Essay on Race Relations in the South

Essay on Race Relations in the South

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Slavery has existed in one form or another for centuries and in some places in the world it still exists today. In most places slavery is a way of life and there is nothing that can be done about it, and in southern America that was the case too for over three hundred years. During that period many people fought against slavery and tried to get it abolished from the country, but little did they know how long and how brutal the fight would be. Even after slavery was abolished by the thirteenth amendment in 1865, the African American and some European people suffered even harder times than they did during the years of slavery. After slavery was abolished a few years later the Jim Crow laws were introduced in the south, making it nearly impossible for African Americans to live a free life, and these laws would eventually shape the race relations in the south for several years to come. The Jim Crow laws made African Americans second class citizens to the white people of the south. Even though slavery was abolished in the south, these laws made sure that African Americans were not able to enjoy their new found freedom. These laws were implemented by white community to make sure that they kept the power that they once had over the African Americans, because they were afraid of what might happen if they gain power. The white people in the south were successful in doing so for almost eighty years.
In order to understand why the African American population was treated like second class citizens during the Jim Crow Era, it is important to understand why slavery started in the south. Slaves were first brought to the United States in the early 17th century from Africa, because they were cheaper and could provide plentiful amounts of labor fo...


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...Court decided that this was not unlawful, Chief Justin Earl Warren made the final decision saying “"We conclude that the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." This was the first time that the African Americans began to see themselves making strides towards being equal.
The African American race suffered one of the hardest times in American history from slavery to the Jim Crow era. They were treated like second class citizens just because they had a different color of skin. They lived most of their lives being completely segregated from the rest of their community and were beaten or killed for no reason. They fought hard to make changes and risked their lives, and even still today they continue to fight racism, but they have come a long way since the Jim Crow era and will continue to fight on.





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