Relationship between Caliban and Prospero in Act I of The Tempest Essay

Relationship between Caliban and Prospero in Act I of The Tempest Essay

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The short extract taken from “The Tempest” helps us learn a lot about the characters Prospero and Caliban and their relationship within the play.
Prospero, when we first meet him, emerges as a very controlling and dominant figure on the island, mainly because he refers to the character Caliban as his “slave”. This shows us that Prospero must be a powerful man and that he has authority over the island and its people. Prospero uses his power to abuse Caliban, and he threatens him with phrases such as “thou shalt have cramps, side-stitches...” if he does not comply with his orders. But when Caliban refuses to obey him, Prospero resorts to insults in order to control him because he tells Miranda, his daughter, “But, as ‘tis/We cannot miss him” meaning that they cannot survive on the island themselves. Through the language used, we quickly learn how Prospero believe that he is “above” Caliban, because he calls him names like “savage”, “hag-seed” and “poisonous”.
Caliban, however, is not a weak and passive slave as one might expect. Instead he threatens both Prospero and his daughter, “...

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