Problems with Standardized Testing Essay example

Problems with Standardized Testing Essay example

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Problems with Standardized Testing


“Where is the standardized test that can measure passion for learning, respect for others, and human empathy?” These are the words of Tom McKenna, a disgruntled high school teacher from Portland, Oregon. Like many other educators and students across the nation, Tom is tired of the system. The educational system today is composed of a series of standardized tests. Standardized tests are bad for many reasons. They cause teachers to limit their curriculum, put low-level income and minority students at a disadvantage, cause school districts to focus too heavily on raising test scores, and extract the passion for learning from students.

      In many cases teachers are encouraged to teach only material that will be seen on certain standardized tests. For this reason, teachers are forced to extract superfluous material from the course. Instead, teachers focus only on specific items from the test. Students are encouraged to memorize isolated facts and regurgitate short responses. In an article published by the FairTest organization, this method is called “teaching the test.” Teaching the test seems to be conducive to improving test-taking skills but real academic progression is not always represented.

     The aforementioned Tom McKenna was put in this very predicament. In his article titled, “The Straitjacket of Standardized Tests” he tells a story of two of his high school students engaged in a project which enthralled their interest in an unlikely subject. McKenna had become friends with a man named Sol Shapiro. Shapiro, now in a retirement home, had once been a resident in South Portland, Oregon, which was a Jewish immigrant community. McKenna’s students accompanied him to Shapiro’s house in order to conduct an interview. A few seconds into the interview Shapiro broke down in tears and the students immediately turned off the video camera and tape recorder. The students comforted Sol. They finished the interview, much of which was unrecorded.
McKenna noted that these students had an increased interest in oral history following the interview. “They wanted more.” he noted. He then adds, “Unfortunately, given the demands of current educational reform in Oregon, teachers are finding it difficult to give students the "more" they desire.” McKenna was referring to the fact that teachers in Oregon are encouraged to striv...


... middle of paper ...


... craft to focus like drones on getting the scores up." If teachers were concerned with inspiring students, they could cause students to be passionate once again.

     In my personal experience, my freshman history teacher would totally agree with my argument. He always told me that the most important part of the education process is “knowledge for the sake of knowledge.” This means that students should want to learn in order to gain intelligence. I have always kept this philosophy in high regard and have tried to apply it to my everyday scholastic life.

     The educational system should be less of a system and more of a process. It should focus on the intellectual, emotional, and spiritual development of its’ students. As long as we continue to use standardized tests a change will never be made.

Works Cited

Elmore, Richard F. “Testing Trap.” Harvard Magazine Online. October 2002
     

FairTest: The National Center for Fair and Open Testing. How Standardized Testing
Damages Education.

McKenna, Tom. The Straitjacket of Standardized Tests. Spring 1999. Rethinking Schools
Online.

“Rethinking Standardized Testing” The Seattle Press Online. 17 May 2001.
     

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