Relevance of Public International Law in Human Rights Essay

Relevance of Public International Law in Human Rights Essay

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Human rights seem to be one of the most current issues worldwide. Uncountable efforts have being made to assure the avoidance of violations and abuse of them during human history. However, it is not just until the end of World War II that joined efforts by most of the countries in the world were visible, being public international law one of the ways to . It could be said that public international law is one of those important efforts that promote the defence and implementation of human rights and help to its development. This essay will define the concept of public international law, how it is this connected with human rights, and what is the importance of that connection with the application of human rights in the reality.

To begin with, it is important to define the concept of Public international law. Public international law has been considered as the law that regulates relationships between states. According to the Permanent Court of International Justice (PCIJ)(1927):
International law governs relations between independent States. The rules of law binding upon States therefore emanate from their own free will as expressed in conventions or by usages generally accepted as expressing principles of law and established in order to regulate the relations between these co-existing independent communities or with a view to the achievement of common aims.

However, this concept of public international law goes beyond states. That definition given by the PCIJ is clear but it could be said it is fairly broad. An accurate definition of Public International law is presented by the United Nations (United Nations, n.d.), where “International Law defines the legal responsibilities of States in their conduct with each other, an...


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...hts law : Six Decades after the UDHR and Beyond. Farnham, Surrey, England: Ashgate Publishing Group

Bagaric, M. (2007). Future directions in international law and human rights Melbourne, Victoria: Sandstone Academic Press.

Blay, S., Piotrowicz, R., and Martin, B. (1997). Public international law : an Australian perspective. Melbourne: Oxford University Press

Mitchell, A. & Beard, J. (2009). International law in principle. Pyrmont, Sydney: Thomson Reuters (Professional)

United Nations. (1945). Charter of the United Nations, preamble. Retrived from http://www.un.org/en/documents/charter/preamble.shtml

United Nations. (n.d.). International law. Retrived from http://www.un.org/en/globalissues/internationallaw/

United Nations (1948) Universal declaration of human rights (UDHR). Retrived from http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Documents/60UDHR/bookleten.pdf

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