Racial Segregation And The Civil Rights Movement Essay

Racial Segregation And The Civil Rights Movement Essay

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Times were looking up for African Americans, their new freedom gave them the option to go down a road of either criminal actions or to make something out of themselves. But the presence of racism and hatred was still very much so alive, Klu Klux Klan, although not as strong as they were after the Civil War was still present. Laws like Jim Crow laws and “separate but equal” came into play and continued to show how racism was alive. Besides these actors of racism, blacks still started gaining a major roll in American society.
Racial segregation hits its peak in the early 60’s and goes on into the 70’s with the civil rights movements become a know event around the world. In this time period we see the rise of people such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcom X. These two people were some of the most influential in the civil rights movements. During this time, we also see the tactics of the civil rights movements to change. Going from merely protests to escalate to non-violent sit ins and in some cases sometime violent protests.
In 1960’s the south is resembling more of what it had looked like 100 years ago. “The mood of the South today us frequently compared with what it was 100 years ago- as the South stood as the threshold of a civil war.” George E. McMillan Reports on Racial Condition in the South in 1960 in [Reading the American Past] edited by Michael Johnson (New York: Bedford/St. Martin, 2012), 238. With the racial tensions growing is it becoming more present that the chance of a violence to break out is very high. The blacks have also reached a point in segregation that they are starting to become more open to the possibility of violence. “The negroes are infused with a new determination, and are ready to risk violence t...


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...o stop them. I though to waging a war in protest against the killings all by myself" Moody, Anne 202-203. Anne shows through this quote how she was tired of the killing and protesting and was wanting to end all this madness all by herself. The books ends with no real resolution. She learns that her fathers’ wife’s brother was murdered and no real solution comes to end the story in a happy manor.
The time period of 1887-the 2000’s has been filled with racial segregation towards African Americans. From slavery to Jim Crow laws black have faced huge and daunting challenges in their way for their fight for equality. With such people as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcom X they were able to lead blacks to an almost equal United States, although there are still challenges needed to be faced African Americans have come further than they could have dreamed of since 1887.

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Racial Segregation And The Civil Rights Movement Essay

- Times were looking up for African Americans, their new freedom gave them the option to go down a road of either criminal actions or to make something out of themselves. But the presence of racism and hatred was still very much so alive, Klu Klux Klan, although not as strong as they were after the Civil War was still present. Laws like Jim Crow laws and “separate but equal” came into play and continued to show how racism was alive. Besides these actors of racism, blacks still started gaining a major roll in American society....   [tags: African American, Black people]

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