Wolves Essay

Wolves Essay

Length: 1957 words (5.6 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Powerful Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Wolves

The wolf was once a much slandered animal. In the western world, people feared and hated wolves, and this legacy is reflected in stories such as Little Red Riding Hood and The Boy Who Cried Wolf. In these popular children's tales the wolf is made out to be a prowler and a killer of livestock and people. There is some basis for The Boy Who Cried Wolf, for wolves have killed cattle and sheep. But what of Little Red Riding Hood? There are no records of wolves killing humans in Canada or the United States. Yet, when wolves were spotted near rural communities, fear used to grip the populace, but over time this has become less prevalent.

Today, many people know that scientists studying wolves have lived very close to dens where there were pups without being attacked. They have even taken pups from a den without being injured. The parents have usually run away, returning later to take their young to a more private den or to a rendezvous site (a place where the pack meets).

In areas where wolves are hunted or trapped they fear people and are very wary. However, in remote places, such as in the Canadian Arctic, they show little fear and will often allow people to live near them.
Two hundred years ago, Canis lupus, also known as gray wolves, were more widely distributed than any other mammal of historic times. They lived in large areas of North America, Europe, and Asia; the only places they could not occupy were deserts, tropical rain forests, and peaks of the highest mountain ranges. Wolves still live in large areas of the northern hemisphere; however, their primitive range has been greatly reduced due to changes in the landscape and people's efforts to exterminate them. In North America, wolves have been exterminated in the Atlantic provinces, Mexico, the United States (except Minnesota, Alaska, and some of the western states), and the heavily populated areas of southern Canada. They are still common in lightly settled portions of Canada from Labrador to British Columbia and in the Yukon and Northwest Territories.

The red wolf was once common in the southeastern United States. It has been eliminated in the wild. However, through a captive breeding program, the species is being reintroduced into its former range.
It is virtually impossible to describe the typical appearance of wolves. Wolves of many large arctic islands and Greenland usually appear sn...


... middle of paper ...


...ibou numbers decline.

Wolves have already been exterminated in many places. However, there may be less danger of such excesses in the future, as wolf control is increasingly based on biology rather than emotion. There is now a greater awareness among people that the killing by wolves of deer and other prey species, which we may want for ourselves, is not a sufficient reason for the extermination of wolves. Sometimes populations of game animals are critically low, so on biological grounds wolf control could be justified; however, control programs are always opposed by ever-increasing urban populations. Proposed wolf culls have become major political issues in many areas in North America. When controls are carried out, they need to be done to meet certain criteria, which are based on sound scientific information and stewardship of wildlife populations.
In the wilderness scheme of things wolves play an important role. And from a human point of view, the great interest and value of having this intelligent animal as part of our wilderness heritage should be sufficient justification for allowing it to survive in a wide variety of wilderness and semi-wilderness areas all over the world.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on The Effects Of Wolves On Wolves And A Trapping System

- In 1817, the Michigan government created a bounty on wolves and a trapping system. After Michigan inhabiting just under 100 wolves in 1956, it took another nine years for Michigan to put wolves under legal protection. Officials have since bounced back and forth from delisting wolves from the endangered list to in-listing them again. The Michigan DNR reported that there was a time where wolves populated all counties in Michigan. Once roaming all of North America, wolves are now only found in the Great Lakes region, northern Rockies, and the southwestern region of the United States....   [tags: Dog, Gray Wolf, Wolves, Hunting]

Powerful Essays
1042 words (3 pages)

A Glimpse into the Past with "Dances With Wolves" Essay

- Dances with Wolves is an epic film made in the year nineteen ninety shot in South Dakota and Wyoming. The film tells the story of a Civil War-era and a United States Army officer, Lieutenant Dunbar who travels to the American frontier to find a military post and befriends a local Sioux tribe. It shows how life was in times of the Civil War. The movie also shows how Indians lived and how they respected everything except the white men. This film tells the story of Lieutenant Dunbar, a United States Army Officer and a Indian tribe who eventually in time after meeting become friends....   [tags: Dances With Wolves, Native Americans, ]

Powerful Essays
644 words (1.8 pages)

Dances with Wolves: Changing from a Dignified Solider to a Sioux Warrior

- In the movie Dances with Wolves Lieutenant John Dunbar is a dynamic character; changing throughout the film from a dignified United States Army soldier, to a passionate Lakota Sioux member. On his journey, Dances With Wolves takes in many experiences many have only dreamt about. When he rides Cisco out onto the battlefield in a suicide attempt, he has no idea that he indeed will live and will never lead the same life again. John Dunbar changed in many ways reflected upon in the film, including: mindset, clothing, and his sense of identity; it is though these character traits that Dances With Wolves discovers that inside everyone is a frontier just waiting to be explored....   [tags: Dances with Wolves,]

