Questioning the Fairness of Racial Preferences Essay

Questioning the Fairness of Racial Preferences Essay

Length: 1287 words (3.7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Racial preferences — i.e., discrimination — are usually viewed as a way to help minorities. Often overlooked, however, is the harm they cause these same individuals. Since the late 1960s, discussions regarding racial preferences arose out of fairness questions. Supporters saw preferences as a necessary method of ensuring that racial minorities receive equal opportunity in the real world and not just paper promises of fair treatment. Opponents viewed preferences as reverse discrimination continuing racist habits under a disguise. Affirmative Action’s attempt to end racial imbalances in higher education that has burdened minorities creates an immoral and unfair solution: student being admitted to universities for which he or she is barely qualified.
Research finds that students tend to be overwhelmed and move to easier majors after enrolling. “Some 40% of black students entering college, for example, say they expect to major in science or engineering. But when they get to schools where most of the other students are better prepared – with much higher SAT scores and more rigorous high school course work – the chance of failure is high” (Sanders 2). Race preferences ensure that students are accepted into schools where they will have trouble competing. “Another adverse effect is lower incentives for students in preferred groups to work to the best of their ability before college. Knowing they’ll get a boost on account of their race, many are content with high school work that’s merely satisfactory” (Leef 2). In other words, minorities attending elite colleges due to racial preferencing are not likely to remain in the major they originally chose because of the unexpected amount of workload that they are unprepared for. ...


... middle of paper ...


...m of why so many African-Americans and Latinos are academically uncompetitive; and It involves states and schools in unsavory activities such as deciding which minorities will be favored and which ones (e.g., Asians) not” (Clegg 2).
American higher education offers a place for everyone including those who barely escaped high school, which makes affirmative action and racial preferences in college admissions pointless. Preferences aren't necessary to teach students how to deal with diversity. The Constitution explicitly commands nondiscrimination, meaning that in certain circumstances, it violates the law. Race-based preference produces a population of students whose intellectual strength varies strongly according to race. Many critics of Affirmative Action say that there is at best a weak correlation between race and having a range of views presented in the room.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Racial Preferences and Discriminations still Exist Essay

- “In today’s Grand Old Party there is only one correct answer to the discussion about racism. And that is: There is no racism in America anymore. Except reverse-racism against whites” once said by Bill Maher a well known comedian and HBO host. Reverse discrimination is the unfair treatment of people of majority groups resulting from privileged policies, as in college or work admissions intended to remedy discrimination towards minorities. It is often said that minority groups like, African Americans and Mexican Americans have a more difficult time having a successful life like getting a degree or a job....   [tags: hispanics, dow jones, reverse discrimination]

Strong Essays
1119 words (3.2 pages)

Racial Preferences and the Constitution Essay

- Racial Preferences and the Constitution The Constitution has survived two World Wars, a Civil War, and even slavery. This piece of paper was written to limit government in our lives and proclaim our rights as individuals. Through the course of time, Amendments have been added to aid in current events that were not foreseen when the Constitution was originally written. Sixteen presidents after the Constitution was written, slavery was abolished and the Thirteenth Amendment was passed.. Three years later came the Equal Protection clause in the Fourteenth Amendment and two years after that, the Supreme Court addressed voting rights in the Fifteenth Amendment....   [tags: Supreme Court Race Essays]

Strong Essays
1906 words (5.4 pages)

Fairness and Justice in the Australian Legal System Essay

- The Oxford Learner’s Dictionary defines fairness to be ‘the quality of treating people equally or in a way that is reasonable’ and justice as ‘the quality of being fair or reasonable’ (Oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com, 2014). Investigation of the characteristics of the Australian Legal System (ALS) including its adoption, structure and operational rules, reveal that for the most part the system is based on these two attributes. This inference is further evidenced by the legally binding operational framework assigned to the financial services industry and reflected in the codes of practice that also guide it....   [tags: ALS, fairness, justice]

Strong Essays
1278 words (3.7 pages)

