Essay John Locke: Second Treatise of Civil Government

Essay John Locke: Second Treatise of Civil Government

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John Locke was born on August 29, 1632, into a middle class family during late Renaissance England. Locke started his studies at Christ Church in Oxford. He then went into medical studies and received a medical license, which he practiced under Anthony Cooper. They became friends, and when Cooper became Earl of Shaftesbury, Locke was able to hold minor government jobs and became involved in politics. Shaftesbury steered Locke towards the views of a government whose law was fair to all, and all were under the law.

In 1679, Shaftesbury was tried for treason against James, Duke of York, who would later become King James II. Shaftesbury had tried to prevent James's right of succession, so he fled to Holland, and Locke followed. Locke returned to England with Queen Mary when she overthrew James II in the Glorious Revolution. The support which Locke showed for Mary demonstrates his mindset of politics, and shows his opposition towards despotic rulers and divine right. Locke saw many important men while in England, including Sir Isaac Newton, of whom he wrote. Through Locke's friendships with numerous government officials, Locke became influential in the politics of the seventeenth century.

Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, written in 1690, dealt with the subject of human philosophy, and was written with consistency to the theories of Newton. Locke's views that experience produces ideas led him to believe that people are not aware of physical objects, but rather that they are aware of symbols for those objects, a believe shared by others such as Galileo and Descartes before him.John Locke became convinced that true knowledge cannot be attained in natural science, but only through concrete mathematics. This theory was later adopted by several other philosophers. Locke was the first theorist of the philosphy of liberalism, which says that the state exists to preserve the natural rights of its citizens.Locke's philosophical beliefs and theories are the basis of numerous other philosophers, and play an important role in the development of the American judicial system.

Some examples of these are the pursuit of happiness and the system of checks and balances throughout the branches of government, known as the separation of powers.Locke's view of the state of nature is a state of being where all men are created equal, and all men have the right to prote...


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...her sources, so the government is steered into a straight path of justice.Locke's theories on government are also justified by the fact that man is capable of doing good towards others, and the society helps men protect one another. This enables man to be content in society, so that he is not always on the lookout for offenders of the laws of nature, for the laws of justice within the society will punish offenders, and treat everyone equally.Another prominent reason as to why Locke's system of government works so well is because it develops innocently out of the state of nature, solely for the well being of the society's individuals, which is achieved through the unity of those indivduals to form the society.John Locke died on October 28, 1704, at the age of seventy-two. John Locke was recognized as a great political philosopher during his own lifetime, and his theories would spread across the world and influence countless other individuals, as well as nations. The basic points of Locke's system of government was that there should be a constitutional government, in which the power goes up. The people allow the ruler to govern, and it is with their consent that he is able to do so.

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