Essay on The Awakening as Romantic, Realistic, and Local Color Writing

Essay on The Awakening as Romantic, Realistic, and Local Color Writing

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The Awakening as an Example of  Romantic, Realistic, and Local Color Writing


A fair woman slowly, but surely, makes her way into the water.  It is obvious that she is slightly afraid, but not to the point where she is willing to stop progressing into the gradually deepening water.  She believes that after she lets the water grab her life, everything will be fine.  Sounds appealing?  I did not think so.  However, Edna Pontellier thinks that this is the best option for her.  Drowning seems to be the only way out.  The Awakening, by Kate Chopin, describes Edna Pontellier's battle against society, and how she decides to handle this battle.  This novel was considered an immoral piece of literature during the early 1900's.  Its descriptions of a strong woman who goes against a grim and strict Creole society shocked critics and readers alike.  Edna's strong will and determination cause changes that were not welcome at the time.  Despite the fact that The Awakening was unwelcome in the early 1900's, it is a widely read novel that most consider to be an extraordinary piece of literature.  The Awakening is a great novel because of its unique combination of Romantic, Realistic, and local color writing.

 

        The Awakening demonstrates Romanticism in many ways.  The accentuation of the imagination, freedom, emotion, nature, and nobility of the common man characterize Romanticism.  The Awakening demonstrates this in many ways.  For example, a mockingbird and a parrot are shown to describe the role of women of that time; they had the potential to be successful and respectful citizens, but society kept them caged in.  This demonstrates the "natural world" aspect of Romanticism.  In addition to this, constant references are ma...


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...nd city names in her writing adds a lot to the feeling behind the novel.  Using the name "Grand Isle" has a larger effect on the reader than if she were to say "beach", or even "summer getaway".  Through the utilization of local color, the reader actually feels that he or she is a part of the novel, walking alongside the characters and feeling all their pain and suffering.  He or she can form visual images of life during the time of the Creoles.

 

          Through her inclusion of Romantic, Realistic, and local color writing, Kate Chopin makes The Awakening a truly extraordinary piece of literature.  Reading this novel makes the reader feel that he or she is living during the society of that time.  This is a unique writing that demonstrates one-of-a-kind combinations of literary elements.  Every person should read this novel and appreciate it for the talent.

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