The Purpose of Punishment in a Modern Society Essay

The Purpose of Punishment in a Modern Society Essay

Length: 2222 words (6.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Punishment has been in existence since the early colonial period and has continued throughout history as a method used to deter criminals from committing criminal acts. Philosophers believe that punishment is a necessity in today’s modern society as it is a worldwide response to crime and violence. Friedrich Nietzche’s book “Punishment and Rehabilitation” reiterates that “punishment makes us into who we are; it creates in us a sense of responsibility and the ability to take and release our social obligations” (Blue, Naden, 2001). Immanuel Kant believes that if an individual commits a crime then punishment should be inflicted upon that individual for the crime committed. Cesare Beccaria, also believes that if there is a breach of the law by individuals then that individual should be punished accordingly.

According to David Garland, punishment is a legal process where violators of the criminal law are condemned and sanctioned with specified legal categories and procedures (Garland, 1990). There are different forms and types of punishment administered for various reasons and can either be a temporary or lifelong type of punishment. Punishment can be originated as a cause from parents or teachers with misbehaving children, in the workplace or from the judicial system in which crimes are committed against the law. The main aim of punishment is to demonstrate to the public, the victim and the offender that justice is to be done, to reduce criminal activities and to deter people from wanting to commit any form of crime against the law. In other words it is a tool used to eliminate the bad in society or to deter people from committing criminal activities.

Theories of punishment indicates that criminals and lawbreakers are pr...


... middle of paper ...


... Miethe, T., Lu, H. (2005), Punishment: A comparative historical perspective. Cambridge University Press

Reid, S., (2000). Crime and Criminology, 9th edition. McGraw Hill Publishers. USA

Siegel, L. (2008). Essentials of Criminal Justice. 6th Edition. Wadsworth Cengage Learning.
Georgia, USA.

White, J. (2000). Contemporary Moral Problems. 9th edition. Cengage Learning Inc. USA


Journal Article

Shichor, D. Following the penological pendulum: The survival of rehabilitation. Federal
Probation, 00149128, Jun92, Vol. 56, Issue 2


Websites

Chappels J., (2010). Death Penalty Information Center Issues, 2010 Report.
www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/deterrence-states-without-death-penalty.
Retrieved on February 16, 2011

Christianson, S. (2010). Death Penalty Contradictions. www.standown.typepad.com/weblog/../death-penality-contradictions.html

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Role of Capital Punishment in Modern Criminal Punishment

- Role of Capital Punishment in Modern Criminal Punishment Capital punishment has continued to be used as the major punishment for convicted felons for a long time now. However, it has been a subject of controversy in recent years and has been seen as an inhuman mode of punishment in the modern era. This is because of the various legal challenges it faces and the methods used in executing the punishment, which include the use of a firing squad, lethal injections and the electric chair among others....   [tags: Capital Punishment, Death Penalty]

Strong Essays
978 words (2.8 pages)

Essay on Family Values, Legal, And Modern Society

- A society grows great when old men plant trees in whose shade they know they shall never sit. Societies have changed from traditional to modern over a period of time due to the efforts made by the people for betterment of societies. Traditional and modern societies are two different ideas. Traditional societies are the way communities are ruled by the predominant norms and practices. Whereas, modern societies refer to the present world we are living. Major changes in traditional society were political, economical, and social, which led to revolutionize society, to become a modern society....   [tags: Sociology, Gender role, Family, Society]

Strong Essays
1698 words (4.9 pages)

The Death Penalty in Modern Society Essay

- Since the reinstatement of the death penalty by the Supreme Court in 1976 there have been 1,245 criminals legally put to death as a punishment for a multitude of disturbing crimes (6). The death penalty’s reinstatement as a possible punishment for crimes ranging from treason to murder has brought the constitutionality and morality of the punishment into question by anti-capital punishment protesters. This has led to a great deal of debate between pro- and anti- capital punishment supporters. Defenders of the death penalty state that it is an effective deterrent and punishment for murder (1), while the opposing side claims that it is the definition of hypocrisy at an ultimate and inhumane lev...   [tags: capital punishment, death penalty]

