Essay about Propagand The Film As Propaganda

Essay about Propagand The Film As Propaganda

Length: 926 words (2.6 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The Film as Propaganda
Although many people view films as a mere form of entertainment, it is difficult to accept them as just that given the fact that throughout history, films have been used many times as propaganda. Sometimes they were used to shape the public’s opinion on matters of global importance while other times they were used to gain the public’s approval on the horrifying tragedies that come with war, with the latter usually being the case (Horgan). Whether it be the Japanese, the Germans, or even the Americans, propaganda through film has helped many countries win many wars and achieve their political agendas in the past. This practice has continued on to today and will certainly continue in the future.
From the beginning, the basis of the propaganda film has always been the intentional bias that the director or organization in charge of making the film chooses to portray. Many times this bias is easier to distinguish in films that are from state-controlled film industries, such as those of North Korea and China, rather than those from independent film industries such as that of the United States, otherwise known as Hollywood (Cody). In Hollywood, producers and movie studios usually have the upper hand in deciding what content gets to be sent for the public’s viewing because very few people can afford making films, and thus solely their opinions are expressed to the masses (Giambrone). Surprisingly, the situation is all the more similar in state-controlled film industries as the government pushes content that supports their own political agendas and interests; as Giambrone explains, “In fascist regimes, the state run film industry propagandizes in the interest of the national agenda. In communist regimes the state r...


... middle of paper ...


...c, like citizens of any other country, want to always believe that they are on the right or good side of war, and films like American Sniper help us justify soldiers killing children in the name of war (Horgan). Just as President Roosevelt did during World War II, the George W. Bush administration met with several Hollywood film directors to make films that supported Bush’s policies on war and policies of national security. This meeting then resulted in the tactically organized releases of “jingoistic war films such as Black Hawk Down, We Were Soldiers, and Behind Enemy Lines, ...while war films with a critical perspective such as The Quiet American and Buffalo Soldiers were quietly held back” (Westwell). However in 2004, Michael Moore released Fahrenheit 9/11 which seeked to check the power of political leaders (such as Bush) on films in the United States (Westwell).

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay about Propagand The Film As Propaganda

- The Film as Propaganda Although many people view films as a mere form of entertainment, it is difficult to accept them as just that given the fact that throughout history, films have been used many times as propaganda. Sometimes they were used to shape the public’s opinion on matters of global importance while other times they were used to gain the public’s approval on the horrifying tragedies that come with war, with the latter usually being the case (Horgan). Whether it be the Japanese, the Germans, or even the Americans, propaganda through film has helped many countries win many wars and achieve their political agendas in the past....   [tags: World War II, World War I, United States, Film]

Better Essays
926 words (2.6 pages)

Comparing American Propaganda Film And German Propaganda Essay

- Compare American Propaganda film to German Propaganda film in WWII and analyse what values each reflect about the respective country Propaganda Films purposely try to convince or influence the opinions or behavior of the viewer. Propaganda is defined as, “ideas, facts, or allegations spread deliberately to further one 's cause or to damage an opposing cause” In WWII American Propaganda Film and German Propaganda film had many similarities and differences, each reflecting the values of … about the respective country....   [tags: Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler, Aryan race, Nazism]

Better Essays
1392 words (4 pages)

Nazi Film Propaganda Essay examples

- Propaganda is the art form of persuasion which means that it takes aim at people’ behavior, thoughts and provide them new information. World leaders make propaganda now and they did before. One of the countries which propagandized their ideas well is Nazi Germany. The thing that makes them special is Nazi Germany had a “Ministry of Propaganda” which was led by Paul Joseph Goebbels. The mission of this ministry was “to censor all opposition to Hitler and present the chancellor and the Nazi Party in the most positive light while stirring up hatred for Jewish people.”(HISTORY.COM) He was the one of the close friends of Nazi Germany’s Führer, Adolph Hitler....   [tags: censor, movies, influence]

Better Essays
729 words (2.1 pages)

Influence of Nazi Germany WWII Propaganda Films on the German Film Industry

- Intro German cinema was greatly affected during the Nazi movement between 1933 and 1945. Once appointed Chancellor of Germany on January 30, 1933 Hitler wasted no time and almost immediately began working on his propaganda strategy. Typically “propaganda targets a mass audience and relies on mass media to persuade. Propaganda is aimed at large numbers of people and, as such, relies on mass communication to reach its audience” (Gass, 14). The Nazi party used film propaganda to brainwash the German people, distract them from the harsh reality of the Nazi party, and attempt to intimidate the enemy....   [tags: Hitler's Use of Film]

Better Essays
2202 words (6.3 pages)

To What Extent Did Film Propaganda during the Second Red Scare Influence Anti-Communist Hysteria?