Powerful Essays
808 words (2.3 pages)

An Analysis of Singing to Wolves Essay

- An Analysis of “Singing to Wolves” The poem, “Singing to Wolves” is a modern poem, that tries to explain to the reader how wonderful solitude is, but also considers it’s negative side, with the example of a lonely girl. The poem starts off with a brief encounter into the history of Wales, and talks about the Llanthony monks, who the reader is told were unloved by the Welsh, and thus driven to a lonely life in the wilderness. By reading this poem, it seems as though being unloved is a popular reason for solitude....   [tags: Singing to Wolves]

Powerful Essays
930 words (2.7 pages)

Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves Essay

- Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves    In his novel, ”Dances With Wolves”,  Michael Blake uses several techniques throughout the story to enhance the tone displayed to the reader.             Blake uses tones that vary from sad, (war times) to happy (victorious.)  Tone can be defined as the emotion or feeling set upon a reader during a novel/short story. Most times, the tone will change. It can change from sad to dramatic, happy to angry, angry to calm, or basically anything else....   [tags: Dances With Wolves]

Free Essays
437 words (1.2 pages)

Essay on Dances With Wolves by Michael Blake

- Dances With Wolves by Michael Blake is a novel that covers the topics of cross-culture, equality and respect. It also shows me the history of modern America. Reading this novel is a great adventure to me. Through years of getting ready, Michael Blake spent nine months on writing the book and got it done in 1981. The story happens in 1863, when US civil war was in ongoing. Knowing the potential amputation of his wounded leg, Union Army Officer Lieutenant John J. Dunbar turns suicidal and rides a horse to attract the enemy during a strange standoff....   [tags: Michael Blake Dances Wolves]

Powerful Essays
1818 words (5.2 pages)

Shifting Perceptions in Dances With Wolves Essay

- Shifting Perceptions in Dances With Wolves In Kevin Costner's motion picture Dances With Wolves, a white veteran of the Civil War, John Dunbar, ventures to the American frontier, where he encounters a tribe of Sioux Indians. At first, both parties are quite wary and almost hostile to each other, but after some time, Dunbar realizes that they have both grown to love and value each other as friends. As the movie critic Robert Ebert comments, "Dunbar possesses the one quality he needs to cut through the entrenched racism of his time: He is able to look another man in the eye, and see the man, rather than his attitudes about the man....   [tags: Dances With Wolves Film Essays]

Powerful Essays
1805 words (5.2 pages)

Dances With Wolves Essay

- Dances With Wolves In his movie Dances With Wolves actor Kevin Costner tries to do away with any preconceived notions that the viewer might have had about the Native American Indians being a savage and inhuman race. He does this by first unraveling the mysteriousness of the Indians then he brings the viewer to a point of connectedness with the Indians and their culture. We then come to a sincere appreciation for them as human beings and individuals and find ourselves siding with them in matters of allegiance....   [tags: Film Movie Dances With Wolves Papers]

Powerful Essays
1302 words (3.7 pages)

Wolves, Wild, Again Essay

- Wolves, Wild, Again For my last web paper, I thought I'd return to one of my childhood obsessions - wolves. Ever since seeing a cartoon rendition of the story "Mowgli's Brothers" from The Jungle Book (the real thing, not the horrible Disney "interpretations" of it) I fell in love with the idea of wolf-hood. Wolves were once an essential part of our "American culture" and although we drove them away and killed them off in our own country long ago, their importance in the American mind has not decreased....   [tags: Animals Wolves Nature Essays]

Free Essays
1324 words (3.8 pages)

Gender Roles in Angela Carter's The Company of Wolves Essay

- Gender Roles in Angela Carter's The Company of Wolves In her transformation of the well-known fable "Little Red Riding Hood," Angela Carter plays upon the reader's familiarity. By echoing elements of the allegory intended to scare and thus caution young girls, she evokes preconceptions and stereotypes about gender roles. In the traditional tale, Red sticks to "the path," but needs to be rescued from the threatening wolf by a hunter or "woodsman." Carter retells the story with a modern perspective on women....   [tags: Carter Company of Wolves Essays]

Powerful Essays
812 words (2.3 pages)