The Principles Of The Metaphysic Of Morals By John Stuart Mill Essay example

The Principles Of The Metaphysic Of Morals By John Stuart Mill Essay example

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John Stuart Mill was an English philosopher who contributed greatly to the fields of social theory, political theory, as well as philosophy. Mill was a strong proponent of the ethical theory of utilitarianism, and in his work, titled Utilitarianism, he provides support for the theory, and also attempts to respond to and do away with misconceptions held on it. On the other hand, Immanuel Kant was a German philosopher who is widely regarded as one of the most important figures in modern philosophy. Kant has had a notable influence on a number of fields, such as ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology. In his work Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals, Kant introduces a number ideas and concepts, such as Categorical and Hypothetical Imperatives, as well as discussing duty. In both Mill and Kant’s ideas and philosophies focus on concepts that effect mankind universally, as a collective, namely Mill’s Greatest Happiness Principle and Kant’s Categorical Imperative. Although both share the similarity that they focus on rules that govern humanity as a whole, there are a number of differences in their ideas, namely in their differing opinions on the role of duty and what makes an action morally right.
One area where Kant and Mill have differing opinions is on the idea of duty and how one determines an actions moral worth. Kant, in his work, describes duty as the necessity to act out of respect for the law, rather than acting as a result of an inclination. Also, Kant makes the claim that the moral worth of an action is determined by its respect for duty and the law rather than personal inclinations. According to Kant, an action is morally right when, rather than being influenced by personal inclinations and desires, it is rather...


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...ar idea that the intended effects of actions should apply evenly to the collective of humanity and contributed positively to the collective happiness, they both differ in how individuals should go about this. Kant, on one hand, stipulates with his Categorical Imperative that actions can only become laws and be considered right if they can be applied to all evenly. Kant also argues that the moral worth of actions can only be determined out a sense of duty and respect for universal laws. Mill, on the other hand, with his Greatest Happiness Principle, makes the claim that the only scale for determining the moral worth of an action is by examining how greatly it increases the collective happiness. Although both men have differing opinions how one determines an actions moral worth, they are still in agreement that actions taken should positively impact those they effect.

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