Propaganda And Its Effects On The Society Of 1984 Essay

Propaganda And Its Effects On The Society Of 1984 Essay

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“"Propaganda is as powerful as heroin, it surreptitiously dissolves all capacity to think” by Gil Courtemanche connects to the sad fact of using propaganda as a deadly weapon to feed people with false information and stop them from thinking. George Orwell’s novel, 1984 describes a totalitarian dystopia society where the Party is constantly brainwashing its citizens with information that is beneficial to its own rights. On the opposite side people are working for the party just like dominated slaves for their masters without knowing of what’s going on. But, in order for the party to achieve this goal they have to use different techniques of propaganda in Oceania to create fear for people so that they can obey the rules. The use of propaganda in the society of 1984 takes away freedom from individuals because of the absence of privacy, thinking and making decisions.
Monitoring and surveillance is almost visible in every part of Oceania, from your own house up to the microphones hidden in trees at the countryside. There is not such word as privacy defined in the world where 1984 is taking place. The most common device that is used to control the party members is a two-way screen which almost has the functionality of a television except the fact that its purpose is monitoring and propaganda. The party has the permission to get instant images of people’s house and of what they are doing. “It was terribly dangerous to let your thoughts wander when you were in any public place or within range of a telescreen. The smallest thing could give you away.” (Orwell) This quote which is taken from the novel states that any kind of suspicious facial expression or thoughts that don’t match with the party rules can cause the violator’s death. For in...


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... by saying: “I drug my heart with doublespeak/All my misgivings disappear.” As long as you don’t express what you think, you’ll be fine from any danger.
In conclusion, the concept that propaganda is brainwash becomes clear. The government changes the way that reality looks like by altering the past, use of pure power and propaganda. People really think that the government is there to help them from their enemies, they get happy with the increasing food rations announcement and really think the Big Brother exist. Therefore, the citizens of Oceania, especially the proles prevent rebellion against the party because they admit that they have an ideal society. The winners in this type of society, are all the members of the inner party and higher ranks members whom steal away the rights of living from the lower class in order to create a lavish lifestyle for themselves.

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