The Quartet : Orchestrating The Second American Revolution Essay

The Quartet : Orchestrating The Second American Revolution Essay

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Joseph Ellis’s The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789 is a factual and historical account of events leading up to the creation of the Constitution of the United States of America as well as the unification of the states. This historical narrative centers on four prominent politicians, George Washington, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay, who are credited with creating the American republic. These statesmen shared many commonalities as they were all deeply invested in the American Revolution, found deficiencies within the Articles of Confederation, and yearned for a modified constitutional framework that would sustain the American republic. Though the founding fathers formulated one objective, to form a Constitution in order to maintain an American republic, they had no outline or specific plan on how to execute their goal. Ellis, in contrast, had the advantage of retrospect, as he presented the establishment of the American republic as a special destiny, a creation that was bound to occur. In Joseph Ellis’s The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, the founding fathers’ initial attempts to forge the constitution and oversee the birth of this nation, while realizing the likelihood of failure, depicted their explorative and experimental-oriented nature. However, Joseph Ellis believed that the strong leadership abilities and built-in advantages of the statesmen led to the inevitable formation of the American republic.

The founding fathers were skeptical of the future of the republic as they initially experimented with possible solutions in order to unify the states. The Revolutionary War caused America to be drained of its resources and crippled economically. A nation pla...


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...see the birth of the American republic proved to be a perilous experiment by our founding fathers, who, despite their skepticism, proceeded relentlessly to unite the colonies. Historian Joseph Ellis, however, believed that the strong leadership abilities of these statesmen led to the inevitable formation of the American republic. The Quartet, consisting of George Washington, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay, recognized a vital flaw imbedded within the structure of the republic, and urged for a solution. With the formation of a new government, new rights-oriented amendments, checks and balances system, and new policies, the government of the United States of America modified and adjusted itself. These new solutions would not only be a temporary replacement to the problem, but would fundamentally change the framework and essence of the American republic.

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