Radical Feminism and Hip Hop Essay examples

Radical Feminism and Hip Hop Essay examples

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Since its emergence in the South Bronx in the 1970’s, hip hop has spread to both urban and suburban communities throughout the world. Once an underground genre of music, it is seen in commercials, movies, television shows, etc. It has transformed from music and expanded into a full culture. It has even made its way into fashion and art. Men have always been on the front line of Hip Hop. However, the lyrics and images have changed tremendously. Lyrics and images that once spoke upon the injustices and empowerment for the African American people is now filled with money, cars, jewelry, and of course women.
Today’s hip hop generation is criticized for its negative portrayal of women. Every music video that is produced features scantily clad women with dancing sensually. Feminists speak against them because they are continuing to sexualize the female form, degrade women by using terms such as “bitch” and “hoe” to describe them, and in all continuing to make them second class citizens. Radical feminism focuses on such oppression in society and the existence of patriarchy/male dominance. All of which is evident in Hip Hop.
Patriarchy creates a social division. It is often used to describe the power between a male and a woman. This idea is important in Radical Feminism. Seen as the root of female oppression, Radical Feminists recognize that patriarchy is everywhere. Radical feminist came about because they were not happy with the course of action taken by the first wave of feminists. Radical feminists wanted a revolution, not just reform; they wanted to do things their way as opposed to following “the system”. So they came up with their own theories that fit their way of thinking and often were at odds with the reformer feminists...


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...lackademics.org. Word Press, 2006. Web. 01 May 2012. .

Burke, Colleen. "Women and Militarism." Women and Militarism. Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Web. 05 May 2012. .

Hooks, Bell. "Sexism and Misogyny: Who Takes the Rap?" Race & Ethnicity. Web. 06 May 2012. .
Hooks, Bell. We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity. New York: Routledge, 2004.
Mgadmi, Mahassen. "Black Women’s Identity: Stereotypes, Respectability and Passionlessness (1890-1930)." LISA E-Journal. Web. 06 May 2012. .

Zieber, Maureen. "Definition of Radical Feminism." Suite101.com. Web. 08 May 2012. .



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