Strong Essays
2110 words (6 pages)

Essay on Media Criticism of Modern Family

- Introduction: In 2009, ABC aired the first episode of Modern Family, a show about three families who are all related. Since then the show has become a huge success as audience’s find enjoyment in watching the characters as they face everyday trials and tribulations. Each episode runs for a half hour and takes place in a California suburb. The producer’s center the plot on a specific controversial issue in which the characters are forced to confront and handle, as well as resolve and give their reactions prior to the shows ending....   [tags: Social Issues, Modern Family]

Strong Essays
3061 words (8.7 pages)

A Call to End Capital Punishment Essay

- Capital punishment is a very divisive topic in the United States and also in our home state of West Virginia. This is a topic that sparks passion within people about the equality and effectiveness of the American Judicial system. Everybody is entitled to their own opinion about this topic but the throbbing question that lingers in the air is that is it morally right. Capital punishment also known as the death penalty is the brutal ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime which might be murder or treason....   [tags: Capital Punishment, Death Penalty]

Strong Essays
1658 words (4.7 pages)

Capital Punishment : The Death Penalty Essay

- Ever since ancient times, capital punishment was a way to punish those that broke the most severe laws of the time. In Ancient Rome, people were placed in the colosseum to be eaten alive by ferocious lions as a public event. The Ancient Chinese would have public executions for people who have committed 144 to 89 offenses or a major offense like human trafficking. Public guillotine executions were the favored form of execution in the middle ages to 1977, when it was last used (Laurence 3). People believed that the guillotine was the most humane ways to execute someone as it was a swift slice of the head....   [tags: Capital punishment, Murder]

Strong Essays
1728 words (4.9 pages)

The Argument of Capital Punishment Essay example

- There not many issues in the criminal justice system that have caused more heated discussions and arguments as consistent and strong as that of the argument of capital punishment. There have been many religious arguments involved in both sides of the argument, citing both the need for justice and the sanctity of human life. This debate regarding the death penalty has become a complex issue in recent years with concerns as to the equality of the criminal justice system, the position of physicians in assisting in executions, and the likelihood of reform, improvement and rehabilitation amid individuals currently serving on death row....   [tags: Capital Punishment, Death Penalty]

Strong Essays
1845 words (5.3 pages)

Essay about Capital Punishment : The Barbaric Means

- Capital Punishment: The barbaric means Capital punishment or the death penalty a punishment usually given to those who commit crimes such as murder. Though already outlawed in Canada as early as 1976, a poll conducted in 2012 by Angus Reid Public Opinion along with the Toronto Star found that 63 percent of 10,000 Canadians which were randomly selected across Canada believe the death penalty is an appropriate punishment. A baffling belief, as Capital Punishment serves no practical purpose in today’s society....   [tags: Capital punishment, Prison, Crime, Murder]

Strong Essays
896 words (2.6 pages)

Essay about The Purpose of the Law of Torts

- Considerable effort has been expended in attempts to identify the purpose of the law of torts. However, the range of interests protected by the law of torts makes any search for a single aim underlying the law a difficult one. For example, actions for wrongful interference with goods or trespasses to land serve fundamentally different ends from an action seeking compensation for a personal injury. Nevertheless, following the research I have carried out the fundamental purpose of the law of torts is to achieve compensation and appeasement and to obtain deterrence and justice, in order to determine the conditions under which certain losses may be shifted to persons who created the risks which...   [tags: legal issues, punishment]

Strong Essays
1562 words (4.5 pages)

Punishment Essay

- There are many explanations for what punishment characterises. For Emile Durkheim, punishment was mainly an expression of social solidarity and not a form of crime control. Here, the offender attacks the social moral order by committing a crime and therefore, has to be punished, to show that this moral order still "works". Durkheim's theory suggests that punishment must be visible to everyone, and so expresses the outrage of all members of society against the challenge to their collective values....   [tags: Emily Durkheim]

Strong Essays
1113 words (3.2 pages)