- Section A: Plan of Investigation The focus of this investigation is the ability of leaders to appeal to human emotion through propaganda. Propaganda became especially prevalent in the United States of America during the Second Red Scare between 1947 and 1954. Propaganda assisted in the infiltration of anti-communist ideals. This examination specifically focuses on the extent to which film propaganda during this time period influenced anti-communist hysteria. The movies produced during the Cold War glorified American democracy and an evaluation is completed discussing the impact of this glorification on society....   [tags: leaders appealing to human emotion thru propaganda]

Better Essays
1674 words (4.8 pages)

Hollywood Propaganda: The Glorification of War by the Film Industry Essay

- War has been present since the beginning of human history. Likewise, war movies have been present since the movie industry began. Just like most other genres of film, war films have been created as a form of entertainment to profit a person or organization. More people are willing to spend their money and time on a feeling of action, excitement, heroism, and patriotism than gruesome and horrid images of real and common human destruction. Propaganda has been used by governments for a very long time and when motion pictures came into existence, governments almost immediately saw the new medium as an opportunity to influence the public....   [tags: Let's Stop Glorifying War]

Better Essays
2268 words (6.5 pages)

Christmas Under Fire Essay

- Christmas Under fire is a World War II propaganda film created by the G.P.O film unit under the instruction of the Ministry of Information. It was released in 1941 in an attempt to get the isolated United States to engage Germany and the Axis powers in World War II. The purpose of the film according to the director Harry Watt was to make Americans feel “Uncomfortable while they celebrated Christmas.”(Sarah Street, 79). The film showed the Christmas of 1940 which occurred at the height of the Blitz of London....   [tags: War World II propaganda film]

Free Essays
610 words (1.7 pages)

Analyzing the Film Food Inc and the Propaganda Message for Positive Change

- Society tends to associate propaganda films with issues such as Nazi Germany and their film messages for their country; however, it is also possible for small independent companies, groups of like-minded people and individuals to use the media of film to incorporate messages for our society (The Independent, 2010). These messages are often in relation to changes that individuals should make in order to improve the standards by which they live their lives and changes to everyday habits that will benefit the individual, the individual’s family, a group of individuals or even a single person (Barnhisel and Turner, 2010)....   [tags: media, knowledge, decisions, emotions, society]

Better Essays
1448 words (4.1 pages)

Essay on The Anti-Semitic Power of Jud Süß

- ... He wanted payment in the form of the power to control the building of roads for 10 years and he also wanted the ability to control the tolls so he can charge to cross them and for their upkeep or general care. With the taxes being raised this in turn raises the prices of everything, furthering the profit of Oppenheimer, the duke and the common folk are suffering because of it and the duke and Oppenheimer are just getting richer and richer because of it. With people getting fed up with the prices getting too high, small rebellions are breaking out everywhere....   [tags: Nazi film, propaganda]

Better Essays
2418 words (6.9 pages)

How the Relation of the Camera to the Real is Problematized in The Thin Blue Line and Yuki Yukite Shingun

- How the Relation of the Camera to the Real is Problematized in “The Thin Blue Line” and “Yuki Yukite Shingun” Documentary films can include every type of discourse about the real world. The accomplishments of nonfiction film are derived from more than the stereotypical edited interview segment, and recently have been a totality that is useful as much for showing reality as it is for expressing the creative visions of its director. It is possible for the most extrinsic implications to be presented in a way that reflects individual systemics and personal expression....   [tags: Documentary and Propaganda Film]

Better Essays
2419 words (6.9 pages)