Essay about Representation Of Victorian Ideals Of Bram Stoker 's Dracula

Essay about Representation Of Victorian Ideals Of Bram Stoker 's Dracula

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During the Victorian era women were expected to be either a mother and a wife, or a pure, innocent girl. Any other deviation from the set path resulted in punishment, both physically and socially. Deviation can vary as women being over sexual to resembling men in their actions. Bram Stoker’s novel, Dracula, is no exception in its representation of Victorian ideals. For his purposes, Stoker uses symbolism, tone, and diction throughout to convey the standard Victorian British perception of themselves. Through this conveyed standard to express his belief that gender roles are essential and relevant to Victorian society and that there are consequences if strayed from.
Symbolism was used quite frequently throughout the text, but a specific purpose that it had was to further prove Stoker’s perception of the importance of gender roles in Victorian society. The “weird sisters”, Dracula’s brides, were only weird due to the fact that they were extremely forward with their sexuality and this was not okay with the time period (Stoker166). Besides being looked down upon by the stereotypical men of the novel, they were also killed later on. The perception of the brides and later actions made against them due to the outward sexual appearance and non-adherence to gender roles, it is seen what Stoker is attempting to communicate about the places of women in society; that they must stay confined in the miniature box of purity or misfortune shall befall them. As previously stated in the introduction, women were expected to fall into two categories; a wife or mother, or a young, harmless girl. Anything out of that norm was incredibly shocking and frightening. Especially when women were to expecting to remain pure, but shifted to the polar op...


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...ehead. After this she calls herself, or the author calls her, “unclean” in a harsh specific way. Now it is evident that she is both physically and emotionally unclean. She is being punished for not following the typical roles of a woman.
Overall, Stoker believes that women must remain in their given gender role and if they were to not adhere to it they will be punished. Through the use of diction, tone, and symbolism it is seen that any women who demonstrated any type of veering from the set rules were punished. The brides of Dracula were killed, Lucy was killed, and Mina was almost killed. With every action taken by a woman that was not something a woman should do in Victorian society, there was a consequence. Through these punishments the consequences are seen and utilized to understand the point that Stoker is trying to make continually throughout the text.

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Essay about Representation Of Victorian Ideals Of Bram Stoker 's Dracula

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