Why the US Should Implement Bans on Racial Preferences or Affirmative Action for Universities

- Affirmative action or “racial preferences” are a hotly contested issue in the United States. For over four decades many states’ public universities have used race in the awarding of admissions preferences for minority applicants. Ten states have banned the use of racial preferences in university admissions including Michigan where on April 22, 2014 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a voter approved ban on affirmative action. This policy paper attempts to influence state legislatures and officials to adopt similar bans in their home states not because the United States no longer suffers from racism and bias, although this bias has been significantly reduced since 1960’s, but on the gro...   [tags: Admission Statistics, State Legislature]

Strong Essays
2401 words (6.9 pages)

Fairness In The Workplace Essays

- Fairness In the Workplace                           American society is slowly, but surely, moving towards equality in the workplace. In the past decade laws have been passed that prohibit discrimination in hiring, retaining and promoting employees based on race, gender, disability and religious beliefs. Although not all groups have been included yet, the movement towards a more just workplace is evident. Nowadays, almost every single employer will have the sign 'Equal Opportunity Employer' under the name of the company, especially when recruiting....   [tags: Workplace Essays]

Strong Essays
1118 words (3.2 pages)

Improve Affirmative Action by Removing Quotas and Racial Preferences Essay example

- Improve Affirmative Action by Removing Quotas and Racial Preferences Affirmative action has assisted many members of minority groups in creating equal opportunities in education and employment. Who could object to assisting these minorities, who suffered years of discrimination, in getting the equal opportunity they deserve. The problem is, affirmative action promotes racial preferences and quotas which cause mixed emotions. One time supporters of affirmative action are now calling out “reverse discrimination”....   [tags: Papers]

Strong Essays
2199 words (6.3 pages)

The Fairness Doctrine Essay

- The United States Federal Communications Commission, also known as the FCC, introduced the Fairness Doctrine to make broadcasters report controversial issues of public importance in a manner that was equally balanced, honest, and fair. Broadcasting companies were required to provide a certain amount of airtime reporting accurate and fair information both for and against public issues. Broadcasters were not required to provide equal time for opposing views, but were required to present opposing viewpoints....   [tags: Federal Communications Commission]

Strong Essays
942 words (2.7 pages)

Racial Segregation And The United States Essay

- Throughout the 21st century, our perspectives on inequality have drastically changed. African Americans and Whites can attend the same school, walk the same street, even use the same bathroom facilities. Same-sex marriage has even been legalized in the United States. America now has a different outlook on inequality but even though laws have been passed, discrimination still exists against African Americans and also homosexuals. A major concern of Dr. King Jr. was racial segregation. Racial segregation is the enforced separation of different racial groups in a country, community, or establishment....   [tags: Racial segregation, African American]

Strong Essays
1095 words (3.1 pages)

Racial Stereotypes on Television Essay

- For many years, racial and ethnic stereotypes have been portrayed on multiple television programs. These stereotypes are still illustrated on a day-to-day basis even though times have changed. Racial or ethnic stereotypes should not be perpetuated on certain television programs. These stereotypes provide false information about groups, do not account for every person, allow older generations to influence younger generations, create tension between groups, and affect people in many ways. To begin, racial or ethnic stereotypes on certain television programs provide false information about groups of people....   [tags: Racial and Ethnic Bias on TV]

Strong Essays
1870 words (5.3 pages)

Racial Profiling is a Valuable Policing Tool Essay

- Former President Clinton called for a national crackdown on racial profiling and ordered federal law enforcement authorities to begin an investigation. (1) Vice President Al Gore promised the NAACP that should he become president eliminating the practice of racial profiling by the nation's police departments would be a top priority. (2) New Jersey Governor Christy Whitman fired Police Superintendent Carl Williams after the 35-year veteran trooper said in an interview that minorities are more likely to be involved in drug trafficking....   [tags: Racial Profiling is Necessary]

Strong Essays
1709 words (4.9 pages)