates. For example, in the third republican debate of the 2015-2016 elections the first question was, “What is your biggest weakness and what are you doing to address it?” To this, Governor Kasich responded, “Good question, but...


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...ional” (The Swellesley Report). America is just another nation, with as many redeeming qualities as negatives. America needs to raise youth in such a way that promotes critical thinking, so that the next generation can realize when the politicians are simply flattering to get votes. To actually resolve the issue entirely we need to rear the youth in an environment that promotes question skills and involvement in the political system. Because to continue with the American ideals -- specifically democracy itself -- that we hold so dear -- we all need to be involved in the political system. But to make said involvement matter, the youth must cut through the veil that politicians raise around their advocacy. Until this happens, politicians of today will continue to immorally exploit the freedoms of America, and the stereotype of voters as sheep will continue to be true.

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